Red bean paste assistance

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chefchito, Nov 14, 2003.

  1. chefchito

    chefchito

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    Heyt guys and gals, I have about 1 whole case of korean red bean paste, and I have no idea what to do with it. Can anyone help? PLEEEEZE?
     
  2. mike

    mike

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    Ive seen it used as a sweetened filling for little pastries. I think its made from mung beans. I also once had a sweet mungbean soup at a chinese wedding. Not sure of any savoury dishes though.

    hope helps.
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Isn't that just red miso? Then there are soups and such for using it up.

    Phil
     
  4. pongi

    pongi

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    If korean red bean paste is the same of japanese or chinese red bean paste, it shouldn't be just miso, but sweet adzuki (red soy bean) paste. It's used in China and Japan to fill small pastries or sweet raviolis, as mike said, but also for sweet soups and jellies.

    Pongi
     
  5. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Chito, what does the label on the product say? I have a strong suspicion that this is NOT sweet bean paste, but very, very HOT AND SPICY stuff. Anyway, the red bean paste I get in Korean restaurants is pretty darn spicy. :D If you try to use it as a filling for sweet pastries, boy, are your customers going to be surprised! :eek:

    Anyway, if it really is the spicy stuff, it's a great condiment with grilled meats of all animals, and even raw meat (it's served alongside the Korean version of steak tartare, along with sliced Asian pear :lips: ).

    Let us know if you can figure out its basic flavor profile, and we'll see what else we can come up with.
     
  6. mike

    mike

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    Well done suzanne....always read the label !!
    Did you know that asian pear is the most incredible meat tenderiser if its pureed & used as a marinade.
     
  7. chefchito

    chefchito

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    Sorry It took so long for me to reply, but it has been a bad week.
    the can says..."sweet red bean paste (koshian)
    "choice dessert ingredient"

    So it most likely isn't the hot kind. I can almost always figure out how to use spicy ingredients, but I am no pastry chef. Just a good ole CEC. Thanks everybody.
     
  8. pongi

    pongi

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    OK...Koshi-an, japanese red bean paste.
    I'll dig up some recipes for you :)

    Pongi
     
  9. chefchito

    chefchito

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    Thanks a lot everyone.
     
  10. pongi

    pongi

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    SWEET BEAN GONGS

    Ingredients: for the pancakes:
    -3 large eggs
    -5 1/4 oz sugar
    -1/2 tsp baking soda
    -about 1 2/3 oz water
    7 oz flour

    14 oz red bean paste

    vegetable oil

    Beat eggs in a bowl, add sugar, mix well and beat again with a wisk to the ribbon stage.
    Mix baking soda with 1 tsp water, add to the mixture.
    Add half of the measured water and mix well.
    Stir in the sifted flour, then add the remaining water and mix well the batter.
    Heat a lightly oiled griddle, puor 1 ladle of batter on, making a round shape, and cook until top is bubbling and bottom is golden, then turn it over and cook until dry.
    Cool pancakes down. Spread 7/8 oz red bean paste on a pancake, cover with another and press lightly to secure.


    This is the basic recipe for homemade koshi-an. very easy, and delicious! It reminds me of chestnut jam :lips:

    Ingredients:
    -7 oz red adzuki beans, soaked in cold water overnight
    -1 1/4 cup sugar

    Put adzuki beans in a pot with 1 liter water, bring to the boil and cook, stirring, until they're tender (about 1 hour).
    Drain beans, keep their water, push them thru a sieve, mix the bean paste with the water, add sugar and cook again over a low heat, stirring continuously, until the paste is thick. Cool it down and serve.

    Pongi
     
  11. mrbugsy

    mrbugsy

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    Hi guys!

    I am actually new here. Recently trying to learn Korean cooking. I think what suzanne was referring to is Korean red pepper paste. Yeah, it is quite hot, but you should try the korean chili powder and thats something else.

    You could use the pepper paste on a lot of dishes, mostly marinades and its really, really good! :)

    If you still dont know what to do with your korean bean paste, then maybe you could send some in our direction and will figure out what to do with them! :) jk