recipe scaling

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cesarzap, Feb 27, 2002.

  1. cesarzap

    cesarzap

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    I will like to know how much is 11/16 of a cup in ounces

    21/16 tablespoons in ounces

    please help
     
  2. mofo1

    mofo1

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    Good God!!! Are you going to count individual grains of salt, too? Seriously, 11/16 cup = 5.5 oz. 21/16 Tablespoon = 1 Tablespoon + just a pinch more. (1 Tablespoon=.5 oz, 1 Teaspoon=1/4 oz. I tried doing the math on this last one but it's too late and very pointless. Please do not feel that you have to follow recipes PERFECTLY. ****, that ain't no fun.:chef:
     
  3. greg

    greg

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    This is fairly easy to do. I'll do the first one for you (because it's easier), as an example. First, you must know how many ounces are in the unit of measure you are converting. 1 cup=8 ounces. Then, divide that by the denominator (the "16" part of the fraction, in this case). This will tell you how much 1/16 is. 8 divided by 16 is 0.5. Multiply 1/16 (0.5)by 11 and you have your answer- 5.5 ounces. Good luck with the second one. One tablespoon= 0.5 ounces.

    Metric is easier, isn't it?
     
  4. monpetitchoux

    monpetitchoux

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    If you have a scale that weighs so accurately and precisely, please let me know where I can get one, too. But only if it converts to metrics and does not involve me adding weights by hand. Besides, may I know what you are weighin gout that needs to be so accurate?
     
  5. momoreg

    momoreg

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    To convert volume to weight, it is essential to take into account what it is you are measuring. For example, a cup of water weighs far more than a cup of cornstarch.

    But as mofo1 mentioned, this sounds like a recipe that been converted either from a HUGE recipe, or just not correctly. 21/16 of a tablespoon is not a way that things are measured. Just like any fractions, the first number should be smaller than the second. So it would be one and a quarter tablespoons, plus a little more.
     
  6. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Go check out a cook's civil service exam. These are exactly the kind of questions they ask. For what I don't know.

    Kuan
     
  7. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Cook's civil service exam???
     
  8. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep, cook's civil service exam. For example, to work at the University of Illinois, you have to go through a long process of applying, taking the exams, attend a session on how to get a job at the University, waiting for your score, waiting till you get to the top of the list, interviewing, take a drug test, joining a union, etc. It's different at different Colleges. At the U of I they had three levels of cook, two levels of supervisor and I think two manager levels. You could take an exam for each level and take them again and again until you achieved a score you liked. All non-faculty staff had to take a civil service exam, whether it was Secretary, Clerk, Maintenance, or whatever.

    Kuan
     
  9. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Kuan, I believe you! Was there a different test for cooks in State prisons and hospitals, or did they use the same one?

    Wow, that's what you get when non-cooks make up exams for cooks; they may test necessary skills, but not real-world uses of those skills. Kind of reminds me of the written test for a driver's license -- who knew that tire-tread depth was measured in 32nds of an inch??
     
  10. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    They're pretty standard within the levels. Most govt. jobs use the same form with minor adjustments so you don't just memorize the answers and ace the test the next time around. The math part, although the least important, filters out a lot of applicants. And then the first day on the job you can't find a measuring cup in that kitchen which covers a whole city block.

    Kuan