Rosemary grown from clipping

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>So, this summer, I will plant my new fruit trees along the fencelines where passerby will have access to half (and hope they don't break too many branches)<

Sometimes it works the other way. For years (until they replaced the building) there was a plum tree growing outside the door to our local library. Nobody ever touched them. So I spoke to the head librarian, who said, "help yourself."

So I'm out there, on a ladder with a 5-gallon bucket, and several people asked "are those edible?" or "I didn't know you could pick those." But nobody ever joined me in the harvest.

I had that tree as a private fruit source for three years, until they took it down. Alas.
 
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Where are you located, Charron? There aren't too many places in North America that don't support edible wild and naturalized plants. 
 
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Southern Ontario.  I don't know that a lot of plants can't grow here (lots of cultivated stuff grows excellently) but not a lot is grown out where just anyone can get at it, in the more 'civilized' areas.  There was a large bush of, um, (poo, can't remember) growing outside the university library but I only discovered it just before they cut it down.

Herbs are plentiful if you can get out into the wild areas, just not the standard fare for everyday cooking.  Catnip, thistles, lemon balm, wintergreen (if you can find it).  Cattails, of course, are plentiful.  Fiddleheads, if you are very well timed and can get out of the city.  Sadly a lot of areas that could support edibles are either carefully landscaped into boring, easy to maintain 'green spaces' full of decorative-only plants, or sprayed with any manner of suppressing chemicals.

When I was a kid my grandmother and aunt would take us for walks in the forest to discover all manner of plants.  I look for them now, and can't find most of them.  Finding foodstuffs in the wild (or in parkinglot medians! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif), instead of having to buy them in the groceries, seems to be pretty far fetched.  Oh, except for rosehips.  You can find those around the local mall parkinglot.
 
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Joined Feb 26, 2007
Seems to be a bit different here regarding fruit trees etc grown in public places.  There are miles of streets where you'll find plum trees growing - I think the councils plant them for the flower beauty and the lovely purple colour of the foilage.  Again though - you will not see people harvesting the plums!  In Adelaide, South Australia, many councils would plant olive trees in median strips in the middle of the road (that's where I spent my first 30 years), yet the only ones you would see harvesting them were mature Italian and greek women, sticks in hand and buckets at the ready.  Near home surrounding the local swimming pool there, was the remains of an old vineyeard with really old, beautiful really bountiful red grape vines. Dad made some wine too. We ate well in summer.  Plus the Almond trees that lined the outer verges of the vineyard.  "Come on kids, grab a stick, the almonds are ready!" Followed by an evening of husking and shelling them.

In Darwin, Northern Territory, there were mango, coconut and cashew trees everywhere.  Never used the cashews - didn't know how to prepare them.  But the mangoes were great as were the coconuts (hard to open but worth the effort) as long as they didn't drop on your head.  Oww,

Update: Rosemary plant still alive, potted some more, fingers crossed.  Charron, I found it odd to find the plant there too, but now I park as close as I can to it when I go for a shop and then a clip /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif   Makes the car smell great on the way home too - added bonus.  More councils should do the same, not just plant useless plants.
 
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oop, there it is again lol    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/laser.gif    *beats down the jealousy with a stick* /img/vbsmilies/smilies/bounce.gif
 
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rofl Charron - settle down /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif    It was good there - very much a medittereanean (sp?) food based culture based on the community, well 20 years ago.  But the Almond trees have long since gone - the grapevines do remain (I believe they are "heritage listed" vines so cannot be torn down for housing), on my last visit home 2 years ago anyway. (BTW I didn't spend the first 30 years of my life camped on a median strip - I just re-read that and it looked silly.)

Planted some garlic cloves which where too small for cooking (to me)- you know, the inner ones which cling to the big ones you want so you end up tossing the clingers - , and they are sprouting beautifully along with the rosemary.  Wil leave them a good 9-12 motnhs before harvesting some.  When I've done that before they've come up as single clove/bulbs, very tasty, just different from the norm.  Heaps of moisture in them too.  I've been told I need to leave them longer than the 3-4 months I gave them last time to end up with the multi-cloved bulbs.

What I would also like to do is plant ginger - I love the stuff.  Will try and look up how to.

Anyone here had success with it?  Long process as far as what I have found out so far....

