Pureed roasted garlic

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by shortamazon, Jun 17, 2004.

  1. shortamazon

    shortamazon

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    How long can pureed roasted garlic last in the freg? I have tons of it. Can it
    frozen? Thanks for helping me out. :)


    shortamazon
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    A week, give or take. Plenty of variables.

    Freeze it. Not just in the freezer section of a refrigerator, but a true deep freeze. Should hold 6 months there.

    Phil
     
  3. suzanne

    suzanne

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    I beg to differ. I made my current batch (about a pint) on 2/29/04, and it's still fine in the fridge. Almost used up, but fine. FWIW, I keep my fridge in the high 30s (F).

    As with all condiments, keeping contaminants out is important for longer shelflife. Always use a clean spoon, don't let anything fall into it -- all the usual caveats.

    If you do freeze it (nothing wrong with doing that), try putting it into small quantities -- the ice-cube tray trick, or a tablespoon or two in a snack bag.
     
  4. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm basing my opinion on Helen Witty's writings, largely because of the food poisoning risk. I don't know the exact percentages and they may be very low but I feel it's better to play it safe.

    Suzanne's recommendation to freeze in small chunks is a good one.

    Phil
     
  5. suzanne

    suzanne

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    If you're thinking of botulism -- Clostridium botulinum is anaerobic, but the garlic is both cooked AND exposed to air in storage, so it's less likely.

    I don't mean to minimize the very real possibility of food-borne illness; it's just that my experience with roast garlic puree (both at home and at work where we would make 10 to 15 pounds at a time and hold it for several weeks) is one of safe, relatively longterm storage.
     
  6. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Certainly botulism is of vanishingly low risk unless oil is added to the storage, a frequent choice. Cooking only kills active botulinin and safely denatures the toxin if of the proper temperature and duration; the spores are still present and viable.

    To me, it's more a matter of what is a generally good safe practice.

    Phil
     
  7. shortamazon

    shortamazon

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    Love all the info. :) Right now I have bout..14-18 gallons of this stuff. I am
    going to cube freez them etc and some will go in freg.

    thanks for the great info! :)

    shortamazon
     
  8. anneke

    anneke

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    The last case of botulism around here was from a cooked potato. Heat kills bacteria, but does not necessarily deactivate toxins. I think it's an important distinction.