Residual verdigris on copper

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I found a great deal at an antique mart - this heavyweight copper bowl.  I've been scrubbing, trying copper remover, vinegar, salt, lemon, and have it in pretty good shape except for this residual verdigris.

Safe to use for egg whites?  I would think so... 

 
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If salt and vinegar/lemon doesnt take it off it's supposed to be there. That bowl will be fine for egg whites.
 
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@kokopuffs    Available at most fine automotive stores?  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif
I got mine at AutoZone and you can probably get it at Wallys for $5 a small can or le$$.  And please use microfiber cloths for both the application and polishing, one dedicated cloth for each operation.
 
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I think I'd just cook rather than working that hard making the copper shiny. But that's just me...
 
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As the owner of numerous copper pots and pans, I'd have to agree with Brian. After too many attempts at keeping them shiny, I've decided that dull but used is the better option for me. Of course, if company is coming over and I plan to use a pan to set on the table, then I'll take the trouble. But otherwise, the egg whites will whip just fine either way. 
 
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I would be concerned about using an automotive product on a bowl made for preparing food.

I just left a job where for 18 years it was the housekeepers responsibility to polish the copper and silver, every couple of days.

If I was whipping egg whites and needed bowl, I would always splash either vinegar or lemon juice on a cloth and wipe off the oxidation from the bowl before continuing on.

By the looks of the picture above, it would seem that some of the copper has been scratched off near the rim. I don't believe that should have any bearing on the ability of the bowl. I think it is good to use....
 
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Thanks for all the input and experience.  I was also having a few thoughts about the automotive product and realized that I didn't really care if it was shiny, just safe.  I took a little Bar Keeper's friend to it and now....    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

 
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Those who know me have heard this before so they can feel free to skip the lecture lol.

Please don't shop for kitchen tools and such at home improvement stores.

Yes I see Alton Brown doing it on TV .. but that does not make it safe and I always wonder why the legal depts of the various channels have not put a stop to it.

You never know what an item is made of or treated with and how it could react to acids or heat or even water.

This is one of my nitemares...ask anyone who works the docks loading and unloading container ships how often the crane gives and the container drops causing a few boxes inside to split and leak ...do you really think they ALWAYS pressure wash and decontaminate them before they are reused?

I am sure all of you have heard of the infant formula from China that was recalled due to something or other being added to save money and babies were getting sick.

Recalls happen every day...on purpose or accident the outcome can be the same.

My fisherman does not just fish.

He has been in and around chemical plants and oil refineries his entire adult life and has come home with some tragic stories re a lab rat who didn't read a label or follow SOP (as in wearing the proper PPDs) and poured something or other down the sink and created a toxic gas or at the very least started a fire or splashed something in his/her eyes.

Some of those chemicals are under our kitchen sinks....in small amts but it only takes a small amt...

I realize we cannot go thru life being paranoid but if there is just ONE thing you can do to take the burden off wouldn't it be worth the time and money?

I agree it is highly unlikely to happen to you in the safety of your own home but there is always always the chance that it could happen to you and not that guy in Illinois.

If you don't protect your family who will?

Off the soapbox.

mimi
 
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@flipflopgirl     I agree with your general sentiment but I'm not sure to which element of the thread it relates.  Could you please explain?  Thx.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif
 
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Oh geez....

Thirty years ago I was a lowly apprentice and one of my many duties was to keep the copper cookware shiny. Now, there was a "secret recipie" of salt, vinegar and flour that you used as a polishing past, and it did work well. Since I was always loaded up with more important tasks that involved actual cooking I cleaned the copper the "lazy way"

I'd fill a sink (or steam kettle) one third full of water, add in a salt brine and vinegar. Sometimes I 'd use leftover pickle brine which has both salt and vinegar, in any case, toss in the pots, let 'em soak for a good hour, then rinse, wash, and dry very thoroughly. This works great for regular (daily) cleaning, but if the pot has scorched on debris or grease, you have to use elbow grease first to remove, then soak.

Barkeepeer's works great, but is mostly oxalic acid, and you still have to scrub....
 
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Barkeepeer's works great, but is mostly oxalic acid, and you still have to scrub....
It was 95% clean with just vinegar and salt.  I used Bar Keeper's on a couple of residual spots.    I like the pickle brine recycling.  
 
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@flipflopgirl     I agree with your general sentiment but I'm not sure to which element of the thread it relates.  Could you please explain?  Thx.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif
 
I highly highly recommend an automotive product called BLUE MAGIC METAL POLISH CREAM.  With a little elbow grease it'll leave a brilliant shine like new.
Took a min but found the MSDS and not to be ingested.

Sure you can prolly remove it all from the surface but nothing to guarantee it won't seep into the item you are cleaning.

Why take the chance...my usual motto.

mimi
 
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That is a beautiful bowl. 

Have you tried Copperbrill?  I have several copper bowls, some newer and some that are many decades old.  Copperbrill removed the verdigris on my copper rather nicely.  Just apply with a dampened sponge or cloth and let set for a few minutes and then rub the area with the same sponge or cloth.  Rinse with warm water.  Repeat.    It should begin to remove the verdigris.  But, you should understand that it could take several applications to remove most of it or even see a different.  Persistence is key. 

It works best when the copper has been warmed slightly.  Not hot.  A bath in warm water before application should be all you need.   After you are done, simple wash with gentle soap and warm water. 

You may be able to purchase Copperbrill at a brick and mortar Bed, Bath and Beyond or Williams Sonoma.  You can definitely purchase on line if you don't mind waiting. 

Good luck.
 
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The vinegar, salt, a bit of Bar Keeper and my elbow got it into working shape.

I actually already had a nice copper bowl that I use but when wandering through the store I saw this for $36 bucks and it was a no-brainer.  I should have taken a "before" pic but remembering to take photos has never been my strong suit.
 

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