Query for Cape Chef

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by nancya, Mar 18, 2002.

  1. nancya

    nancya

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    Cape Chef,

    I've been reading yours and Abby's posts on wine lately and I find that I really want to learn more. This is not an area that it will be easy to find really sophisticated wines and I don't think I've ever heard of one of our liquor stores holding a wine tasting.

    So can you advise me on how to start? I used to drink some wines but I hardly even remember what I like. So, now I tend to buy the wine with the pretty label but I have not found that to be a really good method of choosing. Buying the wine in the pretty bottle at least leaves me with a pretty bottle.

    I know, I know...but think Simple. Is there something I should read or.....???

    Oh, help!

    Nancy
     
  2. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    Cape Chef, sorry for replying before you BUT
    I want to bring back this wonderful post of yours that I find very helpfull for those that they want to begin with wines

    The fab Four
     
  3. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Nancy,

    I would be very happy to try and help you out.

    What I am thinking is, instead of giving you names of particular winerys (I don't know what is availible to you) I thought to give you some wine styles to think about.

    I will include some of the grapes used and some of the wines that fall into their catagories.

    First things first,
    Sparklers and Champagnes
    Grapes used.
    Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Meuniar, Chenin Blanc.

    Nancy, for this..it's oysters all the way, plump, briny-sweet and half shelled.

    Light, Acidic whites
    Grapes used.
    Albarino, Chenin, Silvaner,
    Typical wines,
    Sancerres, Mosels, Vinho Verde.

    I nice light bodied poached fish goes great with Rieslings.


    Full bodied, oaked whites,
    Grapes used,
    Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Pinot Blanc.
    Typical wines,
    Gazillions ;) but give me Corton Charlemagne, Pulignys and Meursault,

    Nancy, poultry, Pork and Veal wit a cream sauce (maybe some toasted nut also) work wonders.

    Full bodied, Aromatic whites

    Grapes used,
    Gewurztraminer, Muscat and Viognier,
    Typical wines,
    Gewurztraminer, Muscat and Condrieu

    Tomme, all the way :)

    Young, Light fruity reds,

    Grapes used
    Dolcetto and Gamay,
    Typical wines,
    Beaujolais, Dolcetta, Bardolino, Valpolicella,

    A nice stew Nancy works well with the young happy acids :)


    Spicy, silky reds,

    Grapes used,
    Pinot Noir, Pinotage, Sangiovese, Grenache,
    Typical wines,
    Chianti Classico's, Brunella di Montalcino, Bourgogne rouge,

    Try Braised meats and steaks.

    Luxurious velvety reds (one of my favorites)
    Grapes used,
    Merlot and res Zins,
    Typical wines
    Pomerols, (big bucks) Saint Emilions, California Zins.


    Big, Tannic reds, (another favorite)
    Grapes used,
    Cabernet Saunignon, Syrah, Tempranilla, Nebbiolo,
    Typical wines
    Bordeaux :)lips: ) Northern Rhones (Cote Rotie and Hermitage) Riojas, Borolas, Barbarescos and Aussie Shiraz.

    Nancy, Maybe print this out...bring it to your wine shop.

    I hope this you some ideas, if you need more help, don't hesitate.
    cc
     
  4. kimmie

    kimmie

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    Hi Nancy,

    A great place to start would probably be with The Perfect Match : Pairing Delicious Recipes With Great Wine by Brian St. Pierre - Publisher: Chronicle Books
    Editor: Willliam LeBlond
    Price: $27.50

    This book is both a guide to the principles of pairing wine with food and a glorious collection of mouthwatering recipes.

    Amazon's review:
    "Author Brian St. Pierre takes the intimidation out and puts the accessibility in, and lists grapes by varietal with descriptions of their principal flavors, virtues as a companion with meals, and the foods they go best with. This artfully photographed volume offers over 70 delicious recipes, many based on the classics of the great wine-producing regions of Europe, as well as contemporary cuisine from the New World. Additional topics include flavors that are difficult to match, how special occasions influence wine choices, and the big cheese question: red, white, dry, or sweet? With two handy indexes, one by wine and one by major ingredient, finding the perfect match has never been easier."

    The book is among the nominees for the 2002 James Beard Foundation Awards in the ENTERTAINING AND SPECIAL OCCASIONS category.

    The price is reasonable and it's a nice, friendly place to get started.


    :)
     
  5. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Nancy,

    I totaly agree with Kimmie, Excellent book, you should look for it.
    cc
     
  6. kimmie

    kimmie

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    You can get it via "The Good Cook" at even lower cost! :rolleyes:
     
  7. nancya

    nancya

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    Sorry for being so slow to get back to you...I've been incredibly busy.

    Thank you Brad and Kimmie.

    I appreciate the list Brad...but this is where I'm stuck. I mean, I know I like a nice Chardonnay or a Cabernet Sauvignon, but I don't know how to choose between the ones available. As I said, choosing the pretty label is not a good idea and although some are identified with these weird little rating labels - I have no idea what they mean.

    Will Kimmie's book help with that? There is so much to learn!

    Kimmie, the book is not in this month's catalog - and this month is a super bargain month. Dagnabit!

    How about German whites? I have a friend who thinks that they are just tops but I find them rather sweet and fruity. Any suggestions for a compromise or do I have to keep drinking the Rhine wines?

    Nancy
     
  8. kimmie

    kimmie

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    I think it does have notes on how to read labels.

