Question on Leg of Lamb in Slow Cooker - to Tie or not to Tie

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by azfoodie, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. azfoodie

    azfoodie

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    I plan to cook a whole leg of lamb in a slow cooker. So obviously a small leg, and a large slow cooker. I plan to tie the leg with butcher's twine, rub with oil, salt, pepper, and brown in the oven at 500 degrees F. Then transfer to slow cooker and cook on low for 8 hours - or more.
    1. Will the string burn when I brown in the oven?
    2. Will the tying adversely affect the tenderness of the braised meat?
    I would like to tie the leg so that its a bit easier to handle without completely falling apart when coming out of the slow cooker.

    Any advice/suggestions are appreciated. Thank you in advance.
     
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    It won't burn in the oven. I only tie my roasts when I do high heat cooking. The purpose of tying is to contort it into a more symmetrical shape so that it cooks evenly and that's important at a high heat because little bits sticking out tend to burn. But for a braise I don't see the value. Anything I braise does fall apart but I do not ever serve it in one whole piece, I just spoon it out in chunks. And if it's a small leg of lamb you could just use a large spatula to lift it out.

    So although technically there is nothing wrong with using twine I just don't see the point of allowing it to soak up perfectly good braising liquid lol.
     
  3. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I don't understand why you would cook your lamb for eight hours unless you want to pull it.
    You can't beat a perfectly roasted leg cooked to medium.
     
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  4. chefross

    chefross

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    Or medium rare......I agree...such a beautiful cut of meat cooked to death...
     
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  5. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Y'all relax, it's good. Europeans have been braising leg of lamb for ages and you're missing out. One of Greece's most famous dishes "Lamb Kleftiko" is made by braising. Try it before you knock it.
     
  6. azfoodie

    azfoodie

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    Thank you all for your input. I will truss it up and give it a shot this time. I prefer leg, shoulder, and shanks of lamb slow cooked till falling off the bone. Here is a pic of some shanks I did a few weeks ago. 18839237_10213401255251043_70830685642151453_n.jpg
     
  7. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Have to admit that shank looks pretty tasty.

    mimi
     
  8. azfoodie

    azfoodie

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    Thank you for your reply and advice. A little confused by the last sentence in your post - will tying the leg prevent or hinder the meat from soaking up the braising liquid? Thx.


     
  9. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    No, I just don't like the thought of twine soaking up the braising liquid. I don't like to share, especially with twine lol. But seriously, I just don't see the point of tying it up.
     
  10. azfoodie

    azfoodie

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    Ultimately, did tie. But did not do a classic braise in slow cooker. Instead, marinated for 24 hours, wrapped tightly in foil on a bed of onions and peppers, and roasted for 5 hours at 350, then browned at 475 for about 15 minutes.

    Leg of Lamb.jpg
     
  11. someday

    someday

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    Tying ensure evenness of cooking and might help hold shape a bit when cooking, but most likely not needed for a long cook like that. Evenness isn't much of a consideration in a 5 hour roast.

    Just an aside, meat won't "re-absorb" juices if it sits in liquid. That's nonsense. It's best to rest your meat in the liquid it is cooked in after braising, but this is more about limiting continued moisture loss from the meat than absorbing anything.
     
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  12. azfoodie

    azfoodie

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    Final product. Leg of Lamb2.jpg
     
  13. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Looks great! Definitely no need to tie it up but hey, whatever makes you happy!