Hey, also planted mange tout (sweet/snow peas) from packaged seed, they have gone crazy out of control.  Ok yes, to translate,  they are growing very well, I must train them up onto a trellis.  It has taken only 3 weeks to get them to have a lot of greenery and the mange tout are about half size now.  Very tempted to try some, but will be patient and let them mature a touch more.
 
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I've been told I need to leave them longer than the 3-4 months I gave them last time to end up with the multi-cloved bulbs.

DC, garlic tells you when it's ready. The leaves start to turn brown (from the bottom upwards, btw). When 2/3-3/4 of the leaves have changed colors it's time to lift the bulbs.

However, what you've produced might not differentiate into cloves. Small cloves tend to produce either small differentiated bulbs, or what are called rounders. Rounders, which are what you've gotten, are perfectly good garlic, they're just undifferentiated. Basically, single small balls of garlic.

Now, here's the trick. If you cure the rounders, like any other garlic, and save them for seed stock, then replant them, the new bulbs will not only be differentiated, they've be, on average, larger.

This is why most garlic growers use their larger cloves as seed.
 
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Aha  - thank you KYH.  I think we had a garlic discussion a couple of years ago :)  Yes, last time I got rounders, they were pretty nice.

Righto, will try planting some big ones.  I take it curing means letting dry out in a dark dry place....?

Any ideas on ginger?  Geez I ask a lot of questions.
 
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With the ginger I'll cruise the net, but I think probably that I'll try breaking up a finger and putting the bits into some potting mix.  I know it takes a long time for ginger to mature, pretty much the same amount of time as garlic.  Will see what happpens.
 
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rofl Charron - settle down /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif    It was good there - very much a medittereanean (sp?) food based culture based on the community, well 20 years ago.  But the Almond trees have long since gone - the grapevines do remain (I believe they are "heritage listed" vines so cannot be torn down for housing), on my last visit home 2 years ago anyway. (BTW I didn't spend the first 30 years of my life camped on a median strip - I just re-read that and it looked silly.)

Planted some garlic cloves which where too small for cooking (to me)- you know, the inner ones which cling to the big ones you want so you end up tossing the clingers - , and they are sprouting beautifully along with the rosemary.  Wil leave them a good 9-12 motnhs before harvesting some.  When I've done that before they've come up as single clove/bulbs, very tasty, just different from the norm.  Heaps of moisture in them too.  I've been told I need to leave them longer than the 3-4 months I gave them last time to end up with the multi-cloved bulbs.

What I would also like to do is plant ginger - I love the stuff.  Will try and look up how to.

Anyone here had success with it?  Long process as far as what I have found out so far....

Hey, also planted mange tout (sweet/snow peas) from packaged seed, they have gone crazy out of control.  Ok yes, to translate,  they are growing very well, I must train them up onto a trellis.  It has taken only 3 weeks to get them to have a lot of greenery and the mange tout are about half size now.  Very tempted to try some, but will be patient and let them mature a touch more.
 So you wanna grow some gingah ayh mate
 (I have to work on that accent)

 Well, ginger is similar to ginseng as they are both arboreal plants (they both love shade) and both seem to grow in similar areas. 
I have a friend in Saskatchewan who diversified his crops to include ginseng and I helped him with his first planting seven years ago last fall and subsequently, helped him harvest his first crop last fall. 

 What I can tell you is that they like shade and well composted, rich soil which drains well. They hate direct sun, being watterlogged, and frost.

 I have grown ginger in containers at home and all I ever do is buy some rhizomes (ginger root) at my local supermarket that are nice and fresh with lots of 'eyes' just like a potato has so to speak.  The fresher, the better and springtime is best as it will trigger active growth in the rhizomes...err ginger root.

 Break the thumbs into pieces that contain at least three eyes (this works for me) just like pieces of seed potato and plant about 4" below the surface of the soil, eyes facing up. 

I have found that if you have the conditions right you can pretty well ignore them for the next year until harvest time.
 
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>I have found that if you have the conditions right you can pretty well ignore them for the next year until harvest time.<

What happens then? Do you get pretty good sized roots after just a year?

Ginsang is native to Kentucky, and quite a few old-timers supplement their income wild crafting it. It all gets shipped to Asia.

