Recipe Organization

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Joined Jan 14, 2010
  I often find myself scouring the internet / various other media outlets for recipes.  Well, one thing leads to another and by the time I'm done, I have a vast amount of recipes in various different locations (mainly websites).  My question is simple, that is, would it just be smarter to print out the pages with recipes, or tediously type hundreds of recipes to the same format?  What do you guys / gals do?  

I was kind of thinking of doing as I stated, and then cut out the vital information; test the recipe, and if everyone liked it then I would sort of "scrap book" the pieces onto one sheet, and then put them in a binder dibbied (that's not a word, is it? =P) up by sections.   
 
34
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Joined Jan 14, 2010
 I think I may have asked that wrong....  Let's say I have a couple food blogs I favor, and a ton of recipes within them that I have favorited.  Now, if I wanted tangible copies of those recipes, would you say it would be more efficient / convenient to print out the page from the browser, or type each and every recipe out in a standardized format (seems kind of boring, eh?)?
 
34
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Joined Jan 14, 2010
I would start wtih a webwhack so you don't lose the sources. I've whacked many cooking sites over the years and glad to have done so as many of them don't last all that long. Then the content can be tweaked at my leisure into my preferred storage.

See http://download.cnet.com/HTTrack-Website-Copier/3000-12512_4-10039773.html?tag=mncol for the whack tool of my preference. They have linux and I think a mac version too.
Boy, do I wish someone had told me about this before now.  I've lost countless things, but not anymore!!  Thanks.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
 

phatch

Moderator
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9,076
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Joined Mar 29, 2002
It doesn't work on all sites, but most sites yes. Depends a bit on how they serve the pages and manage cookies. Even then, many membership only sites can be whacked by copying over your browser sessions cookies to HTTrack. At least that's how it is in my memory though I've not done that in a while. 
 
6,367
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Joined Feb 1, 2007
Let me take a different tack.

Full disclosure: Among other things, I'm technologically a dinosaur and do not trust either my computer nor the internet. Take it for what it's worth.

I'm also a dinosaur in another way: I not only use, I like recipe cards.

However, I use all sorts of sources for recipes and inspiration. The internet, and cookbooks, and magazines, and pass-ons. Even only identifying the recipes you think you might like to try, someday, you are soon lost in a jungle of them. 

So, whenever I find a recipe I might like, I immediatly make a hard copy of it. Don't care what format it's in. If the internet, I download it. Magazines get clipped and filed. Books are marked with post-it flags. Etc.

Then, when I do get around to that recipe, I make it, noting any tweaks and changes I make along the way. If I like the final result, I then type it onto an index card, using the format I prefer, including notes to myself about possible additional changes for next time.

Not the best way for everybody, but it works for me.
 

phatch

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Joined Mar 29, 2002
For most of us without a typewriter, index cards don't feed well through printers.

But I keep my recipes mostly in electronic formats. I do have a notebook of recipes in development for making notes in during cooking.  And an older one I used mostly for outdoors cooking until the required tweaks became habit
 
6,367
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Joined Feb 1, 2007
Really, Phil? Hunh. I've owned three printers in the past two dozen years and everyone of them came with a card feed.

What doesn't work well, I've found, is trying to have them feed from a stack. No matter what the manufacturers say, that doesn't work. But running them one at a time works just fine.
 

phatch

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Joined Mar 29, 2002
I must buy the wrong stuff for that, laser printers only. Theoretically they'd do envelopes for addressing   but it was a one at a time feed and iffy. Most of my printing though was high volume runs for the different editing proofs for the manuals I wrote.

That's all electronic now and while there is an ink jet on my network, I haven't printed from my computer in over 10 years. All electronic delivery now.
 
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Joined Jun 5, 2009
I  use a program called Big Oven.  It lets me type in a recipe, import it from the web, or import from my printer which works as a scanner.  To import from the web, I bring the recipe up on screen and highlight it, right click of the mouse to copy.  Next open Big Oven, if it is not already, and click on the edit icon and select screen import.  I next highlight various parts of the recipe and identify them as title, source, ingredients, directions, etc.  When done simply select the import button.  You're done.  To find the ones that I entered and differentiate them from those supplied by the program I add one or two tags such as "Favorite" or a tag for a source such as "Food Network" .  This lets me view only those recipes with that particular tag.
 
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Joined Dec 29, 2007
 Why don't you copy them and paste them onto a blank document. I do that and keep them in a folder on my Macbook.
 
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Joined Feb 24, 2009
Avery now has a 9 x11 sheet with recipe cards that feeds through your printer just as card stock does.  the trick is using a program like  MS word with the avery add on so that it knows where to print things. 

The old ones had rough edges but now they have ones with more smooth softer edges. 
 
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112
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Joined Nov 16, 2009
type them in a file, or save the internet recipe file.
but the file name should be the recipe name.
and you have different folders for categories to organize the files.
 

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