Recipe for Pot stickers

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by homemadecook, Apr 30, 2010.

  1. homemadecook

    homemadecook

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     Hello!

    Does anybody here knows the recipe for pot stickers? and their sauce?
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    There are myriad variations on this concept.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...rs-with-spicy-dipping-sauce-recipe/index.html  is one version from Martin Yan. He's done many different ones over the years.

    I make it by eye and use ingredients like these, but there are so many variations possibilities are limitless

    ground pork
    a little ground shrimp
    a little corn starch
    soy sauce
    sesame oil
    a little minced garlic and ginger.
    Some finely chopped vegetables, stir fried and cooled--like onion, cabbage, carrot.
    Round wonton skins

    Fill, seal and pan fry till browned on the bottom. Pour in water to about 1/4 inch and cover, let steam until the water is gone.



    Sauce, again I go by eye and taste.

    Minced ginger
    Black vinegar
    soy sauce
    a little sugar
    Something hot. could be chile garlic paste, sweet chile sauce, chile oil. Often left on the side for people to mix to their desired intensity on the plate
     
  3. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Pot stickers (or Gyoza, in Japanese) are as much about the shape of the dumpling as the filling---which, as Phil points out, is primarily a mixture of port or pork & shirmp, with veggies.

    To fill and shape them, put a rounded teaspoon of the filling in the center of a round won ton wrapper. Wet the edge and bring it up to form a vertically oriented half moon. That is, the seam will be centered on the top.

    Next pleat the seam. Traditionally, five folds go into making the pot sticker shape. These are then fried in an all but dry skillet until the bottom are brown and crisp (thus, pot stickers, dontchasee), water or other liquid is added and the skillet immediatly covered so that steam both completes the cooking process and releases the dumplings from the skillet.

    If eyeballing doesn't do it for you, here's a recipe to try. It's actually a Shui Mai filling, but works just as well for Gyoza:

    2 medium carrots, grated coarsely
    2 tbls coarsely grated ginger
    2-3 garlic cloves, minced
    1 lb ground pork
    1/2-1 lob fiely chopped shrimp
    2 tbls thinly sliced scallions
    2 egg whites, lightly beaten
    4 tbls oyster sauce
    1 tbls Sherry
    1 tbls sesame oil
    1 tbls fish sauce
    Splash soy sauce
    Salt & pepper to taste

    Combine carrots, ginger, garlic and scallions. Toss with shrimp to combine evenly.

    Combine egg whites with the oyster sauce, Sherry, sesame oil, fish sauce, soy sauce, salt & pepper.

    In a large bowl combine the veggie/shrimp mixture with the ground pork until evenly distributed. Add liquid mixture and combine well. Refrigerate at least 1 hour, covered.

    An alternative comes from the Dynasty folks, who make won ton, egg roll, and gyoza wrappers:

    Combine 1/2 pound lean ground pork, turkey, beef, or chicken, or 3/4 pound medium shrimp, shelled, deveined & finely chopped, 1 cup shredded green cabbage, 2 green onions, choped, 1 clove garlic, pressed, 2 tablespoons soy sauce, 1 tablespoon cornstarch, and 1/2 teaspoon minced fresh ginger. Mix well.

    Using 1 rounded teaspoon, filling makes about 3-dozen gyoza
     
  4. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Interesting, and all this time I thought "potstickers" (gyoza) were "browned" because the steaming water evaporated and they began to caramalize. So much for listening to "fables" about how dishes were created. ;)
     
  5. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Pete, I'd say that the final result is the same. That is, a caramelized bottom and steamed sides and filling.

    But if the caramelization was post-steaming there'd be no need to pan fry them initially. Plus, of course, there's the question of getting them to release.
     
  6. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    No argument /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif, in fact, one of the local Chinese restaurants offers "extra crispy", in other words, after steaming, into the deep fryer!
     
  7. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Now that one I don't understand at all. If you want them extra crispy just deep fry them to begin with. What's the point of steaming them first?

    I suspect, too, that a deep fried dumpling would have a different name in China or wherever. Pot stickers, as we know them, originated in Mongolia.
     
  8. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    Crispy Won Ton anyone
     
  9. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've used the Wonton skins successfully. Making your own dough is better, certainly. You get the nice form fit as is your picture.
     
  10. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Strange, I've used commercial won ton and gyoza skins for years. Maybe I just didn't realize that they weren't working? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
  11. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I suppose wonton skins will work too.  You don't get the crisp bottom and soft chewy dough texture.
     
  12. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Have you ever actually tried them, Kuan? Or are you just echoing conventional wisdom? Using won ton wraps I get a very crisp bottom and soft, chewy sides.

    Using fresh dough, because it's softer, accomplishes two things. First, as Phil mentioned, the dough hugs the filling closer. And, second, it's a bit easier to form the pleats, because there's no danger of the dough drying out and cracking as sometimes happens with won tons.

    But fresh-made dough and commercial won tons, once the dumpling is formed, cook exactly the same. At least they do in my experience, and I've been making them both ways for a long, long time.
     
  13. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't think we're talking about the same texture.   Potstickers are made using a hot water dough.  The dough is rolled out thicker than a wonton wrapper.
     
  14. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Do you know how to do the "rolling" where they smear it into the circle with the knife blade?
     
  15. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't know the knife blade method.  I use the small wooden rolling pin method.  Palm of hand on the dough, rotate and roll.
     
  16. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    That one's always evaded me too. I've seen video, but it's always been a pro demo, not a teaching thing so it happens too fast.
     
  17. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    I had a Vietnamese friend in college- we lived in an international dorm- who came home with me one weekend. She showed me and my mom how to make the dough and steam the dumplings. I sure wish I could remember her recipe, but I'm almost positive we used boiling water for the dough.... but did we add some flour other than wheat flour? I can't remember!
     
  18. homemadecook

    homemadecook

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     Wow, you're all very helpful! Thank you so much!

    So do you all think it's better to fry them directly after wrapping or do I have to steam them first and them deep fry them?
     
  19. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Well, as I said before, if you're going to deep fry them I see no reason for steaming at all.

    If you're goal is to make pot sticker (as opposed to fried dumplings), you heat the skillet, add a little oil, and put the dumplings in so just the bottoms are fried. Then you add water (usually, but sometimes other liquid), cover the skillet, and let them steam until the water evaporates and the dumplings are cooked through.