Rosemary grown from clipping

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by dc sunshine, Jan 9, 2010.

  1. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

    Messages:
    2,753
    Likes Received:
    16
    Exp:
    Other
    Was on a walk round the neighbourhood and found a very conveniently placed huge rosemary bush, (no car in the driveway:rolleyes:), so trimmings were quickly snapped up for use with the lamb roast, but also was thinking of growing a bush from a trimming.

    Have them in water in jar at present. Any recommendations as to how to propagate it successfully?
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,463
    Likes Received:
    455
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Generally, and I forget the coreect term, a branch is bent down to the ground, cleared of leaves where it will be in contact wtih the ground, buried a bit and it will root.

    in your case, strip off the lower leave, apply a rooting hormone (usually a powder) and stick in moist potting soil. Keep it moist. There is some dispute on the efficacy of the rooting hormone I seem to recall.
     
  3. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

    Messages:
    2,753
    Likes Received:
    16
    Exp:
    Other
    Hi Phil,

    Yes I've heard of the technique too...what IS it called ? :)
    I'll give what you say a try. I managed to ...ummm... liberate quite a few stems, just for luck.

    We've just moved house, and I had a rosemary bush that was just really taking off, but due to quarantine laws, could not take it with us :( So, it's start again.

    Thanks!
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    With one exception, I'd follow Phil's advice.

    The exception: remove all the leaves, not just the bottom ones; otherwise some of the stem's energy will go into continuing their growth, instead of root production.

    Best bet, too, is to cut the bottom (root) end of the stem at a sharp angle.

    As to rooting hormone, I have mixed feelings. I've started cuttings both with and without it, and haven't decided for sure how much help it is---although the more herbacious the stem, the better it seems to work.

    However, it's cheap. And my attitude, generally, is if something doesn't hurt, and may help, then give it a go.
     
  5. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

    Messages:
    2,753
    Likes Received:
    16
    Exp:
    Other
    Ok....quick trip to the nursery planned for the rooting hormone. May try one with, one without. So, will cut the end of the stem as per cut roses, strip the leaves (and enjoy them!). And wait...patiently....Rosemary is mightily herbacious, and tenacious, once it gets going.

    I found another plant earlier today in the supermarket carpark, so I have lots to play with :D It must be superbly drought resistant, as the borders around the carpark get very little attention and water restrictions are very high here at the moment. I've taken to putting a bucket in the shower and using the water on the garden. We get 2 watering days a week, and that is for handwatering only, or 2 hour allowance from midnight till 2am on a drip feed system. If you miss your days, then too bad.

    Thanks again
     
  6. fr33_mason

    fr33_mason

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    I'd petition your municipal government to change your watering times.  Midnight till 2 A.M. is a poor choice in times.  Optimally, your best time for watering for the minimal wasteage is around 3 to 4 hours before sunrise. 

     After the sun goes down, plants go into a respiratory state.  Photosynthesis slows almost to a stop and they actually take in a small amount of oxygen and release CO2 during this time.  Plants at this time take in little to no water, hence the waste of water and potential for root problems.
     
  7. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,463
    Likes Received:
    455
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Generally those other hours are assigned to other communities.  Hopefully assignments will rotate every few years.
     
  8. amazingrace

    amazingrace

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    At home cook
    The process is called layering.  Find a fairly tender branch that can be bent to the ground.  Wound or scrape it where it is to come into contact with the moist soil,  and push it down until it is slightly below ground level.  Cover over that part of the branch with more earth,  and place a flat rock on top to hold it down.  Walk away,  and leave it there like that.  Once it has sent out good roots, you can cut the parent branch and dig up the new plant. 
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2010
  9. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    There's also air layering, a slightly different approach.

    For that one, you straddle the branch with a soil-filled container of some sort. Then walk away. Eventually roots will form at that spot, and you merely prune off that branch and plant it.
     
  10. amazingrace

    amazingrace

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Air layering can also be accomplished by slicing diagonally a third of the way into a branch, place a small wedge of wood, or even a toothpick, into the slice to keep it from closing up, then wrap the wound with moist sphagnum moss and then cover the moss with clear plastic and tie at both ends.  Leave this until roots emerge, then remove the new plant from the mother branch.  These various methods are used on different plants.  I used the above method for propagating deafembachia (spelling? AKA dumb cane). 
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2010
  11. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    Grace, I'm interested in your "cut 1/3 through" approach. I was taught that so long as the inner bark was exposed (and presuming, of course, it's the kind of plant that will work with air layering) roots would emerge. So I just make a series of scraping cuts around the mother branch. Guess I should have mentioned that in my above post; just didn't know how many would be interested in the mechanics.

    I've never done it, but I wonder if sprinkling rooting hormone in the cuts would speed the process?
     
  12. fr33_mason

    fr33_mason

    Messages:
    204
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
     I don't know if applying a rooting hormone would aid in the rooting process but it is definitely worth a try.  
     
     Thanks KYH, I now have another thing to try.....Like I didn't have enough to do already this spring /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif
     
  13. amazingrace

    amazingrace

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    At home cook
    KYH, either method will work.  In most cases it's a matter of preference. 
     
  14. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    FR33_Mason,

    What the heck. Everybody can use another hobby! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smoking.gif
     
  15. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

    Messages:
    2,753
    Likes Received:
    16
    Exp:
    Other
    Ok - the reults....didn't end up using hormones.  Plonked 4 sticks into a good potting mix, kept them a little moist.  One has taken - the others not.  Mind you, I've been busy of late so haven't paid them much attention.

    But I got one!!

    (layering is the word...thank you)
     
  16. amazingrace

    amazingrace

    Messages:
    929
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Congratulations!  I think one out of four is very good, especially for just rooting the cutting in a soil medium without the nutritional support of the mother plant.  Good job! 
     
  17. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    I'll second that motion. One for four is pretty good odds with this sort of thing.
     
  18. gerdosh

    gerdosh

    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    I live in Mediterranean climate of Northern California and rosemary loves this place; they grow into large bushes in front of our house. I clip twigs, place them in a water-filled vase and in a few months most sprouts bushy roots ready to be planted outside in the spring. They do take well.
     
  19. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

    Messages:
    2,753
    Likes Received:
    16
    Exp:
    Other
    Well, I figured I couldn't take too many clippings without being obvious - but yes it is pleasing to get one growing - I better pay it a bit more attention.

    Gerdosh - these bushes I freed the clippings from are great big beasties too - would love to get one to that stage.

    Maybe another stroll after twilight for some more ...
     
  20. charron

    charron

    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    I'm not jealous, I'm not jealous, I'm not jealous... ok, yes I am, a bit.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif   It still strikes me as odd to read about 'huge bushes' of rosemary growing in public places (a median in a parking lot! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif).  So much of what grows wild in more temperate areas doesn't survive the winter at my latitude.  To find any edibles, anything at all, growing wild around here is such an exciting treat.  I got giddy when I discovered some wild grapes growing along a fence line once lol

    It has always struck me as odd that more food sources aren't planted in public areas.  Fruit trees in parks would be lovely, but dropped fruit is probably too much to worry about cleaning up after...  Hardier herbs as decorative shrubberies?  Probably some legality about weed sprays or potential allergic reactions... sigh.  Around here everything is so controlled its hard to imagine anyone ever being able to forage for survival.

    So, this summer, I will plant my new fruit trees along the fencelines where passerby will have access to half (and hope they don't break too many branches) and I think I'll train the peas and beans up the privacy fence where they can grow through to the side where my customers walk up from the park.  Until then, I'll dream about monster rosemary running wild /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif