Roast pork leg

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Aug 15, 2014.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I've had the misfortune of running into a few roast pork legs and they have all left me fairly unsatisfied. Dry, dry, dry. It's no wonder I've never attempted to roast one myself. But part of me wants to figure this thing out. I've stuck to the deliciousness of a roast pork butt (thanks to @French Fries) long enough to know my way around it. Now what about this back leg? How does one go about roasting it so that it is not dry and tasteless?
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2014
  2. butzy

    butzy

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    Slowly and at low heat.

    Are you going to make it on the barbecue, inside a smoker or in the oven?
     
  3. mike9

    mike9

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    We always called that a fresh ham and when it's roasted low and slow it is such a wonderful thing. 
     
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    In the oven. Ok so there is hope? Cook it covered?
     
  5. everydaygourmet

    everydaygourmet

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    Porchetta! While usually a boneless preparation have used the spice blend as a rub for roasts including tenderloins. Low and slow definitely for the bulk of the process. Have started high @ 450 for 30-45 minutes then down to 225 for 4 hrs+ depending on the size of the roast. Also done the opposite low and then high to crisp the skin, high to low seems to work best. I have also cut slits in the fresh ham and stuffed the spice blend into the roast capping the slits with a whole garlic clove, ham or bacon to stop the juices from flowing out during the cooking process.

    Cheers!

    EDG
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2014
  6. everydaygourmet

    everydaygourmet

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    These are a fresh shoulder we de boned for a Porchetta



     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2014
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  7. french fries

    french fries

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    Roasting a leg of pork sounds good. In France we usually boil and bake... the trendy thing in France right now is to cook pork legs in hay...


    @EverydayGourmet  that porchetta is simply STUNNING! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
     
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  8. maryb

    maryb

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    I have dome many fresh hams on the weber kettle charcoal grill. Cook indirect with charcoal on both sides, mop with 7up. Pull when temp reaches 145 near the bone.
     
  9. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    Pernil --Cuban or Puerto Rican roast pork leg or picnic shoulder. This recipe is for either. Though it doesn't say it in this one, the recipes I trust tell you to score the rind with a knife (or a utility knife!) down through the fat but not into the meat and rub the seasoning into the incisions.

    http://icuban.com/food/lechon_asado.html

    This is the recipe I would use if I were making it, though a leg is going to be bigger, so I'd increase the qty of the seasoning:

    http://www.cookstr.com/recipes/cuban-style-marinated-slow-roasted-pork-picnic-shoulder

    This is from Molly Stevens' All About Roasting, which is an absolutely fabulous cookbook
     
  10. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Thanks for the suggestions. Do you suggest a wet roasting method over dry?

    Hay? I've never heard of such a thing. Go on.
     
  11. ordo

    ordo

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