Reduction sauces

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by pj, Aug 19, 2000.

  1. pj

    pj

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    I would like some recipes on reduction sauces for meats. Can't seem to find what I am looking for. Anybody got some great steak reduction sauce recipes?
     
  2. greg

    greg

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    A balsamic vinegar reduction works well. Just cook it down till syrupy, add sugar to taste and you're set. Don't use a cheap balsamic; Ca D'Este is a good middle-of-the-road brand.
     
  3. pj

    pj

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    Dear Chef Greg,

    Thank you for the recipe. Where can I find this brand of balsamic vinegar Ca D'Este? I will try the recipe as soon as I get a good balsamic vinegar to use as you suggested.

    Thanks a bunch

    [This message has been edited by PJ (edited August 18, 2000).]
     
  4. wambly

    wambly

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    You can do any brown sauce as a reduction .. you just need to use a good gelatinous stock.
    I have used balsamic as well but I take the vinegar reduction and add it to an espagnole (reduced veal stock).

    One I have used latley is a Hunter style ..
    Saute shallot and onion, add mushrooms (any type or mix), add garlic, deglaze with red wine, add espagnole and reduce to nape, add tomato conccasse, season to taste.

    Also a good seller (in Texas anyway) is 'Diablo' -- saute shallots, add garlic, deglaze with red wine, add espagnole and reduce to nape, season with black, white, and cayenne pepper to taste.( I use a 'cajun ratio':1 bp to 1/2 wp to 1/4 cayenne)

    Both of those sauces are based off of classic French but use reduction in place of a roux.
    We did nothing but reductions in the early eighties .. nouvelle cuisine at it's best, and most expensive [​IMG]


    [This message has been edited by Wambly (edited August 19, 2000).]
     
  5. chefjohnpaul

    chefjohnpaul

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    This one I received from my mentor Richard Thompson, who got it from his mentor Maurice Peuget former chef of MAXIM'S in Paris.

    Brown off beef/veal scraps w/shallots deglaze with a little red wine vinegar, reduce au sec, add red wine, thym, bay- reduce by half, add demi-glace, bring to a simmer and simmer for about 1 to 1 1/2 hrs.
    Strain. Cool. Refridgerate. The next day this sauce is much better, I think the tanins mellow in the presence of the meat proteins when left till the next day, and the flavors seem to marry nicely, but wow! Is this a good sauce. Kind of a variation on Bordelaise.
     
  6. pj

    pj

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  7. pj

    pj

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    Thank you ChefJohnPaul,

    I am so thrilled to get these recipes, and I know what I will be doing this week. Experimenting with these sauces. I love sauces, and I think a sauce makes a steak, or chop and veal, chicken so much more exciting and favorful. Not to mention the presentation is gives the dish. I Appreciate you responding.

    Pj
     
  8. greg

    greg

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    I've found Ca D'Este in a wine store that also has a gourmet deli. I imagine that any Italian market or gourmet food store would carry this. It's a 4 year balsamic that tastes much older.

    [This message has been edited by Greg (edited August 20, 2000).]
     
  9. pj

    pj

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    Chef Greg,

    Thanks, again for the information. Will certainly look for this balsamic vinegar tomorrow.
    Pj
     
  10. pj

    pj

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    Greg,

    I found the Ca D' Este (finally!) I searched in many stores, but finally got lucky. I am doing the reduction sauces tomorrow for sure. Still fighting a cold. Can you freeze reduction sauces successfully? Pj
     
  11. greg

    greg

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    As a matter of fact, just got the results in today on a frozen reduction sauce. We run venison medallions w/ a tart cherry venison stock reduction every Saturday. Froze the leftovers last week, pulled the sauce out today and it was fine. If we hadn't taken such a gouging on the price of the venison, I'd be much happier, though!

    [This message has been edited by Greg (edited September 02, 2000).]
     
  12. pj

    pj

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    Can't put a price on quality! You wouldn't happen to have that recipe on that sauce whould you? Nice to know you can freeze the sauce though. Thanks for small favors....Pj
     
  13. greg

    greg

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    You can buy the tart cherries two ways: dried (sometimes called chaisins) or canned tart cherries packed in simple syrup. If you buy dried, soak them in brandy or cognac or a good red wine (maybe capechef could recommend something) for a day. After they've reconstituted, strain and save the liquid. Soften minced shallots in a sauce pan, deglaze with the soaking liquid, reduce to a third of the original volume. Add reconstituted cherries and venison stock, reduce again to sauce consistency, swirl in some whole, unmelted butter and season. If you buy the cherries packed in simple syrup, skip the reconstituting step. Take some of the syrup and combine with your choice of cognac, brandy or red wine, and use that to deglaze the pan after softening the shallots. Otherwise, it's the same recipe.
     
  14. live_to_cook

    live_to_cook

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    Wow. Man. I just went online and ordered some dried cherries, I have to make some of that sauce. Thank you for providing the recipe.