Ribs in the Oven?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Oct 11, 2011.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I have some spare ribs in the fridge that we were intending on slow-cooking on the grill outside.  But it turns out I have to work in the evenings so we won't be able to.  I still want to cook them before I go to work, can I throw them in the oven?  I've never made oven baked ribs before so wouldn't know how to do it.  I'm thinking cook them slowly covered and then blast them uncovered in the end?
     
  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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     You can smoke them at low-mid temperature on the grill for 2-3 hours then bring them inside to finish cooking when you feel like having ribs.  This way you get convenience plust good smoke flavor.

    The temperature on the grill should be a little above slow smoking, enough to brown and cook the ribs but not burn them.  Wrap in foil, put them in the freezer, remove and finish cooking in the oven at 325F until done.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  3. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    I would put them in a crockpot (slow cooker) if you have it that would be a fantastic way to cook them and they will come out so tender each time. Smoking them on a grill for 2-3 hours uses a ton of fuel and requires a lot of attention. The crock pot is a full proof way for tender ribs with little hassle for a busy schedule. You won't get the flavor of the grill but given your situation I think it is an excellent alternative.
     
  4. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Kuan and Nicko's ideas are very good. 

    But to go right to your question:  Yes, you can throw them in the oven.  There are a lot of oven recipes for great ribs which don't include or mimic outdoor methods.  One traditional favorite is spare ribs cooked with sauerkraut.  It's a very easy dish to make, and should you want to know more I'll happily supply a recipe.

    BDL
     
  5. quetex

    quetex

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    A little salt and pepper and chili powder will make a mighty fine rib in the over, yes sir.

    You guys see that show a few weeks ago on food network where they cook two racks and had three judges taste between one rack outdoor grilled and the other in the oven with liquid smoke. Two out of the three guys picked the oven rib to be the bbq'd rib. I call  complete BS on that one and me thinks the liquid smoke people paid for that episode no doubt about it in my mind, lol.
     
  6. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Grilling them outside is not an option for today.  Hubby won't be home until I leave for work and I don't handle the grill.  Crock pot would be nice but I don't have one of those.  Wouldn't cooking slowly in the oven render the same results?  I don't like sauerkraut BDL.  I'd be nice to replicate outdoor ribs but it's not a necessity.  I just don't want them to be wet.
     
  7. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    They can take 4 or so hours at 250. But they'll be done then. So you can't leave them in there all day.
     
  8. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    You can still cook them in the oven without sauerkraut.  How about onions? 

    Preheat your oven to 275. 

    Lay a bed of thick sliced onions in a large baking pan.  If you like roasted garlic, consider throwing in a couple of whole garlic heads as well.

    Trim the spare ribs, including taking the membrane from the bony side of the ribs and any necessary cutting to fit them into your largest baking pan. 

    Season the ribs as you would for outdoor cooking (if you want a seasoning recipe -- sure).  You may use liquid smoke, smoked salt, smoked paprika, or smoked anything else without added fear of eternal damnation.

    Lay the ribs in the pan on top of the onions -- meaty side up; bony, cup side down -- cover with foil. 

    Put the ribs in the oven and cook for 3-1/4 hours. 

    Remove from the oven, uncover, and check for doneness by using the "wiggle" and/or "bend test."  If the ribs aren't very close to done, cover and return to the oven for another half hour.  If they are, remove the onions and garlic, and set them aside.  You may also baste and/or glaze the ribs if you like.  Use the drippings, barbecue sauce, fruit jelly cut with bourbon, or... ? 

    Return to the oven uncovered.  Allow to cook for another 20 minutes so a light crust can form or the glaze can set. 

    Remove from the pan, portion and sauce the ribs as desired.  Serve the onions and garlic with toast or crusty bread as a side. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  9. Iceman

    Iceman

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    WOW. Hhhmmmmm. Interesting. 

