Rib Eye Steak

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chefbecky, Apr 15, 2015.

  1. chefbecky

    chefbecky

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    I have clients who want rib eye for dinner, and I don't usually make it as I find it tough for my taste.  I have access to Black Angus Rib Eye choice.  Am I best to do it stove top in cast iron or on a grill?  I tried stove top last night - very tasty but a little tough as usual.  Perhaps I should have finished it in the oven?  Anyone have suggestions or secret tricks.  Have to do for 6 people at a their villa, where the stove is good but the grill not so. 
     
  2. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Buying Angus beef does not guarantee a superior product.
    It is so popular because it is faster to raise and despite less time spent in the feed lot (cheaper for producer to raise) has been proven to develop a quality marbling .

    It drives me crazy when the supermarkets charge so much more for say a choice cut of Angus over a prime cut of whatever the chain has sent out.
    Altho I use the opportunity to stock up a bit lol.
    Just take it out of the plastic or butcher paper and freezer wrap.

    As for the ribeyes ?
    Are they coming from the same source as the tough ones?
    If so I would be wary.

    mimi
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2015
  3. cerise

    cerise Banned

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    For one or two people, I would pan sear in a hot cast iron pan, and finish in the oven.  Let the beef come to room temp, get your dry pan (cast iron) really hot, coat the steaks lightly with oil, & season w/ S&P on both sides, and sear on both sides.  Use tongs to flip, rather than puncture the meat - so the juices don't run out.  Finish in the oven for a few minutes (depending on doneness to taste), flipping with tongs.  Let the beef rest. You might top each with a compound butter (bleu cheese etc.). Since you are cooking for 6, you might be better off using a grill (more surface area).
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2015
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Tough ribeyes? I've never heard of such a thing, in my opinion they are the most tender cut of steak.

    As for "how" I firmly believe nothing can beat a chargrilled steak. Be generous with the salt and I like a lot of crushed pepper too and that's all you need. Dress it up with an herbed compound butter at the end and some beautiful simple sides like asparagus, salad and a proper baked potato.

    Recently I've been doing short dry brines on steak. I like the result. Take it out of the fridge and season liberally. By the time it comes to room temp it's ready for the grill. Just pat dry again and off it goes to meet the grill.
     
  5. french fries

    french fries

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    That was my first reaction to this post as well. Rib eyes should never be tough. 
     
  6. chefbecky

    chefbecky

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    Thanks! 

    I compared a black angus choice to a regular US choice last night and was surprised that the non black angus was more tender.  However, the angus was noticeably more flavorful, so I'm forking out for it again tonight. 
     
  7. chefbecky

    chefbecky

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    They have a lot of fiber and consequently can be toothy.
     
  8. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I find them pleasantly toothy and so might your guests since they requested them :)

    I find filet to be tender but it lacks flavor.
     
  9. french fries

    french fries

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    Have you ever had Kalbi?
     
  10. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I always prefer my steak grilled but if you are going to have to do it on the stove top I hope they have a hood or vent.  To get a really good sear on those steaks you are going to have use a really hot pan and that is going to generate a good amount of smoke.  You might almost be better off searing them ahead of time and finishing in the oven.
     
  11. chefbecky

    chefbecky

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    I'm going armed to do that, taking my cast iron pans, but going to see how hot I can get the grill and use it if possible.

    Yes, they requested the rib eye so I should just relax.  But there will be 2 new faces at the table tonight, just arrived, who "own 3 award winning restaurants".  No pressure there!  I'll take along a pricey and chewy red (15.2%) for them, and maybe me as well. 
     
  12. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Ditto, except I often use the word "mushy" when describing filet.

    The only time I've had a really tough rib eye is when I was forced to eat one well done.
     
  13. laurenlulu

    laurenlulu

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    Massage your meat 😋 don't know if it helps but it's fun
     
  14. chefbecky

    chefbecky

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    HaHa Thanks for that!  I can use some fun. 
     
  15. maryb

    maryb

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    Had a ribeye last night. I don't find them tough at all. Sure there is a little bit of connective tissue near the fat pocket on one end but nothing objectionable. If 1" thick or under I would pan sear on a super hot pan. Do not flip until the steak slides when the pan is shaken. Flip, lower the heat and cook to desired temp. Or flip and into a 450 oven to finish. Either way make sure the range hood works! If over 1" sear then into the oven for sure to finish.
     
  16. chefbecky

    chefbecky

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    Thanks for the suggestions.  They are 1 1/2" thick, trimmed up and ready to go.  I shall report back tomorrow! 

    Mushroom bruschetta 

    Caprese skewers 

    Greens, lightly pickled beets, shaved fennel blood orange salad 

    The steaks with parsley rosemary butter 

    Shredded brussel sprouts 

    Roasted butternut squash 

    Oven roasted potato chips 

    Molten chocolate cakes 
     
  17. french fries

    french fries

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    Suggestions, secrets or tips.... here we go. 

    For 1"1/2, I wouldn't bother with finishing in the oven, unless you want medium well or well done. Most people like their rib-eye medium rare, but it never hurts to ask obviously. 

    I would:

    - Take the steak out of the fridge 1 hour before. 

    - Preheat the pan very slowly and for a long time until very hot. 

    - Season liberally with sea salt and black pepper just before adding the steak to the pan.

    - Add the oil and nearly immediately add the steak.

    - Sear for 2mn or so and flip, sear for another 2mn. 

    - Reduce the heat to medium-low and add a nice pat of butter, a couple of smashed garlic cloves and a few sprigs of thyme. 

    - Continue cooking for 3mn while constantly basting the top of the steak with the flavored butter with a spoon,

    - Flip and continue cooking and basting for another 3mn. 

    - Remove to a tray and rest for 5 or 10 mn. 

    - Place a piece of your compound butter on top of each steak before serving. 

    I prefer thyme to rosemary for beef steaks, but that's most likely a matter of personal preference. And I don't suppose there's anything wrong with using both thyme and rosemary in the same dish. 

    Slice (if desired) and plate the steaks, then sprinkle the slices (or whole steaks) with a little bit of fleur de sel and freshly ground black pepper. IMO S&P before AND after cooking is one of the secrets to great seasoning for most meats. 

    I'm sure you probably knew most of this already but hopefully some of it helped. Enjoy!

    PS: If you don't mind another suggestion, I would add diced black olives to the fennel/blood orange salad. To me, that's an automatic pairing. 

    Now this made me hungry for a big rib eye steak. Hmmmm... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif  
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2015
  18. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    @French Fries  I prefer thyme over rosemary for steak too go figure!  Unless it's a porterhouse, a little rosemary with that is fine, it can handle it.  But have you ever tried oregano?  It's actually fantastic, it works.  

    Also, instead of oiling the pan have you tried oiling the steak instead?  When I pan sear steaks I rub them with the olive oil and seasonings instead of dropping the oil in the pan.  

    I have a terrible ventilation system so I never sear steaks indoors.
     
  19. french fries

    french fries

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    I have not! Are you thinking of fresh or dried oregano? I have only very little experience with fresh oregano. 
    I think I've done that in the past... I do that sometimes when grilling steaks... but for pan searing I prefer the oil to be super hot when I put the steak in... not sure it makes a huge difference to be honest. I guess oiling the steak rather than the pan has the advantage of using only the necessary amount, and having oil only where the steak is in contact with the pan. Have you noticed a difference? Maybe I'll try that again next time I sear a steak in a pan.
     
  20. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I use dry oregano. I love it but then again I'm Greek so....

    The only difference is that I use less oil. It sizzles as soon as it hits the pan so no worries that it's not hot enough.