Restaurant desserts: yeast doughnut

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by freshbaked, Aug 27, 2016.

  1. freshbaked

    freshbaked

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    Hello!
    Im working on a doughnut recipe for a new restaurant. I am very happy with my recipe, however the dough does not sit well during service. The recipe generally goes as follows: mix yeast, milk, and flour (starter) sit for 30 minutes. Combine other ingredients, sit for 30 minutes. Punch dough, cut to size and sit for 30 minutes. Fry after the 30 minuted is up. The doughnuts are then sprinkled with powdered sugsr and filled with a variety of fillings (cookies & cream, PB&J, blueberry cheesecake, lemon curd, chocolate moose, salted caramel, ect.) The doughnuts are exactly how i want them (more importantly they are how the owner wants them to be, too), but if they sit longer than 30 minutes (which they obvioudly will during lunch/dinner service) they continue to rise and lose quality. How can i prepare these yeast doughnuts for service? After the final rise can i refridgerate them until ready to drop into the fryer?
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2016
  2. jcakes

    jcakes

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    Try refrigerating them after you cut them and see if there's any loss of quality.  Then I'd continue this to see just how long you can hold them before the quality suffers. I use Gina DePalma's bomboloni recipe and I've held it successfully for a day and I think you'd be able to do this too meaning, refrigerate it after you add the other ingredients to the starter (up to the punch down stage)
     
  3. chefross

    chefross

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    I've done this before in places I work.

    Retarding the dough is generally used in many places with yeast products.

    During the day, right after you make the dough and take it from the mixer,allow it to rise on the counter for the 30 minutes.

    Then portion your doughnuts and place them on a tray, and into he freezer.

    YES I said freezer.

    Here's the tricky part. You'll need to create a par amount based on sales of your doughnuts.

    Take that many out each day before service and place in a warm area to thaw.

    Since they are small they will thaw quickly.

    Figure out timing through trial and error to see how long it takes for them to thaw and raise the way you need them to be.

    I do this with flatbread dough and it works well.

    After a while you'll be able to know how many doughnuts you'll need to thaw and work with.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2016
  4. freshbaked

    freshbaked

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    Thank you for this information. I will definitely give this a shot. After the dough is pulled from the freezer and rises to the spec I am looking for, could I hold them in the fridge to prevent overproofing? Or do you think it will cause the dough to lose its proof?