Questions about fabricating Chicken

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chef douglas, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. chef douglas

    chef douglas

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    I am from a very Rural area of Ohio and, I swear, chicken is all that people eat around here; onto my questions though. I am very capable of spliting a whole chicken into quarters, bone-in obviously but I am curious as to what a French breast and supreme is (apparently fabricated from chicken), I have looked in both my Pro. Chef and Complete Techniques book and can not find entries for either of those in the index. Can anyone explain or point me in the direction of a resource somewhere on the Net? Any help would be greately appreciated.
     
  2. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Which edition of Pro. Chef do you have? I found it on page 243 of the sixth (still called New Pro. Chef) and 378 to 379 of the the seventh (back to Pro. Chef again). Although what they show as suprême is pretty much what I remember as a French breast. (I could be wrong, though; it's 10 years since I learned it, and I haven't had to do it in almost that long.) In any case, it's a skin-on boneless breast with the bone of the first wing joint still attached (that part of the wing is Frenched).

    I couldn't find it in Pepin either.
     
  3. riverrun

    riverrun

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    Hard to believe that if you don't do it on your certification exam at the culinary you fail. But then you'll never do it again unless you work in high end french places.
     
  4. dano1

    dano1

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    all the same thing-also known as airline breasts. I tend to do it frequently, if not buying prepped airlines to start.
     
  5. chef douglas

    chef douglas

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    So the general consensus is that a suprême is a French breast, interesting. Thanks for pointing that out Suzanne, I am not sure how I overlooked it in my Pro Chef book, but it is in there as you pointed out, thanks!
     
  6. chef douglas

    chef douglas

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    This is driving me nuts, I have been reading and searching just to prove that a french and supreme are the same thing i came across only one site that mentioned "French Breast" and it was the ACF site for one of their certifications and it stated that the applicant must fabricate a whole chicken into:
    2 Drums
    2 Thighs
    1 Wing
    1 French Breast
    1 Supreme

    So a supreme and french breast cant be the same thing as one would need to fabricate the entire wing from the one breast...

    ????
     
  7. dano1

    dano1

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    IIRC, the chix tender is may also be referred to as a supreme....not my first thought though, but that would jive :). Gonna hafta pull out Escoffier.
     
  8. chef douglas

    chef douglas

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    Well I went to our local Borders today (I dont own any of Escoffier books) and the only Escoffier book they had was the "Escoffier Cookbook and Guide to the Fine Art of Cookery for Connoisseurs, Chefs, Epicures" and I looked through it but to no avail... am I at a dead end on this?
     
  9. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    I found this note in Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume 1, page 267:
    I wonder if this is one of those designations that aren't completely uniform. :confused:
     
  10. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Supreme is a method of preparation and it also refers to a cut. Normally it just means the best cut from a piece of meat so you can refer to a fish filet as a supreme or a beef supreme. Supreme is also a sauce of veloute and cream.

    French breast is an airline breast with the bone cleaned like a frenched lamb rack.

    A lamb chop is also called a cotellete so I guess it can be applied to chicken based on its look when it's Frenched.

    We tend to screw things up here in America. I was at Olive Garden the other day. Can someone tell me what Chicken Scampi means? It's on their menu.