Right edge for the right job

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by pipelinegypsy, Jun 12, 2012.

  1. pipelinegypsy

    pipelinegypsy

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    Do you put different edges on your knives for different applications? And if so, what do you use?

    In preparing to have my knives sharpened, I am curious what is the best angle/bevel/finish combination for a knife (Wusthof Classic) used primarily for slicing raw meat/fish?
     
  2. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Do I use different angles for different knives?  Yes, but not that many angles.  As a rule, I try and sharpen the most acute angle a knife can hold without going out of true too easily -- so it's more or less specific for a given alloy of a given hardness and a given use.  And, the angles are pretty much standard; so I use a total of three different profiles for all my knives.

    I won't swear to it, but believe Wusthof has changed their edge profile slightly since going away from hand sharpening (on a wheel) to "laser" guided machine sharpening.  They're now using 18* flat-bevel with 50/50 symmetry.  

    In terms of staying true, Wusthofs are kind of marginal.  If it's not too much trouble, I'd start at 15*.  If that needed too much steeling to hold a true edge, I'd try a slightly more abtuse micro-bevel. 

    If that doesn't make sense, try getting as close to 20* as possible -- that's standard for Wusthofs. 

    If you're portioning a lot of fish, you'll want a medium to medium-fine finish.  If you're breaking down a lot of fish and meat you'll want something with a little bite.  Something in the 3K (JIS) neighborhood would kind of split the difference.   A black Arkansas might be even better.

    You're probably going to be doing a lot of steeling.  You'll fine to polished "steel," to stay in true without putting too much scuff on the blade. 

    BDL