Roasting just the Turkey breast? Need advice.

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by penguin, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. penguin

    penguin

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    [font=&quot]We don’t care for dark meat and to keep the dinner simple this Thanksgiving, I purchased a free range turkey this year with nothing added to it. I had the butcher remove the wings and legs so I just have the breast remaining. I’m using the wings and legs to make some turkey broth tomorrow and plan to brine and roast the breast for Thanksgiving. [/font]

    [font=&quot]I’m recovering from a pretty bad concussion and had hoped to keep this simple but by changing things I’m not sure what the best method is. I would like to do a simple brine, then roast in the oven. [/font]

    [font=&quot]Here are a few questions I have:[/font]
    [font=&quot]Because it is only the breast, do I check for 160 F from the breast, then let it rest for 20 minutes out of the oven before carving? [/font]
    [font=&quot]Should I use a 1 cup salt, 1 cup vinegar, 1 cup sugar, 1 gallon water brine for 8 hours (the Turkey is 7.5 LB)? [/font]
    [font=&quot]I need to keep the turkey dairy free so making a butter compound isn’t an option. I can use oil or rendered chicken fat from my broth, would the chicken fat be a better option for flavor? [/font]

    [font=&quot]I’m very comfortable with all the side dishes for Thanksgiving, but have little experience preparing the turkey. Any advice would be appreciated![/font]

    [font=&quot]Thanks,[/font]
    [font=&quot]Emily[/font]
     
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I prepare turkey breasts all the time and it is much much easier than roasting a whole turkey. I only do one breast at a time, but this wouldn't be much different for 2 breasts. I would however split the 2 breasts apart to roast.

    I don't have any experience with brining but I hear it's very good. I roast mine simply and it turns out juicy and delicious. The less you fuss with the turkey the better it is.

    I make a wet rub for my turkey with olive oil and dried or fresh herbs. You might use oregano and rosemary, or cumin and corriander, whatever flavors you want. Combine the herbs with salt and pepper, and drizzle in enough olive oil to make a tight wet rub. Then I shmear it all over the turkey breast ontop and under the skin.

    Stick in a 425 oven (uncovered) for 30 minutes (or until the skin is golden) then drop the oven down to 350 and let it cook until it reaches 150 degrees in the thickest part of the breast without touching bone. Don't baste while cooking, just leave it be and the skin will stay crisp. When it comes out of the oven wrap it in foil and let it stand for about 10 minutes before carving.