Coming down through BC, from Alaska, we passed one of the largest commercial operations in North America. Didn't even know what it was, at first---mile after mile of shade cloth supported on poles. Finally reached the gate to the farm, where we learned what was being grown. Then passed several more miles of beds.

My only regret is that we didn't have time to stop and tour the place.
 
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>I have found that if you have the conditions right you can pretty well ignore them for the next year until harvest time.<

What happens then? Do you get pretty good sized roots after just a year?

Ginsang is native to Kentucky, and quite a few old-timers supplement their income wild crafting it. It all gets shipped to Asia.

Coming down through BC, from Alaska, we passed one of the largest commercial operations in North America. Didn't even know what it was, at first---mile after mile of shade cloth supported on poles. Finally reached the gate to the farm, where we learned what was being grown. Then passed several more miles of beds.

My only regret is that we didn't have time to stop and tour the place.
 
Unless you have a freezing concern in the area, you can leave it as a perennial in your garden.  After a couple few years you can just have a continual supply of ginger root. 

 If you live in an area where freezing is a concern, you can cover with straw.  Usually 6" deep and the depth is important,  Too much and the rhizomes rot, too little and the rhizomes freeze.  This is what is done every fall at my friends farm for ginseng and the same for ginger.
 
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Hey - thanks for all the info.  Not much worry about freezing or permafrost /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif  so I'll mark out a spot and come back and see what's happened in a year.  If it does get really cold (doubtful) I'll go the straw trick.  May go for a big pot as we rent, so no chance of long term plots - drats.

KYH - that reminds me of the first time I saw tobacco being grown. Really tall poles linked by horizontal poles, all covered with shade cloth.  It must have just been harvested (this is in the middle of Tasmania) and there were the odd one or two long brown leaves left over hanging from the uprights. Thought to myself what the heck is that - found the answer later.  It sticks in my mind as an interesting memory.

Oh also poppies for making medicine are widely grown there, but in remote areas well fenced off, for the obvious reasons.

P.S. Fr33mason - Oi rekun ewe almost got it there ayh.  Goodonya  cobber/img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif
 
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Hey guys, pardon me to barge in on this discussion. Someone gave me 3 fresh rosemary clippings 2 days ago. I scraped the leaves from the bottom 2-3 inches and placed them in a glass of water.

The goal is to plant them outdoor (I'm in Southern California where we're having a mild-warm weather pretty much year round).

- Should I change the water every other day or so in my glass? 

- How long should the roots be before I plant it outside? 

- Do I really need potting soil etc...? I'd rather avoid a trip to the store if I can avoid it.

Thanks!!
 
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FF, rooting in water works best if the bottom stems are cut on a sharp angle. So if you haven't done that, pull the cuttings and do so.

Don't be surprised if the remaining leaves wilt and fall off. That's not a problem. In fact, most of the time, when starting cuttings, we remove all the leaves so that the plant energy goes into root production.

There's no need to change the water. Just make sure there's always some in there. Roots will only appear where the stem is kept constantly moist.

The downside to starting merely in water is that there's a greater chance of rot. Ideally, you'll have each of the cuttings in its own glass, to prevent cross contamination if that happens.

Once roots have developed, wait for new growth to appear before transplanting. And you'll more than likely have to harden-off the plants, because the sudden heat & sunlight can harm them.

Just for future reference, here's how I start seedlings from cuttings.

1. Cut bottom of stem at a sharp angle. Remove any foliage.
2. Wet the stem. Dip into rooting hormone powder.
3. Push stem into moist seed-starting media.
4. Wait for roots to develop.
5. Transplant or pot as appropriate.

To anticipate your next question: How do you know what the roots have developed? Answer: New growth will appear.
 
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DC, what you describe sounds more like curing the tobacco than growing it.

When tobacco was a big crop in Connecticut they would cure it outdoors that way. In the south, where tobacco was king, it was mostly cured in tobacco barns.
 
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Try and cut the stem under water with a clean razor blade.

 This will help prevent an embolisim within the stems which is a major reason why cuttings fail from the start.
 
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OK guys, so 2 out of my three clippings now have a thin, double white root about midway through the underwater part of the stem. The roots are bout 1 1/2 inch long now.

Is it ready to be planted in my backyard? Should I pick the sunniest spot? Lots of water at first? Any other idea?

Thanks so much, I'm really excited about this, it's the first time I plant something myself, and I already have plans for more!
 
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