Rabbit in a mustard sauce

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by chrisbelgium, Oct 17, 2011.

  1. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    We have a fantastic rabbit with dried prunes and dark beer stew in my country, but this time I made this rabbit and mustard dish, something you would find more in France and even Spain.

    It's not a stew but a braise. The difference is that a braise uses much less liquid, this also means that your pan or pot has to be quite large to arrange the pieces side by side, never on top of each other. So, in fact, braising is ideal for people who want to prepare just a few pieces, like only legs or so.

    So the dish should be called braise rabbit in mustardsauce, braised Belgian endives and a vegetable mix of potato, turnip and carrot.

    Vegetables (potato/turnip/carrot mix); start with the veggies, they have to cool anyway to proceed and... please DO save the cooking water, we will use that as a light vegetable stock! Cut potato, turnip and carrots in the shapes you want. Put in salted not too hard boiling water for 20 minutes, depending on the size of your chunks.

    Keep some of the cooking water that now tastes like a light veggie stock and let put the veggies aside to cool entirely.

    Belgian endives; this is my favorite way of preparing them. Simply fry them shortly in butter, on their whole, in a cooking pot, in which they fit side by side, not stacked. Season well with s&p and nutmeg. Pour in some plain water (approx. 1 finger high). Make a "cartouche" or in plain words, tear or cut a piece of parchement paper and push straight on top of the endives. Best to make a small hole in the paper. Additional, put the pot's lid on, reduce the fire to low and let braise for 45-60 minutes. Turn the endives a few times but not to often. They should come out soft and caramelized like in the picture.

    Rabbit; time to use your nice castiron pots! Fry the pieces in sunflower oil for quite a long time (15 minutes-ish) on medium high fire. Season well with s&p. Remove the meat. Now put in some chopped shallots and garlic to taste and let fry. Add a small tbsp of plain flour and let fry a bit. Add a good dash of white wine, stir well and let cook until the alcohol is complete gone (you notice when the smell changes). Put the meat back in and immediately add a 2 fingers high amount of the cooking water of the veggies, stir well. Reduce the fire to low and let braise for 90 minutes or until nicely done. Turn the pieces only a few times if necessary.

    Remove the meat, add a small dash of cream, add a tbsp of plain Dijon mustard ànd as much grainy mustard as you wish. Add chopped parcely.

    Fry the potato/turnip/carrot mix in a little sunflower oil. Serve.

    (click image to enlarge)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    This is a beautiful dish, can I come over for dinner?  What do you call this dish?  I love the braised endives.
     
  3. shnooky

    shnooky

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    I've had rabbit before but never in this kind of mustard sauche, it looks delicious though. The braised endives look like they go great with it.
     
  4. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Thanks KK. I would call the dish simply "Rabbit in mustardsauce with braised Belgian endives". These endives are indeed so nice and you can do a lot of things with it. But braising them for a very long time brings the sweetness out, which combines so well with the remaining bitter taste. It's easy to make, I hope a lot of people try it.
     
  5. indygal

    indygal

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    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/frown.gif   Oh No!   I raise (angora) rabbits.  I cannot imagine putting Fluffy in the Dutch oven.  I've had hundreds of rabbits come through here and I have still never tasted domestic rabbit.  When I was a kid, my uncles killed wild rabbit and remember my mother hated cleaning them because the buckshot drove fur into the meat.   I guess I tasted it then, but I don't remember it.

    I'm not opposed to eating them.  I gave my culls to a local Christian homeless shelter, and they did the deed humanely.  It helped contribute to the resident's protein intake and maybe saved the shelter some $$.   I just don't want to raise a rabbit to trust me, and then betray it's trust like that.  (angoras have to be groomed, so they have to be trained from the litterbox to be handled a lot).     I always gave them young ones, by the time they were 3 mo. old, it was obvious which ones were going to be good woolers.    

    I've considered getting silky (flightless) chickens.  They would eat the bugs out of the rabbit droppings, and prevent disease in the summer.   But they are kind of small.   I think I could "do the deed" on those. And I get a LOT of mileage out of a bird.
     
  6. luxon17

    luxon17

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    That looks very good
     
  7. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    That's kind of ironic, IndyGal. We're on the other end, looking right now into raising meat rabbits.

    Why? Well, have you seen the retail prices? Around here they get $5-8/lb. And that's for frozen rabbits.

    Near as I can determine, so far, there's nobody raising them either in my country or in surrounding counties. So there's likely a market for them.
     
