Questions on technique and food waste

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by onepiece, May 2, 2012.

  1. onepiece

    onepiece

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    I have some questions on the "proper" techniques for cutting food items.  

    The main food item I cut is onions and potatoes, but I pretty much never use "proper" techniques for cutting the potatoes.  

    I am assuming this is the standard for proper cuts: !

    Now that seems to produce a lot of wasted product.  Now sure you can use those potatoes for other things

    (Stocks and mashed potatoes), but if you aren't cooking something else in the near future that utilizes that ingredient; it seems to produce a lot of waste.  

    Am I missing something here?
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    A lot of those "pro" sorts of things don't apply as well to the home cook. At particularly high level eateries, all the vegetables have to be perfectly uniform and it may be expected by their clients.

    And the scrap is used somewhere else in the restaurant as waste control is critical to their profit.

    So you're not really missing anything. But its something to keep in mind if you want to throw a special event. Uniformly cut veg presents well.
     
  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    You can probably plan ahead for the potatoes.  Same with carrots.  Unless you're making a garnish for soups or serving sauteed julienne carrots there's really not much else you can do with perfectly cut carrots.  They look nice though.  :)
     
  4. onepiece

    onepiece

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    I see.   

    This is probably a little off topic, but is there a cutting board in existence that has a graph and measurements of how large the cuts should be?
     
  5. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    OnePiece,

    After looking at some of the food you have posted here on Cheftalk, I firmly believe that you have the skill and the talent to perfect those cuts that were in the video. It is just a matter of practice, thats all.

    If I may be frank, why spend money on a board with graphs when all you need is a bag of potatoes and a measuring tape. After awhile it will be second nature.

    Petals.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2012
  6. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I've seen these plastic models with the "proper" sizes.   They're cute like the plastic Japanese restaurant sushi kinda way.
     
  7. onepiece

    onepiece

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    Thanks for the responses.  

    I did end up finding a cutting board along the lines of what I was expecting, but the price compared to what reviews were saying  made it a no go. XD 

    http://www.thinkgeek.com/images/products/frontsquare/e7a8_ocd_chef_cutting_board.jpg

    I guess I will end up taking a ruler to some potatoes and cut them the "proper way" with the plan of using the scraps for things like Mashed Potatoes the next day.  

    Also, thanks for the kind words, Petals.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
  8. zoebisch

    zoebisch

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    That's why chickens and compost win. :D

    One other idea, although for the time investment it's hardly beneficial seeing it is so cheap...but for the conscience and to be able to do it you can grind the potatoes into a water bath, strain out the pieces and let the starch settle.  When it compacts, pour off the water and then add a little fresh water and one more strain into a clean cup.  Again when it compacts, pour off the rest of the water and then let it dry thoroughly.  Your own potato starch for thickening...nice with potpie...