Question for donut bakers!

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by Dthedude, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. Dthedude

    Dthedude

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    good morning everyone just thought I’d reach out to members on this forum because I’m kind of in a bind. Long story short is when I left the Marine Corps my parents asked me to be the yeast donut maker for their donut shop since I had a little experience working in a small shop prior to the military. Anyways I underestimated just how hard mixing and rolling yeast donuts is. After frying the donuts sometimes come out too hard and have absorbed a lot of oil and other times they are great! I don’t have my mix consistency down and I have no clue how to correct it. I’m using a high tolerant donut mix by Dawn called Raised A. I believe my biggest problem is not knowing how the texture and feel of the dough should be once it’s done mixing. If anyone could help me I would truly appreciate it.
     
  2. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    I've never used premixes for doughnut, so I cannot tell you what that's supposed to feel like exactly.

    But for normal doughnut, the dough should feel quite soft; softer than sandwich bread dough, but not as soft as pizza dough...if you know what those dough feels like.
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I would investigate your consistency on temp control, of both the dough and your cooking oil.
     
  4. Dthedude

    Dthedude

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    Thank you both for the response! So here are the usual temp readings

    Dough after finished mixing
    80-85 F
    Proof box temp
    108-113 F

    Oil temp
    360-370 F
     
  5. JamieJ

    JamieJ

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    Hi, what quantities of dough are we talking about here? If it's less than say 5kg look up stretch n fold technique. If it's more think about getting a 20qt mixer.
    Also make sure you're weighing everything in g not using cups or anything variable like that. I use a bit of fat in my do it's (butter or shortening) like a brioche dough.
     
  6. sgmchef

    sgmchef

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    Hi D,

    A possible reason for the oily ones is not allowing for adequate recovery time on the fryer temp. between batches.
    Experience is about the only way I know of to get "the feel" of correct dough consistency...

    I don't get the impression that the shop just open in the last few weeks, or is this indeed a new operation?
    I know that you understand training to meet standards. You wouldn't expect an untrained squad member to adequately execute a function, until they were properly trained.
    Have your folks demonstrate their process to achieve their standards. "This is the standard and this is how to achieve it."
    You shouldn't need to reinvent the wheel on this one.

    Did you omit information like "My parents only own the shop and never knew how to doughnuts and the yeast doughnut guy walked out". Even after rereading your post several times, I feel there is a big piece of this puzzle missing.

    I'm sure you will totally get the hang of it eventually, repetition makes for consistency of product.
    Interesting choice to cut you loose before you got the hang of it though...
     
  7. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Have you asked your supplier of mix if they can provide consulting services?
     
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  8. Dthedude

    Dthedude

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    Hmm I’ll look into that thank you.

    So long story short is we opened up in January and this is a small local franchise so each shop is individually owned. I trained at one of the shops but he only trained me in the basics he told me to make it his way and that was it. He didn’t tell me about how temperatures and water levels affect everything and how to adjust to it.
     
  9. Dthedude

    Dthedude

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    Yes sir I have reached out yesterday and they’re going to get me in contact with their guys
     
  10. Dthedude

    Dthedude

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    We have an 80 qt mixer and I’m doing about 30lbs of the mix each batch. The premixed mixes only call for water and yeast
     
  11. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Also, check your thermostats and thermometers for accuracy. The last process problem I experienced was mostly related to calibration issues.
     
  12. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Wait a second... I just read your further explanation... are you saying that the franchise owner isn’t willing to provide adequate training or consultation to ensure a consistently good product???? Yikes!!!!!!
     
  13. Dthedude

    Dthedude

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    Yeah haha it’s a weird situation, we all use the same name and recipes but all individually owned so they’ll do anything to make sure they get more sales. It’s dumb I know haha
     
  14. JamieJ

    JamieJ

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    It's rare for the pour n mix doughs to give you any grief so I'll second the advice to check your thermometer calibrations. Also don't mix your oils and change them regularly.
    See if you can speak to any of the other franchisees to see if they've run into the same problem. A problem shared is a problem halved etc