    If you have a book store near you, try to find it. It's well worth it at full price too!

    P.S.: About German wines, it's ALWAYS a matter of taste. I much prefer a Riesling from Alsace, for instance. The author talks a bit about German wines in his book.
     
  9. isa

    isa

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    Call the book club Nancy. if you ask, they will let you buy books that are not in this month catalogue at the sale price.
     
  10. shimmer

    shimmer

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    Barnes and Noble.com has free online courses, and I once took the Intro to Wine (www.bnuniversity.com) course. I didn't actually purchase the books they suggested, although they were great references. They also give you weekly exercises, one I remember was buying grapes and eating them different ways, and then pairing a wine with different very specific foods.

    That's another free place to look!

    ~~Shimmer~~
     
  11. kimmie

    kimmie

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    What a wonderful concept. You should look into it Nancya. ;)
     
  12. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Hi Nancy,

    Let me get back to you with some tangible names and producers to seek out.

    Get a feel for there style and how it fits in with your taste.

    As I look back at my reply to you I can see that it may be a little over the top for someone who is trying to get started.
    cc
     
  13. nancya

    nancya

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    Thanks so much, Brad! I really appreciate your help.

    Also, Shimmer...that does sound like an interesting idea. I will look into it. Thanks.

    Nancy
     
  14. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Hi Nancy,

    Sorry to be so tardy with some wines for you, but I had to see how many of the bottles I would recommend have pretty labels, some do and some don’t, LOL….

    Anyway,
    These are a number of wines that I have tasted in the last six months that I kept notes on, I also called a good friend of mine to find out about the natinal distrobution of these wines, most are availible nation wide.

    Nancy, I tried really hard to give you wines for $ 20 and under to start, I thought this may help you develop your own personal berometer on taste and preferences.

    Italy,
    Raptala, Sicillia casalj Rabitallavi (white)
    Inama, Soave classico superioer vigneti di Foscarnino (white)
    Maculan, Merlot-Cabernet blend, Veneto Brentino
    Masi, Verona Campofiorin

    Spain
    Vina Solarca, Ridera de Duera Crianza (red)
    Vina Villabuena, Tempranillo Rioja (red)

    California
    Carmenet, North coast dynomite cabernet
    Hess select, cabernet
    Estancia, cabernet
    RH Phillips, Cabernet/Syrah blend..Toasted head (very funky bottle)
    Groth Sauvignon Blanc Napa (white)
    Duckhorn “ “
    Chateau Souverain, Syrah Alexander Valley (Nancy, Souverain is very hot)
    Steele, Syrah, clear lake
    Belvedere Dry Creek Zin
    Cline, (anything)
    Rancho Zabaco, Dry Creek Zin
    Ravenswood, mendocino Zin

    Aussies
    M Brown, Shiraz Barossa
    Hardy’s, Cabernet
    Hearthfield Ridge, Shiraz Limestone
    Tatachilla, Grenach/Shiraz

    France
    Henri Bourgeois, Pouilly Fume (white)
    Vincent Pinard, Sancerre Cuvee Flores (white)
    Domaine Sautereau, Cotes de Reigny
    Domaine Bourillon, Dorleans, Vouvray sec
    Domaine Santa Duc, Cotes du Rhone
    E. Guigal, Tavel (dry rose)

    Nancy, almost all these wines have been released with in the last 8/10 months.
    I hope this helps you a bit, take a friend around your area to the stores, pick out some wines, buy some cheeses and crusty bread and start a little wine tasting.
    cc
     
  15. nancya

    nancya

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    Thanks a lot CC!

    I will copy this and pop down to my local liquor store...or possibly one in Rapid City - and see what they have! I did find that book recommended in the Good Cook catalog after all so I'm ordering it as well as one on pairing wine with cheese. Of course, finding cheese here is an adventure in and of itself!

    Thanks to all

    Nancy
     
  16. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Dear Nancy,

    I wanted to give you a couple more wines to look for in your travels, BTW..have you had a chance to try some of the other ones?

    These are some nice california whites to try.

    Sanford, Chardonnay Santa barbra
    Murphy goode Chardonnay Sonoma
    Kunde, Chardonnay, sonoma ,Kinneybrook Vineyard
    Pine Ridge, Chardonnay, Napa Valley Carneros dijon clone :)
    Chateau Souverain Chardonnay, Sonoma
    Frog's leap, Chardonnay Napa valley
    Davis Byrum, Chardonnay Russian river valley
    Sterling Chardonnay, North coast.

    Have fun, keep me posted how things go
    cc
     
  17. david jones

    david jones

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    How about another approach? Pick a winemaker or an importer, and taste everything you can in their portfolio. Just like restaurants can be "chef-driven" to varying degrees, wineries are winemaker driven to varying degrees.

    Check out wines made by Bob Lindquist (Qupe, Chateau Routas, etc.) or Jim Clendennon (sp?) (Au Bon Climat, Il Podere del'Olivos, Cold Heaven, Ici La Bas, etc.)

    Look for importers like Robert Kacher, Marc de Grazia, Robert Chadderdon, Neil Rosenthal, or others.

    Just like a favorite chef may have a style you appreciate, these winemakers or importers may have a style that you enjoy. Once you identify one or two whose work you enjoy, you can explore every wine they make or import.
     
  18. david jones

    david jones

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    Just remember that wine is a part of dining culture. Eat, drink and be Mary!