Reading recipes.

63
16
Joined May 2, 2016
I was digging through recipes a while back and came across a pack of dough and baking recipes. They're not written in basic everyday recipe format that I now have become use to reading. With the measurements telling cups, tbsp or Tsp. And I have not had to use this in a while and was hoping someone could give me a quick breakdown on how to read these again. The one I am using for example is a Pizza Dough recipe.

Amount Item
3-10 Water
0-1.5 Yeast
6-0 Bread Flour
0-1 Salt
0-2 Sugar
0-4 Olive Oil
Method-Straight dough method.

Would appreciate if anyone could give me a breakdown on proper way to read these recipes again. All i could remember was it is in weight. But in all the recipes even ones using liquids it is same format. I am not really clicking on if thats correct since measuring liquids in weight does not seem correct.
Thanks again.
 
1,959
641
Joined Jan 8, 2010
Not sure at all but I will give it a bit of a try:
If they are weight, it could be proportions.
A fairly standard recipe would have 60-65% water as compared to flour, about 1.5-2% salt
Maybe first figure pounds, second ounces?
Haven't worked it out as I am imperially challenged....
 
3,040
552
Joined May 5, 2010
Oh I recognize this immediately. I used to do that as a baker years ago.

Butzy you're right on

3# 10 ounces water
1.5 ounces yeast
6# bread flour (about 12 cups)
1 ounce salt
2 ounces sugar
4 ounces olive oil
 
63
16
Joined May 2, 2016
May be a rather dumb question. But would you weigh liquids the same as solids or is there an alternative method to it?
 
1,959
641
Joined Jan 8, 2010
I would.
Just put a vessel/cup/container on the scale. Zero the scale and of you go.
Weighing is very accurate.
You could go by volume as well. Easy for water In the metric system. 1 litre water equals 1 kg. This does not apply to other liquids like oil though.
But why would you want to?
I would recommend weighing, esp for baking
 
4,565
793
Joined Aug 21, 2004
Haven't worked it out as I am imperially challenged....
Don't mean to hijack the thread, but sometimes I just can't help myself. Feel free to ignore me, my wife does, ...but what is the correct way to weigh whey? The English language is a close second to the Imperial and US customary measurement systems in being challenging. :~)
 
Last edited:
63
16
Joined May 2, 2016
Much appreciate the help and responses. I am not that good at using the metric system. So ill just stick to the US systems.
 
1,959
641
Joined Jan 8, 2010
No worries. That will work just fine.
But weigh, don't use volume.
And if you get recipes in volumes, check carefully if they are using the American or British imperial system ;)
 
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