Ras Malai

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by kokopuffs, Nov 28, 2004.

  1. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I would like a recipe for this Indian dessert, please.

    tia,
    -K :bounce:
     
  2. scott123

    scott123

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    There are basically two camps for rasmalai:

    Easy (Use ricotta, not as good)

    Authentic(Make your own paneer cheese, time consuming, best quality)

    Take your pick
     
  3. hele

    hele

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    Hi kokopuffs!
    Go to www.google.com, search key ras malai/rasmalai - hundreds of recipes. From basic home recipe to gourmet.

    hele
     
  4. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    That's what I should have done in the first place. Mmmmmmm. Those recipes look great, too.

    It seems that cottage cheese could be substituted in place of lemon or vinegar added to milk. For that's how cottage cheese is actually made, I believe.

    Is ricotta cheese the same as cottage cheese?
     
  5. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Kokopuffs, ricotta ("recooked") is related to fresh mozzarella. It has a different texture from cottage cheese; my impression is that ricotta is somewhat gritty.
     
  6. hele

    hele

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    Hi kokopuff

    Yes chess to, but life goes on with or without light. In return: summertime sun doesn’t go down at all. So, we get even.
    Landscape is beautiful because its snowing INCESSANLY. I have to put my pans and kettles aside and go out to do some snow Angeles with kids.

    Ciao! hele
     
  7. scott123

    scott123

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    Commercial ricotta and paneer are both made from the same ingredients, the only difference is that block paneer is pressed as it drains.

    Cottage cheese involves a completely different process and shouldn't be used as a coagulating agent for either ricotta or paneer.

    Paneer is precipitated by either vinegar, lemon juice, citric acid, yogurt or buttermilk.

    Btw, according to my Indian friends, a lactic acid precipitant (yogurt/buttermilk) will produce a tender cheese that's more suitable for dessert making.
     
  8. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Scott, are you saying that the fat offered in yogurt or buttermilk makes for a cheese better suited for ras malai?

    The coagulating agent added to milk is some kind of acid: vinegar, lemon juice, citric acid. Are you saying that adding yogurt/buttermilk to milk will cause the milk itself to coagulate?
     
  9. scott123

    scott123

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    Kokopuffs, it's the lactic acid in the yogurt/buttermilk that curdles the milk. The softness comes from the milk being curdled very gently by the lactic acid, as opposed to the other acids that curdle the milk in a harsher way and result in a tougher cheese.

    I've never curdled milk with lactic acid, btw. I'm just relaying what Indian chefs have told me.
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Then I will curdle the milk using yogurt or buttermilk to get a more "delicate" cheese/milkfat product to use for the ras malai. Thanks for the great information.
     
  11. lotuscakestudio

    lotuscakestudio

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    Everyone at my temple uses lemon juice or citric acid for making paneer whether sweet or savory. I only make paneer for savory and use lemon juice. Bring one gallon milk to a boil. Remove from heat. Add 6 tablespoons lemon juice and let separate until there are distinct curds floating in clear whey. After 10 minutes, if it doesn't separate, add another teaspoon or so of lemon juice and bring to a boil.

    To press, I first strain the whey out with 1 thickness of fine cheesecloth over a strainer. I made a form out of 2 tofu containers (one is too weak) and poked holes at the bottom. I lift the cheesecloth with the curds inside up and place it in the tofu container and pack it in to fit. I have several bowls that the containers fits in perfectly (average cereal bowl) that will hold it up so the rest of the whey can drain. I cover the top with the rest of the cheesecloth, put another tofu container on top with an 8# weight from my scale. I leave it like that for about 45 minutes. And ta-da!
     
  12. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Lotus:

    THANKS MUCHLY!!! Since I left the computer geeque field I now teach chemistry to inner city kids in Valdosta, Georgia. Teaching is the toughest job on this planette but I love the kids, their style and raw spirit. Soul pervades every corner.

    Your procedure is something I seek to use in my kitchen and may well use for a class demonstration in order to link chemistry to the kitchen itself. And I invite more members to provide procedures for Ras Malai, especially more detailed instructions using yogurt or buttermilk as a lemon juice/vinegar replacement as equally detailed as yours.

    thanks,

    -T
     
  13. mikelombardy

    mikelombardy

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    I Just Like Food
    And for the extra temptation don't forget to add a tinge of saffron..
    My favorite sweet -- ras malai. I remember stealing it from fridge at 12o clock at night when mom was asleep:)