Removing silver skin from ribs?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by sergio71, May 23, 2012.

  1. sergio71

    sergio71

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    I was watching Guy Fieri on tv the other night showing how to cook ribs. But before he started, the first thing he did was remove the "silver skin" off the back of the racks. I had no idea that there was a skin there that was supposed to be removed before cooking ribs. Is this true? Should I be removing this skin the next time I pop a few racks in the oven? Sorry about what may be a silly question but I am really interested in hearing what some of you have to say.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2012
  2. cavegirl

    cavegirl

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    Yep. You need to remove the membrane to ensure your delicious rub or sauce gets into the meat. Google for youtube demo. There's also the mouth feel to having the membrane intact ... like eating cellophane.
     
  3. greg

    greg

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    Ideally you remove it by peeling back a corner of it at one end then strip it off with pliers. Alternatively, you can score it with a knife at a 45 degree angle to the bone in both directions (creating a diamond pattern). Cooking the ribs will then shrink the membrane so it's not an issue.
     
  4. mano

    mano

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    Don't know how Fieri did it, but lift an edge of the silver skin and pinch it with a paper towel and pull it off. If there's membrane on the front, take that off by dragging a knife edge cross wise.
     
  5. chefedb

    chefedb

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    The Silver on all meats is tough and should come off.  On larger cuts like filets the silver has a set direction. If you pull it one way it tares the meat the other way it comes right off.Dont try to peel threads of it off , take a sharp knife and run it up and under fairly wide area keeping blade slanted slightly upward to avoid cutting into meat.
     
  6. sergio71

    sergio71

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    Thanks to all for the information. I will definitely remove it next time. All these years cooking ribs, both in the oven and on the grill, and I never knew this membrane should be removed. Great feedback, thanks again.
     
  7. rbandu

    rbandu

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    I worked at a BBQ/Brewpub place once and we always took the skins off the ribs.  I didn't quite understand it at the time, as you could just cross-cut the undersides and the membranes would curl up on their own...but a membrane-free rib is indeed a pleasure to eat.
     
  8. duckfat

    duckfat

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    I  lift the membrane at one end and then grab it with a bar towel and peel. Like pulling the skin of eel or Tuna.

    Dave
     
  9. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I slip a butter knife down one of the ribs at the end. This lifts the skin a bit. Then grab hold using a paper towel to enhance the grip, and peel it off. Sometimes it tears and you have to repeat it a bit.

    There's some other trimming that can benefit a spare rib depending what the butcher may or may not have done. There's a "brisket" flap where the silver skin ends that should be trimmed off. Sometimes this is removed and sometimes not in the cryovac packs I usually buy. It's hard to remove the silverskin on this flap but it's a piece I usually season and smoke as well.

    There's also a lot of cartilaginous structure on the long edge opposite the bone edge. It's not hard to eat or cut through if you want to cook the rib whole, but the rib presents better and is easier to eat if you trim this down in the manner of the St. Louis cut. Or you can just follow the bottom edge of the bones but that can make one end of the rack a little skimpy. Again, this trimmed piece is still good eating seasoned and smoked. Youtube will have pictures of this as well.