Pumpkin soup - sweet or savory?

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by marmalady, Sep 25, 2002.

  1. marmalady

    marmalady

    Messages:
    1,046
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    So I have this beautiful cheese pumpkin sitting on the counter, and have to decide whether to do a soup based on 'sweeter' spices (cinnamon, ginger, etc.), or one with more savory herbs like sage and thyme.

    What are your favorites? Do you roast your pumpkins/squashes first? What wines/liquors do you use?

    Inquiring minds want to know!
     
  2. cape chef

    cape chef

    Messages:
    4,508
    Likes Received:
    32
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    For me it depends on what (if anything) i'm serving with it.

    If I want to highlight the earthyness of autumn shrooms for example i'll go savoury,but if I have some sweet lobster to showcase i'll lean towards the sweet spices.

    If you want to roast your pumpkin you can really go both ways,because you will be consentrating the natural sugars.

    Without posting a whole recipe I always use rutabaga,turnips,carrots a bit of hubbard squash,onions,leeks and a bouget garni in addition to the pumpkin to add balance.

    On it's own.I love to serve it in petit hollowed out pumpkin shells with a dollop of creme fraich and garnished with fried sage leaves.

    Cheastnuts also go nicely as a garnish
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,462
    Likes Received:
    455
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    I'd go savory, but I prefer savory over sweet. Try it with chipotles. The smoky heat works well with squash. The Bufalo brand chipotle hot sauce is a good way to work those flavors into the soup.

    While not a soup, I've had it used in place of tomatoes in a pasta sauce with sausage and sage. Something there could work interesting results.

    If I were going sweet, I think dark chocolate would have to make an appearance with the pumpkin. How much is the question....

    Phil
     
  4. anneke

    anneke

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    I love the pumpkin/nutmeg/procuitto combo, in any incarnation. Soup, ragout, salad,risotto, etc.
     
  5. suzanne

    suzanne

    Messages:
    3,853
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Food Editor
    As Cape says, roasting will concentrate the flavor. So roast away! And as much as I tend to prefer savory, what an opportunity to combine. Something Middle-Eastern or Moroccan, with cinnamon, cumin, red pepper, ... mmmmmmmmm:)
     
  6. marmalady

    marmalady

    Messages:
    1,046
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    Everything sounds great - I may have to pick up another pumpkin - or two - or three - or more!!!

    I love the idea of the chipotle, phatch and I might just sneak some chocolate in there anyway! one of my fave chili recipes has chocolate in it and it adds a whole other layer. Oh, yum!

    PS - Y'all have to excuse me for being a little brain dead lately; getting organized for the move, dealing with SSI/Medicare/Medicaid transfers for my son, etc., etc., has left me with more than my share of 'senior moments'!!!
     
  7. merwin

    merwin

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    10
    Try it as a sweet soup. I fry all the insides with garlic, onions and butter, then add water to steam the pumpkin. Try a little saffron in the final mix or a little cream and maple syrup. mmmmmmmmmmmmm gota try this. merwin
     
  8. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,301
    Likes Received:
    879
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I am with phatch on this one, I like to give pumpkin and squash soups a little kick, either with chipotle or any other various dried chiles. To this I also add some cinnamon and just a hint of cumin, both of them toasted. The mix gives the soup an exotic flair. Of course, a nice roasted pumpkin soup sweetened with maple syrup isn't too bad either......:D


    One of my favorite ways to garnish squash soups is with candied ancho peppers. I julienne the dried peppers, then simmer them in a heavy simple syrup until tender. I strain them, and lay them out to dry. When almost dry, but still a little tacky I toss them in granulated sugar. Not only do they make a great garnish, but also a great little snack (if you can stand the heat;) )
     
  9. marmalady

    marmalady

    Messages:
    1,046
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: CANDIED ANCHOS!!!!! OMG!!!! Love it!
     
  10. pongi

    pongi

    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    10
    I love pumpkin soup with king prawns!

    A chopped shallot, gently fried in EVOO (a dash of curry powder is optional), then add 2 parts pumpkin and 1 part potatoes, both diced, fry again, then cover with water or vegetable stock and cook until tender. Process to a cream, season with S&P and some sugar, reheat and pour in individual bowls. Scatter on the surface 4-6 king prawns, shelled and sauteed in EVOO. Finish with EVOO and a dash of chopped parsley. Yum!

    An Italian secret?

