Recommendations for an Oyster Knife ??

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by cotswoldcommis, Feb 8, 2017.

  1. cotswoldcommis

    cotswoldcommis

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    Hi All - searched the forums for "Oyster Knife" and could find anything ?? and apologise for yet another "Recommendation for XYZ" thread. Gonna have to Shuck a lot of Oysters as they are on the set menu for Valentines at the restaurant where I work, always one to make my life easier by getting the right tool for the job so am going to invest in an Oyster Knife - so Guy's any recommendations - have been looking at this http://www.steamer.co.uk/tools/fish-tools/wusthof-oyster-knife.html
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Depends on the species and size.  What are you shucking over there?  European flat oyster mostly?  You would want something sharp, thin, and long
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
  3. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    A Sani Safe oyster knife will do the job for much less money. Of equal importance is a chain mail glove if you can find one. Or be sure to wrap the oyster in a towel before applying pressure to the knife. The knife will slip and can cause a nasty jab into your other hand. 

    As with knife skills, good technique before speed. 
     
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  4. cotswoldcommis

    cotswoldcommis

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    Hi Guy's - thanks for the replies, Native Pearl Oysters or Pacific Rocks are what I will be shucking. The Sani Safe looks like it will do the job for 1/2 the $$'s of the Wusthof, although not sure they have a distributor this side of "The Pond". Thanks for the warning about learning the technique properly before trying to go to fast !! Will make sure I wrap the Oysters in a towel at least if I can't find a glove.

    Both myself and the wife like Oysters so I suppose it gives me an excuse to buy some so I can practice :)
     
  5. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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  6. mike9

    mike9

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    I had a Dexter Russell and after using friends New Haven style "curved" tip knife I curved the tip on mine and it's a world of difference let me tell you.  More leverage, easier clean on the shell and a better product overall.  
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2017
  7. someday

    someday

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  8. chefross

    chefross

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    I grew in the in the industry before chain mail gloves, and before learning to take the precautions that cooks do now.

    I did not use a towel the hold the oyster in place, and I never used gloves.

    I have shucked literally thousands if not hundreds of thousands of shells in my career.

    Then, when the health department and serve-saf rules came out, I had to unlearn and relearn how to use the chain mail glove.

    One place made me put a latex glove on with the chain mail glove...that was a disaster.

    IMHO

    It's not the device, it's the technique. Look for a knife that fits in your hand comfortably. Don't buy one without holding it in your hand physically.

    Oh...by the way........heed chefwriter......I've jabbed more times than I care to admit.
     
  9. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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          I'm thinking I should probably explain the towel use. Don't actually wrap the oyster in it. You fold the towel, any standard kitchen towel, and place it over the oyster, leaving only the hinge of the oyster exposed. Then grip the oyster so the towel offers a thick barrier to the space between thumb and forefinger. That will be the landing area for the point of a slipped knife. 

         I should mention that the chain mail glove I'm referring to is actually steel chain mail, not a typical reinforced fabric cut glove. I used one back in 1985 in New Orleans.  The official hotel oyster shucker  had one and I used it only when he wasn't. And he made sure I gave it back. It actually looks pretty bad ass and I'm surprised they aren't more popular with the historical re-enactment crowd. I have no idea where to get one. 
     
  10. cotswoldcommis

    cotswoldcommis

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    Once again thanks for the replies - @Someday  gotta say I do like the look of the Damariscotta Shucker and they ship to the UK so we may have a winner. Thanks for the advice RE : Safe Technique @chefwriter   @Chefross  - er "Happy Shucking"
     
  11. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    These cost $95 at Central Restaurant. Also extremely useful for handling live eels, btw: gives you a tough grip and if the thing bites your finger you can laugh at it.
     
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  12. Ruppert Green

    Ruppert Green

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    You know, an oyster knife is a unique tool. The main purpose of any knife is to cut. And the main function of the oyster knife is to open the shell. Yes, then you need to trim the muscle and separate the clam from the shell wall, but first, you need to manage to get inside. And many who have tried to use a usual knife for this, even a very good kitchen knife, they know: you can be exhausted, injure your hands, break a knife and crush the shell, but you can’t get to the goal. Modern best oyster knives are small, with a short thick blade of sturdy steel, with a thin tip and without a sharp cutting edge. Sometimes they have a special guard that protects the hand from accidental cuts on the sharp edges of the shell. And always they come with a comfortable and reliable handle.

    Experienced écailler (a specialist in the opening of oysters) opens the shell with the help of such a knife in a few seconds. A newcomer will have to sweat because the mollusk squeezes the cover so tightly that when it is opened it takes about as much force as when lifting a three-kilogram dumbbell.
     
  13. dectra

    dectra

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    Couldn't agree more about the glove. Never fails when you're ass deep in oysters, trying to hurry, and next thing you know...hey who's bleeding....oh shit, I am.
     
  14. harrisonh

    harrisonh

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    as mediocre as I think their culinary knives are, dalstrong makes a GREAT oyster knife. Other than that, r murphy and dexter

    Remember there are different styles,