purple chili peppers

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by siduri, Jul 5, 2011.

  1. siduri

    siduri

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    I wanted a plant of hot peppers to use fresh (i don't much like them dried, when i only feel the hotness, but fresh they seem to have a flavor.)  I bought one with no peppers on it yet, and they said was supposed to be the long, thin red peppers. They were yellow, largish and deeply wrinkled (like giant dried prunes in shape and size) and extremely hot!  Then i went to a plant nursery.  The guy said yes, these were small and red and long and pointy.  They are red, but the same shape as the others.  Today i bought a plant from a vegetable stand and it had plenty of peppers on it, long (2 inches) thin (1/4 inch) and pointy - some were red but most were purple (just like eggplant color)

    What kind are these?  Were the red ones on the same plant just ripe purple ones, or were the red ones unripened purple ones? 

    They had a nice flavor and were moderately hot, just right.  I had never seen this color.  Is it a new hybrid? 
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2011
  2. french fries

    french fries

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    Could be a variety that is less known. I know a local farmer who grows purple bell peppers, it's just a different variety, tastes the same as a green bell  pepper. IMO it looks less appetizing than a green one, but its color gives it that "rare" factor that probably appeals to some.
     
  3. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Chilis come in at least 8 different colors, Siduri, plus multi-colored ones as well. Some are hyrids, to be sure. But many of them are open-pollinated heirloom varieties as well.

    In many cases they actually go through several color changes. For instance, I have one pepper that starts green, turns first to flame, then to scarlet. More typically they go through one change, from green to whatever their final color.

    Purple is usually the end color of those that go through multi-stages. So I'd guess that the red ones on your plant will eventually turn.

    Something interesting too, is that there is a different flavor/heat profile with each color stage. Thus, when green they will have the least amount of both flavor (because the sugars haven't developed fully) and heat (ditto capcaisin). As the move towards full ripeness both the flavor and heat intensify.
     
  4. french fries

    french fries

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    KYH, do bell peppers have ANY capsaicin at all? I thought they did not. 
     
  5. siduri

    siduri

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    Occasionally bell peppers are as hot as chilis!  Once i was making a dinner for friends and it involved slicing onions and slicing peppers.  I was tearing from the onions, and wiping my eyes with the back of my hand, and then kept weeping with the peppers.  So i said, ok, i'll rinse my -hands and then wash off my face to get all the onion off it.  It turned out that the pepper was a hot one, and i burned my face, got all red and swollen.  Onion juice rinses off with just water, but i suspect the hot stuff of the peppers is oil based (is it?) - in any case it only spread it, like water on an oil fire!  So my guess is, yes.  Most don't have much but occasionally you can get a hot one - at least here. 

    My mother in law always tasted a small corner ofr each just to be sure. 

    KY, thanks.  I was mainly curious about the final color and if the purple had any different flavor qualities from the red.  i usually figure red is sweet (sugar maple leaves turn red in fall, some fruits are sweeter when deep red).  But purple? 
     
  6. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    FrenchFries, chemically speaking the is an infinatessimal amount of capcaisin in bells. Not enough that you'd actually notice, and, officially, their SHU rating is 0.

    However, as with all peppers, sometimes growing conditions (particularly if they've been stressed) cause capcaisin levels to intensify and become apparent. That's why gardeners who grow both sweet and hot banana peppers sometimes think a cross will show up in that year's crop. They bite into a sweet one and it turns out to be hot.

    I suspect that was Siduri's problem in the above example.

    Sometimes, too, there are crosses or mutations from the previous year which show up in the seeds. This is an especial problem with home-saved pepper seeds. It's been reliably estimated that as much as 80% of home-grown peppers have crossed.

     i usually figure red is sweet

    Generally true, Siduri. With all vegetables, the sugar levels (technically expressed as a brix number) increase as the fruit ripens. And, because most of us only see green, red, or yellow bells, and many think they are different varieties, we think of red (and yellow) bells as being sweeter than green ones.

    I'm always astounded by the number of people who do not realize that green bell peppers are unripe. One of several vegetables we're accustomed to eating at that stage.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2011
  7. siduri

    siduri

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    I just saw a billboard for what is supposedly the first International Hot Pepper Fair in Rieti   in July featuring 400 - count 'em, FOUR HUNDRED varieties of hot pepper,  Here is a (bad) translation for their site.  Rieti is in northern Lazio (Latium) not far from Rome. 

    http://www.rieticuorepiccante.it/eng/about-us.html
     
  8. teamfat

    teamfat

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    [quote name="siduri" url="/forum/thread/66471/purple-chili-peppers#post_356029"]




    i suspect the hot stuff of the peppers is oil based (is it?)  
    [/quote]

    Yes. Drinking water to cool the heat just helps to spread it around, making it worse. Capsaicin is a waxy sort of oil based compound, not water soluble. It does, however, have an affinity for fats. So eating a blob of butter will cool one's palate more than water. Or whole milk, for those that don't want to gnaw off the end of a butter stick.

    mjb.
     
  9. siduri

    siduri

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    Now that's useful information!  I knew acid was an antidote, but not fats.  Sour cream would be perfect then /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif   I rarely find food that's that hot here but I learned by experience that water doesn;t work, heard acids work (lemon juice, orange juice) but never thought of fats. I usually use bread, which is always handy. 
     
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2011