    Powdered dry Amaretti cookies! Their taste goes wonderfully with pumpkin, in any type of dish but most of all in my very favourite pumpkin dish: Pumpkin Ravioli, a true delice of Northern Italian cooking.
    The filling is made with baked and smashed pumpkin, grated Parmesan, powdered Amaretti, some beaten egg, a small dash of grated nutmeg, S&P. Someone add some minced Mostarda di Cremona (do you know it?) but, although my father's family comes just from Cremona ;) I don't agree as it overwhelms the pumpkin. Homemade pasta dough as usual. These Ravioli MUST be served only with grated Parmesan and plenty of melted butter...NO killer sauces!

    In Lombardia and Emilia Romagna they're a typical Christmas Eve dish.

    Pongi
     
  11. marmalady

    marmalady

    Messages:
    1,046
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    The amaretti sound amazing, Pongi! I'm not familiar with the Mostardi de Cremoni - what is it? And I adore pumpkin ravioli!

    Somewhere I have a recipe for a Chinese shu-mai, a dim sum, made with a pumpkin/ginger/soy filling that's really very delicate and yummy! If you'd like, I can dig it up and send it on to you.
     
  12. pongi

    pongi

    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    10
    Oh, dig it up, Marmalady, please! :)

    Mostarda di Cremona is made of whole mixed fruits (pears, peaches, apricots, cherries, figs, tangerines and plums are the usual) in syrup, flavoured with mustard extract. Is a delicious sweet-piquant relish, to be served with boiled and roasted meat, or cheese, but a small amount can be added to some fillings as well. It must be easily available also in US as you can buy EVERYTHING there...

    Pongi
     
  13. marmalady

    marmalady

    Messages:
    1,046
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    Wow, The mostardi sounds amazing - I've never seen it, but I'll be sure to watch out for it in my culinary travels!

    Recipe:

    PUMPKIN/SQUASH/SWEET POTATO SHUI MAI

    2 cups peeled diced pumpkin/squash/sweet potato
    1/3 cup roasted chopped cashews (unsalted)
    3 scallions, minced
    2T minced ginger
    2T minced cilantro (Pongi, if you can't find this, forget it!)
    1T vegetable oil
    1T soy sauce
    1/4 tsp. cayenne (optional)
    1 egg, beaten
    30 wonton wrappers

    Cover pumpkin/squash/sweet potato with water in a pot; bring to a boil, reduce heat and cover and cook til very soft. Drain and mash with a fork til almost smooth.

    Add other ingredients and let the mixture cool.

    Trim the edges off the wonton wrappers to round them off, or if you can find them, get the ones that are round.

    Place about 2 tsp. of the filling in the center of each wrapper. Place the filled wrapper in the palm of your hand, and use the fingers of your other hand to 'push' the edges up and around the filling. What you should have is a little 'cup' with the filling in the middle. Place the dumplings on a tray with cornstarch sprinkled on it. Chill at least 15 minutes before cooking.

    Heat a nonstick pan with a little veg. oil. Place dumplings in a single layer in the pan and cook til the bottoms are just starting to brown a little. Add about 1/4 cup water to the pan and cover. Steam for about 5 minutes.
     
  14. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

    Messages:
    9,204
    Likes Received:
    65
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Pongi, the recipe for Mostarda di Cremona is easy to come by, but I haven't found the prepared product except in one very good Italian grocery where I used to live. I found the recipe at recipesource.com I believe.
     
  15. panini

    panini

    Messages:
    5,167
    Likes Received:
    283
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    I'm with the chili people. If your going to sneak a little choco. in there I would pair it with ancho. corse down here once those turkeys are pulled from the smoker we put in our pumpkin or squash.
    Can't wait to have y'all down. We close on a new home 10-15.
    Designing a new smoker now. Great house, kitchen sucks. Just got back from spending a small fortune on new appliances. Has anyone priced this stuff lately!!!?
    Marm! forget the cilantro:eek:

    I want to try your formula, how does one print something from a post, cut and paste? I know, I'm so dumb with this machine.
     
  16. pongi

    pongi

    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    10
    Thanks Marm for the recipe!
    Sounds yummy...unfortunately I'm forced to forget cilantro, as you know :( but hope I'll manage to find wonton wrappers - although the odds are that they're harder to find here than Mostarda di Cremona in US:cry:
    BTW: although the recipe is pretty easy, Mostarda it's just one of those things that when made at home never end up as good as the commercial products. My advice is to look for it in a good Italian deli shop before trying to make your own, but if you can't find it I have a good recipe. :)

    Pongi