  8. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    In Madrid, fresh cleaned rabbit is 5 or 6 Euros a kilo ... Usually served with garlic sauteed in olive oil and white wine with herbs and spices. I cannot personally  however, though most recipes that work with chicken breasts or quail shall work with rabbit. It is cheaper than chicken and many say, it is a clean white meat as rabbits are vegetarians. Hares on the other hand, are carniverous and have a dark dark meat, used alot in stews here in Madrid.  
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  9. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    As mentioned, in Madrid, Spain rabbits cleaned and fresh are sold throughout the city for 5 to 6 Euros a kilo ... $1.66 USD is One Euro. They prepare in white wine, and saute in garlic with spices and herbs, similar to chicken ... Cheap in Kentucky ... Good business I believe since nobody else is doing it. Need to speak to the restaurateurs and hoteliers ... Good luck. Margcata
     
  10. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    I've never heard that hares were carnivores, Margcata. American hares, such as Snowshoes, certainly aren't.

    Be that as it may, rabbit and chicken recipes are interchangeable. Taste and texture won't always be the same, of course, especially since rabbit is firmer fleshed. But any recipe for one will work with the other.

    Price, of course, is a matter of availability, demand, and popularity. Because rabbit is not as popular in America as it is in Europe, it's just not widely available. So prices are high.

    Normally I don't mind paying a premium for a specialty food. But eight bucks a pound for what amounts to being chicken is a bit more than a premium. It's extortionate, IMO. Only thing worse is the price of goose in this country.
     
  11. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Our posts must have crossed.

    How do you figure 6 Euros to be cheap in Kentucky. That works out as US$3.98/pound, versus the $8.00/lb I just saw it being sold for. And that's not even for fresh! Who knows when those rabbits were killed and frozen?

    Don't get me wrong. I love rabbit. I'm just not going to pay that kind of money for one, especially not when shotshells are about a dime each.
     
  12. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    I believe it should be between 4.50 and 6 Euros a kilo Fresh rabbit, not frozen from all Central Markets and Butchers in the hyper or large Supermkts. ... In Spain it is less than 5 or 6 Euros a kilo ... Re.check. Margcata from Madrid.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  13. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    I have been told hares are carniverous as they are wild, and do go after smaller rodents. By no means am I an expert in this variety of game ... Just had been told during a conversation. Maybe this person was mistaken, however, he is a wkend hunter and sells some of his game to the Bars for tapas. However, it is not commonly an Urban meat ... It is a rural staple.

    Yes, rabbit is more common in some European cities. It is sold fresh here in Madrid and the price is between 4.50 to 6 Euros a Kilo not pound. Very few things in Spain are sold via pound system ... Kilo is the preferred system.

    I believe there has been a computer technological problem too ... There are more than one blogger online too. Sorry. Hope this clarifies the price in Spain.
     
  14. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    1 euro = 1.3633 US dollars (as of Nov 20,2011)


    1 euro/kilo * $1.3633/euro = $1.3633/kilo

    $1.3633/kilo*1 kilo/2.2 pounds = $1.3633/2.2 pounds = $0.6197/pound
    Euro/kilo USD/pound
    1.00$0.62
    2.00$1.24
    3.00$1.86
    4.00$2.48
    5.00$3.10
    6.00$3.72
    7.00$4.34
    8.00$4.96
    9.00$5.58
    10.00$6.20
     
  15. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    Thanks for the Euro to Dollar currency rate exchange. I have been living in Europe since the 1990s and truly have forgotten that it was adjusted several years ago. It was originally 1.66 however, it had been lowered.  
     
  16. ishbel

    ishbel

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    The Euro fluctuates against EVERY other currency.
     
  17. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    The point was simply that I used Margcata's provided exchange rate to establish a Spanish cost per pound. No, not that they sell by the pound in Spain, but to create a level playing field. The exact exchange rate is actually irrelevent to the discussion.

    I took 6 Euros (she said 5-6) to make it as expensive as possible. Converted that to dollars (at 1.66 per). The result was that rabbit in Madrid, while expensive, is only about half what it was selling for here in Kentucky.

    Another difference is that any rabbit sold in America is farm-raised. It is illegal to sell wild game here. In Europe things are different, and wild game is a staple of the markets.

    And, before anyone jumps salty, this is not a conservation issue, merely a philosophical difference in how game ownership is percieved. In the U.S. game is seen as belonging to the people as a whole, and therefore subject to government control. Market hunting has been illegal since the early part of the 20th century.

     In Europe, game is seen as belonging to the landowner, who can dispose of it however he feels like---including selling it.
     
  18. ishbel

    ishbel

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    This..
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2011
  19. neptune

    neptune

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    THANK YOU! Thank you, ChrisBelgium!

    We raise rabbits for meat and are always looking for new ways to serve this delicious low fat food.

    I have cooked chickens in various mustard concoctions for years,   but haven't really done it with rabbit before.

    I dunno why not.

    Your plate looks great!

    And @ IndyGal: rabbits are MUCH easier to clean than chickens.

    My next project is learning to preserve the hides....

    We never  name our chickens or our rabbits. They aren't pets.
     
  20. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Where are you located, Neptune?

    Curing the hides, btw, isn't difficult. Just time consuming, depending on the method you choose to use.

    For low volume (not to mention environmental concerns), alum curing is probably your best bet.