quiche formula needed

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by th catering guy, May 23, 2006.

  1. th catering guy

    th catering guy

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    I'm looking for a quiche formula, that can be done in a full sheet pan, and cut into squares, to be served as a nibble before a program--the custard needs to be adaptable to adding things like spinach, sauteed mushrooms, etc...to make my life easier (yeah, right!!). What I'd like to do is to make one pan of one flavor, and another pan of a different flavor...any help would be greatly appreciated...thanxxxxxx...th' catering guy...you can also e-mail me privately if you'd like [email protected] thanxxxxxxxxxx, again.
     
  2. greasechef

    greasechef

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    I normally crack a gallon of eggs (about 60), add a quart of heavy cream, salt and pepper to taste, then mix up. Depending on the filling, I have also been know to add a half cup of sherry at this point. If you add a quart of milk to the above, it will still hold together and give you a bit more, but I prefer it without.

    After that, add whatever you like. If your spinache is frozen, be sure to squeeze out as much water as you can.

    This is basic quick and simple, I am certain somebody else here would do it differently. This recipe should do 1.5 2" hotel pans once you add the extras. I have never done quiche on a sheetpan, sounds like it would be hard to move from the worktable to the oven without spilling. Also, you'd need your oven to be somewhere near level.

    Hope that helps.

    Derek
     
  3. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Same formula as for creme caramel, custard, etc: For every liter of milk 10 eggs, OR for every egg, 1 dl milk. You can substitute part heavy cream or coffee cream for the milk. I like to add a little grated nutmeg and a little worcestershire as well as paprika, S & P to the mix.

    For all vegetables remember this: You don't cook the filling anymore once you add the liquid filling, no matter how hot your oven is. All fillings have to be pre-cooked. Squeeeze out the spinach and saute with onions or whatever, mushrooms have to fully cooked.

    For the crust: Best to use pie dough. Line the sheet pan with baker's/silicone paper FIRST ( if you have a leak, the paper prevents the filling from welding onto the sheet pan...) then lay out your pie dough @ 21/2 mm or 3/16" thick, dock, and pre-bake, preferably the night before. This way you're guaranteed to have a crispy crust.
    No one likes soggy bottoms....
     
  4. aprilb

    aprilb

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    I would tend to agree about the soggy crust in the middle.

    Couldn't you make individual mini quiches in mini muffin tins? Or you could make them in mini tart tins (like the 4" or so with removable bottoms) and cut them into mini-wedgies.

    I'm not sure the middle squares would be particularly attractive (not as a finger food anyway) unless you are planning to provide forks.

    I would press the dough into sprayed mini-muffin tins and then use a round tablespoon measure (that looks like half a sphere) to finish pressing the dough into the tin. Works great for custard tarts. For larger muffin tins I use ss shot or condiment "glasses" to press the dough.

    April