Reuben sandwich

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by depaul, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. depaul

    depaul

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    I need to introduce reuben sandwich to my daily specials. I already have pastrami available in the kitchen.What is the best recipe for Reuben...Corned beef or can i use patrami.
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've had it with pastrami and prefer it with pastrami over corned beef. I believe Corned Beef is more traditional though.  What customers in your area expect is probably what you should go with.
     
  3. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    The last few years pastrami has become an acceptible alternative. But the original Reuben used corned beef.

    From inside out the ingredients are: sauerkraut, thousand island dressing, sliced corned beef, Swiss cheese, rye bread.
     
  4. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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     Is a Pastrami Reuben a traditional Reuben, No but it's a good Reuben........These are some pictures of how I make mine, I use a Beavers hot and sweet mustard, I like the taste better than 1000 Island dressing..........CHefBillyB

     

         

     
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2011
  5. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Real Corned Beef, Kraut, Thousand Island, swiss cheese Rye bread.(and its Grilled) Try and use unseeded rye so as older people ask for it because seeds get caught in their dentures.

    People order Pastrami (this is normally called a Rachel.)  They also order Turkey Reuben  which subs cole slaw for kraut.
     
  6. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    And there's also a Red Baron, which uses spiced red cabbage instead of the kraut. Red Baron's usually, but not always, are served on either dark rye or pumpernickle.

    One of the more popular small plates I put out for guests is called a Reuben Exploration. Depending on my mood, and what else is being served, it consists of from 3 to 5 miniature variations on the Reuben theme, all on one plate. Among those I might include are: regular Reubens, Reuben puffs; Reuben soup; Reuben fritters; Red Barons; Reuben casserole;......the list goes on and on.

    More and more the basic Reuben flavor profile is being combined with other ingredients. The strangest I ever sampled was in the Outer Banks, where one restaurant serves what it calls a Mahi-Mahi Reuben. More like a Rachel, it's pastrami, kraut, thousand island, and a batter-fried mahi-mahi filet, served on a hogie bun. It's one of those combinations that sounds like it shouldn't work, but does.
     
  7. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I made a reuben casserole once that was pretty good too. Got the idea from one of the PBS fund drive specials.
     
  8. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I do a pastrami reuben. Not traditional, and don't use rye. Serve it on a toasted Amaroso roll. Sells well.
     
  9. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    No criticism intended, but how many "non traditional" variations does it take before a sandwich ceases to be a Reuben and becomes something else?

    BDL
     
  10. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    Up until the point the Jewish owner doesn't throw your ass out of the Deli, That would be when you order a Reuben, with Mayo, lettuce and Tomato...............
     
     
  11. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Oy.  That would be trows your tushie out from the door...

    Besides, a Reuben isn't particularly Jewish -- once you've put cheese on meat you've entered the melting pot.  Also, the no white bread/ lettuce/ mayo/ tomato thing is restricted to corned beef and pastrami sandwiches.  But you're telling a joke and not too badly at that, so... hokay fine gei gezundt.

    I can certainly live with pastrami, but have difficulty calling a sandwich with any cheese other than Swiss, and/or any bread other than rye a Reuben.  Grilled and sauerkraut go without saying as sine qua non.  I don't think russian dressing (or thousand island) are essential.  But I'm ridiculously conservative about some things and not particularly interested in my own opinion.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  12. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Try this on yor menu    Reuben Silders 4 to the order. Same as regular reuben but made on cocktail rye bread. or cut in half can be served as Hor's d  passed

    Save scraps of corned beef . Shred up and add  chopped saurkraut, grated swiss mix into a fritter  batter and small scoop into fryer. Serve with 1000 Isle dippin sauce

    It's a toss up as to where originated some say in Nebraska in a hotel others say Reubens Deli in NY in 1914. In any event whoever, wherever  they are good and great sellers. In any event can't be Jewish Deli, because as BDL says  meat and cheese mixed is  a no=no. I would bet Slavic in origination.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  13. sagemore48

    sagemore48

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    howdy!

    wow,the tasty roast.....with some vegetable...woww,eat it whole mouth.huh/img/vbsmilies/smilies/peace.gif

    or my way would be with some more tomato pieces,and some chilli powder.

    thk u for yr roast.

    home then go for mine
     
  14. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Good basic question, BDL, and one that can apply to many dishes and techniques. How far do you push the poached eggs on English muffin envelope before they stop being Eggs Benedict. And so forth.

    The thing about a Reuben is that the ingredients combine to form a specific, recognizable flavor profile. I think that so long as that profile is maintained you're justified in continuing the name. But once you break it, it's no longer a Reuben. That's why so many of the major variations carry different names. Or, to put a point on it: Sorry, chefbubba, pastrami on a hogie bun might be a good sandwhich, but it most certainly is not a Reuben.

    To me, pastrami and corned beef are very different, and I would not call a sandwhich made with Swiss, pastrami, kraut, and K-island on rye a Reuben. Nor would I use that name for a sandwich using chicken or turkey and coleslaw. Nor one using spiced red cabbage.

    However, food in forms other than a sandwhich, which replicate the flavor profile, can carry the Reuben designation, albiet with a qualifier: Reuben soup; Reuben puffs, etc. To me this says, "here is something that retains the tastes of a Reuben, but is not merely a different sandwhich masquerading as one."
     
  15. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    The whole principle of building a proper menu is to make your customer understand what you have to offer. If a customer orders a Pastrami Reuben then they are getting the point across and getting what they want. If the customer orders a Pastrami Reuben Hoagie, they are getting their request understood by the seller and getting the sandwich they want. I think Chefbuba understands that he is not selling a traditional Reuben sandwich. Chefbuba, does understands what works in his operation and offers his customers a great sandwich using many of the same characteristics and ingredients of the original sandwich. At no time did anyone say they were serving a traditional Reuben sandwich......The point is, the customer gets what they want, that's what staying in business is all about....................
     
  16. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    No argument with your basic contention, Billy.

    My problem is simply this: A named sandwich is made a particular way. That's why it has a name, so that people who order it know what they should be getting. Most people, if they order a Reuben, expect the traditional version.

    If you're going to change the ingredients radically, then it behooves you to just describe what you're offering, rather than using the name. Or qualify it on the menu, such as: "Reuben Hogie: Our take on the classic deli sandwhich, we combine lean pastrami, kraut, and our special dressing on an amboroso roll, top it with grated Swiss, and broil until until the cheese is bubbly."  

    However, part of developing a bring-'em-back menu is to offer selections that are, or seem to be, uniquely your own. In this case, I'd give the sandwich a different name altogether, then use the description as above, working the word Reuben into it..... "Our take on the classic Reuben sandwich......"

    As an aside, I would include a bit of ground caraway seed in the hogie (likely mixed in with the kraut), to retain the rye-bread flavor profile.
     
  17. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    Ky, I'm in a small meat & potatoes town. Fancy don't work here!... Caraway seeds in the kraut might scare them off..seriously.

    I call it a pastrami Reuben on a toasted hoagie roll. If I just described the sandwich as grilled pastrami w/ swiss/kraut & 1000 it would not sell.

    My customers are at least familiar with what the basic concept of a reuben. It works for me. Hell, I even get a couple of people a week that ask what pastrami is!
     
  18. Iceman

    Iceman

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    LOL. Be happy chefbuba. In my place people don't order anything over $6, except for really stupid drinks like "Lemon Drops" which are $10, and anything with "Bomb" included which are all over $6. They make all kinds of noise if their 30¢ wings take 15 minutes. They also have all kinds of money to order 5 large pizzas "To-Go" on half price BEAR Sunday. LOL. Gotta love "Bar-People"