Reheating Hollandaise Sause

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by handofike, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. handofike

    handofike

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    Hi,

    I hope someone can help, I'm going to be making Eggs Benedict for someone special on Saturday, I'm not confident to make my own Hollandaise just yet (and it's not going to be my kitchen) so I've bought some good quality sauce in a jar....

    Can someone tell me the best way to reheat it to serve?

    Many thanks

    Ike
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    The jar should have directions.

    However, I think the concept of good quality hollandaise in a jar is self contradictory.  And you can't really reheat hollandaise. What's in the jar can probably be reheated but it I doubt you'll get support for it being a real hollandaise.

    Hollandaise isn't really hard. Make it, strain it to remove the imperfect parts and move on. You'll get better making it with only a little practice.
     
  3. handofike

    handofike

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    Your right... I have time, I can do a few test runs at making my own... Keep the jar for backup in case it's a flop.

    Thanks
     
  4. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Many recipes call for 3 yolks. While you're practicing, you can scale it down to save waste. On the other hand that means you have to be more attentive to temperature and whisking.

    I usually only make a small batch based on 1 yolk as i don't need a lot of the sauce.
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I would be remiss if I didn't point out that you can hold hollandaise.

    In the case of Benedict, boil the water for the eggs. Pour some into a thermos to "preheat it". Empty the thermos and add your hollandaise. It will hold for up to an hour (varies by thermos and such). That can simplify things at the end when you want everything perfect and ready to go.
     
  6. handofike

    handofike

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    The thermos idea is great and would certainly take timing pressures off so I can concentrate on making everything else perfect as poss.

    Your a star thanks so much!!
     
  7. chefedb

    chefedb

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    By law(health dept) in some states hollandaise must be discarded after the service. A jar one has stabilizers and i reality is a mock hollandaise so just follow directions on jar for whatever brand Knorr has one way Eno has another
     
  8. deacon

    deacon

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    You will get more satisfaction from using a from scratch hollandaise, otherwise you're just saying "thank you". Hollandaise is a base recipe. If you have any culinary intuitive, you can make it flawlessly everytime. Just follow the basic rules and you'll be fine.
     
  9. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    I absolutely agree you should make it from scratch. Make your life a lot easier and use raw butter instead of clarified butter. Tastes better (of butter...) and much quicker to make. Just try and see.

    - Use 2 eggyolks (1 eggyolk is difficult to work with, 3 may be too much for 2 persons), add 2 not too full tbsp of water and a teaspoon of lemonjuice. Whisk without warming, just to mix.

    - put on a low fire and whisk the mixture vigorously until all fluid has disappeared and the mixture is almost doubled in volume. Important; put on quite a low fire and take the pan on and of the fire while doing this to avoid making an omelette.

    - add some cold butter in small cubes (10-15mm size), 50-75 gram is more than enough! From the fire; whisk butter in a few at  time. Put on/off the fire again if needed, careful or it will split. 

    Add s&p and a few more drops of lemonjuice if needed. Don't worry about temperature., a Hollandaise is served luke-warm.

    Really no more than 5-10 minutes to make, depending how good you are at whisking and how high you allow the heating to be (don't be too much of a dare devil with the heat).

    Also, make sure your butter cubes are standby. Leaving the eggmixure in a hotpan while doing something else is not advised. The eggs will cook further in the still very hot pan.

    Enjoy!
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  10. timg

    timg

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    Hi,

    It only takes 5 minutes to make hollandaise using direct high heat.  A fully cooked hollandaise can be reheated in warm water.
     
  11. duckfat

    duckfat

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    Hollandaise should be made from clarified butter. If you are not clarifying the butter you are using the solids which will give you a different texture. While this may still be better than mixes or pre-made products why cut corners if you are going to make sauce from scratch? The only reason "raw" butter would taste different is if you are using the "solids" from salted butter.

    Any one starting with Hollandaise should use a double boiler to make their sauce instead of trying to cook directly over a heat source. Makes life a lot easier until you refine your technique.

    Any Jar or Knorr-swiss mix has enough stabilizer that you can hold it right in a bain-marie.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  12. wineandfood

    wineandfood

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    But if you ARE going to use the jar Hollandaise, I would try heating it slowly in a double boiler. And, I'd do a dress rehearsal this week before the big gig, otherwise you may end having to call for a pizza!
     
  13. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I agree clarified butter and melted hot at that. Also a drop of cayenne pepper. I do in a blender
     
  14. augustus

    augustus

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    I am not going to lie.  In school this week, I made hollandaise for the first time.  It is easy.  Just take you time making it and you will love the additional sauces that you can make afterwards once you have mastered making the hollandaise. 
     
  15. uberathlete

    uberathlete

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    You might want to try making cooked hollandaise a la Marco Pierre White. Looks safer. Youtube it.
     
  16. benway

    benway

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    A cook I used to work with would make hollandaise by lighting a sterno and placing it under the bowl of a stand mixer.  Pretty clever although not at all applicable when making hollandaise for two.
     
  17. gunnar

    gunnar

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    I had a chef that just used a blowtorch along the sides and bottom
     
  18. chefwa

    chefwa

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    hollandaise is a dangerous sauce due to the raw eggs. i wouldnt hold it for more than 40mins.I am a professional chef with my red seal and ccc. so ya i know. Also i made a 96 on the redseal so if anyone has any problems getting ready for it maybe i can help
     
  19. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Hm, guess I've been making it wrong all these years /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif, yes, the egg yolks a raw when I start but I don't think they are raw when I finish, 5-10 minutes at 140°F or slightly higher, and I use hot clarified butter.
     
     
  20. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I would guess that you are fresh out of culinary school, as your second post brags about your qualifications  "I am a professional chef with my red seal and ccc. so ya i know. Also i made a 96 on the redseal" 
     

    Hollandaise is going to kill you.   That's another one of those things that the food police have instilled in you  . I have been making it for 30 years and no one has gotten sick or died from it.

    I'm all about food safety, good hygiene and sanitation in the kitchen, but when the health dept is going to dictate how and what we cook, I draw the line.

    I'll have my beef rare with hollandaise please.