    I've cooked from 1 rack to 12 racks to a very nice "gently peel off" consistency in the oven by braising for 2 1/2 hours @ 250*. Yes, it's the Alton Brown style, if you were gonna ask. I make a rub, then rub up the ribs, put them away in a zip-lock for anywhere from 3 hours to overnight, lay them in a pan w/ 1 cup braising liquid, seal the pan for all it's worth, then cook them up. After the 2 1/2 hours, not any longer, I pour out all the liquid and reduce it to half. I paint up the ribs and put them back uncovered in a screaming hot oven (500*+) for 10 or so minutes. Serve 'em up. I've never had any complaints. 

    * Standard sides always include baked beans, cole-slaw and corn-bread.     But that's for another thread.
     
  10. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    x
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2011
  11. Iceman

    Iceman

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    Hey BDL ..........

    I started out using Alton's way, then I just simply modified it to exactly what I posted. I hate baby-back, I almost always use spare-ribs. The way I posted is the way I do spare-ribs. When using baby-backs you don't get anywhere near the good cook-down liquid, you get rendered-out fat. That doesn't reduce.  If my style is just put back in the oven without the painted-on sauce, to crisp up, they wouldn't be wet (plus, I didn't see that last part in the original post). DUH. 
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  12. maryb

    maryb

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    I have done them in the oven uncovered and had them turn out fine. Lay on a sheet pan and cook at 250 as mentioned until tender. I do mop once an  hour to add some moisture and that extends the cook time with opening the oven door. I am not a fan of foiling ribs as you can tell, when I do them on the smoker I never use foil.
     
  13. chefedb

    chefedb

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    If they are covered with foil they steam.  BDL havn't had ribs with kabusta (kraut) in 40 years  Brings back memories of my grandmother.
     
  14. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Just curious, Mary: do you have an actual objection to foil, or is this just the way you happen do it? If you do object, I'd like to know why?

    I don't cook ribs in foil. But I finish them by taking them off the grill, wrapping in foil, and letting them sit for a final half-hour. That gives me the finish I like: Just enough tooth so you have to pull the meat off the bone, but the meat is moist and flavorsome.
     
  15. dledmo

    dledmo

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    I do ribs in the oven more often than on a grill or smoker.  Start with a large disposable aluminum pan or chafing dish (I get mine at Sam's Club, 15 for about $12, easily fits 2 full racks and a third if positioned carefully).  Remove the membrane on the underside of the ribs then coat with a dry rub, you could add some liquid smoke to the pan also.  Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil and bake in the oven at 275 for about 4 hours.  Remove the foil and coat ribs with you choice of BBQ sauce and return to oven for another 45 min.  Toss the pan for super easy clean up, my kids love this recipe!
     
  16. sherbel

    sherbel

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    Living on the 'wet coast', I often have to do ribs in the oven. I usually use foil for a few hours on low heat, (250ish, with a rub), and then finish for the final couple of hours without a cover. I do mop with a fairly wet sauce, and I often have to remove fat from the pan part way through the process.
     
  17. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Thank you for the suggestions, I do intend to try them in the oven however we've decided to do them outdoors today even though it's raining.  Don't ask me why lol.  I'd like to try Mary's method of leaving them uncovered but is that possible without a mop?  I don't like wet ribs. 

    Why oh why do you remove the membrane?  it's one of my favorite parts to gnaw on.
     
  18. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    The membrane blocks seasoning and is generally considered unpleasant to eat.

    So removing it helps you season the meat evenly and completely and makes for what most feel is a better chew.
     
  19. quetex

    quetex

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    Yes it is possible with out a mop, keep the lid closed and dont peek too often it helps keep them moist and tender and juicy.

    I am not a fan of foil either for cooking but for resting yes, although I do sometimes wrap at competition when running behind, cooks faster that way.

    the ones in the tray are from this past weekends cook the others at home, no foil needed. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif

    [​IMG]

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  20. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Ice,

    I owe you an apology for "taking off on a rant."  Right or wrong, I was out of line and am deleting the offensive post.  Your contributions are always good, even if my mood isn't.  

    BDL