Rock-Hard Confectioner's (Icing) Sugar-HELP!

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by fbacker, Dec 12, 2003.

  1. fbacker

    fbacker

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    Hello!

    In an attempt to make "vanilla sugar" ("Vanille Zucker" in German) for use in Viennese torten out of confectioner's/icing sugar, I have wound up with 3 Tahitian vanilla beans encased in 3 rock-hard cylinders of cementlike confectioner's/icing sugar, despite having sealed each canister air tight.

    In Europe, one can usually buy "Vanille Zucker" ready-made in packets (Dr. Oetkar is the usual brand). I know how to soften brown/pieces sugar which has hardened by warming it in a low oven, but is there a way to re-pulverise confectioner's/icing sugar? I'd hate to waste either the sugar or the top-quality vanilla beans. Incidentally, I do not live in a humid area, so this is particularly surprising.

    Any advice would be most appreciated.

    fbäcker
     
  2. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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    Try throwing in a piece of bread. It works for brown sugar, it should work for this too.
     
  3. fbacker

    fbacker

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    Will this work once the sugar is already rock-hard?
     
  4. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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    I have used this method to make brick-like brown sugar back into soft, usable sugar. Put a slice of fresh bread in the container and close it back up. In a day or two just enough moisture will wick out of the bread to soften up the sugar. Good luck.
     
  5. m brown

    m brown

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    try using a cheese grater to re-powder your sugar.
     
  6. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Yes, the bread method should work with sugar that is already rock hard.

    Just leave the bread in for about two to three days and see how it is...

    In the future, consider putting the sugar in a sealed heavy duty freezer zip lock bag and then inside a jar with a tight lid.

    Even if you don't think you live in a humid area, there can be moisture in the air from many things, including rain, just enough for the sugar to absorb.
     
  7. m brown

    m brown

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    Here is my fear, the bread has yeast and the sugar is confectioners. I am thinking the sugar may liquify with the introduction of the enzymes and active molds. do not leave it for more than3 days and use it up fast.
    honestly, a box grater is a beautiful thing.
     
  8. mudbug

    mudbug

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    That said, consider boiling a clean damp sponge (or piece of one) and ringing out most of it in a clean towel, then put it in the jar/container...

    What type of container is it? If it's something like a pickle jar, grating might not be an option.
     
  9. lotuscakestudio

    lotuscakestudio

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    When I worked at Whole Foods and used Florida Crystals sugar, we'd often get in a whole 50# bag hard as a brick. I would knock it up a bit to turn it into big rocks then dump it in the storage container. Then cover the top with a damp cloth and put the lid on. At least the top portion was ready to use by the end of the day. Sometimes I'd have to re-dampen the cloth halfway through.
     
  10. thebighat

    thebighat

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    I have the same trouble with Florida Crystals, but I just rub the stuff through a big sieve. Takes a couple of minutes, but the sugar comes out great. I really like that stuff, but it makes yucky looking simple syrup.
     
  11. lotuscakestudio

    lotuscakestudio

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    Big Hat, I had to do the damp cloth thing when the WHOLE BAG of sugar turned into a rock. When it's mildly hard, I was able to sieve, but often, 3/4 - the full bag was one complete solid brick. I'd beat the **** out of it to break it into smaller pieces so I could get it in the bin. THEN use the damp rag. THEN I'd still have to sieve it. You're right: UGLY SYRUP. Hahahaha.
     
  12. headless chicken

    headless chicken

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    If memory serves me right :)D I love that quote)
    starch is added to icing sugar as a preventative of hardening icing sugar. I guess some countries use more or less starch in their formula but would adding more help fbäcker in the future? Just a suggestion/question, I wasn't 100% sure.
     
  13. hildijo

    hildijo

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    When I had rock hard icing sugar, I put the core of an apple in the container and - voila - soft icing/powered sugar in a day or so :)
     
  14. junaid

    junaid

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    Hi

    I uploaded a picture of a biscuit which I want to ice. I need help to make icing sugar that is rock hard. Thus, if anyone knows of a recipe for rock hard icing for biscuits. Please help me out :)