Pulled Sugar for Dummies

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by chefron, Jun 30, 1999.

  1. sugardazed

    sugardazed

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    Ok I'm very new to the sugar pulling/blowing and was starting to collect the items needed for it but I had some questions about it. When wanting to color the sugar for pulling when do you add the coloring and how? I read on then net something about adding it later in the process mixed with 95% alcohol... I wasn't really sure if this was for that particular receipe or was a standard practice. Also only thing that I see as far as starter things I can form are like roses and stuff. Anyone got a good site or know a place to get; I guess you can say Step by Step directions on how to make the other really nice items? I would very much love any help that I can get. Oh also anyone have an idea of how to make old fashion peppermint sticks? The ones that the sugar melts in your mouth. :p

    Thanks, Sugardazed.
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Be carefull with that playdough! If you read closely, most sugar pulling books say to use plasticine. A bit more expensive, and only obtainable in art stores. Why?
    The cheapo playdoughs, while non-toxic, can not handle heat! Believe me, I found this out the hard way. They just melt like a candle when the hot sugar hits it. Plasticine stays put.

    Also, I found it very reasonable to trot off to a metal shop, where you can buy any type of metal. I got me some 3/8"x 3/8" Stainless steel bars cut in pairs of 4, 6, and 8 inches long. These bars, combined with tin cans and platicine, allow me to pretty much cast any 2 d shape I want. The bars also come in handy for nougat casting and other things as well.
     
  3. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    I respectfully disagree foodpump Playdough will handle the heat use it all the time no problems.

    Best Regards Cakerookie...
     
  4. foodpump

    foodpump

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    O.K. Cakerookie, I'll take your word for it. To be honest, I've never used the "Playdoh" brand, but I've had disastorous results with the cheap imitation plasticines.
     
  5. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    To be honest FP all this stuff is really debatable on any platform in the industry. What works for one may not work for the other. There are so many variables in sugar work until its unreal. I guess I am sounding kind of harsh today I don't mean too. Thats the reason I have been trying for almost a year to establish a website for this very thing. Just cannot seem to get it off the ground.Everyone that has questions about sugar work should go to www.pastrychef.info there is an article there that will give the beginner some great insight into sugar work everyone needs to check it out. Its written by one of my favorite chefs Martin Chiffers and no one can argue with his credentials.

    Best Regards Cakerookie...
     
  6. sugardazed

    sugardazed

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    Can anyone tell me when I add the coloring and how? Like I asked in a previous post do I need to dilute the coloring with anything?
     
  7. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    No dilution necessary! Add your coloring at around 280 F. What type coloring are you adding? You can use powdered, gel, or regular food coloring. Once you add the color do not stir just shake the pan gently to incorporate the color.

    Best Regards Cakerookie...
     
  8. ashleys

    ashleys

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    This information has all been wonderful and helped me get the first part of a school project done. But I have one very important question left. How do I not ruin my pans? Do I just dissolve the think layer of sugar residue with hot water until it's gone?
     
  9. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Just fill the pan with water and bring it to a boil all the harden sugar will melt.
     
  10. tinawenzel

    tinawenzel

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    My Mom took the Wilton Master course for pulled sugar and while there purchased a set of equipment to include a custom made box with heat lamp, silpat mats, etc. She has never used it due to lack of time and I'm just wondering if anyone knows where I could sell it? I currently have it listed on ebay under sugar pulling equipment. Thanks.
     
  11. marzipan-doll

    marzipan-doll

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    Hi all!
    Can I jump in? I am a big fan of marzipan but I was always interested in sugar too. I don't think I have the time nowadays to take a professional class, but I'd love to try at home on my own. Just blowing some sugar balls for now. I looked pulled sugar up on Google and I found different recipes for it. I found the one that you guys posted on this thread, but also another one. I would like to know why this and why not the other. The other : 5 cups of sugar/ 1 cup and 2 tbsp of water/ 2tbsp and 1 tsp of vinegar. Temps and pulling is same as you described. So that one is not good? Educate me! Thank you in advance!:D
    -Also if I get to the point of holding a hot sugar bubble on the end of my tube... Then what? I wait until it cools of before I take it down? Can you tell I am clueless?
     
  12. kitagrl

    kitagrl

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    Hi all!  I guess this is an old thread but I was searching for information on sugar work.

    I have my own small cake decorating business and just started playing with isomalt this week and I love it and want more!

    I have two questions for now....I ordered a pair of latex sugar gloves...how much does that protect your hands from burns?

    Also....what is the difference between isomalt and real sugar, practically speaking?    Do they behave the same?  Do you pull them the same?  Is it mainly a difference in flavor?

    Thanks so much!  This board looks interesting.
     
  13. kitagrl

    kitagrl

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    Edited...oops sorry
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2010
  14. chefron

    chefron

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    Kitagrl,

    LOL! I began this thread 11 years ago! Today I have mostly mastered the craft!

    The gloves protect the sugar from your hands and NOT the other way around! Endure the pain. You will survive. I go through maybe 6 pairs of gloves per session as they keep melting on me. The thing is I am so accustomed to the heat that I cannot tell when my gloves have melted until I suddenly see fingerprints on my pieces. I'll say to myself: "Hey, where the hell did that fingerprint come from?",  and that's when I discover that I have ruined yet another pair of gloves!

    Isomalt is more resistant to humidity than regular sugar is so you can cook it to lower temperatures which means less pain for newbies. The more humid the environment you are working in the higher a temp you have to take the sugar... up to about 320-degrees. Sugar which is cooked to that high a temp is stronger and that means it is more difficult to pull. To make pulling easier, you have to work it at a hotter temperature. Isomalt is generally cooked to 300-degrees. That 20-degree difference can mean the difference between first and second-degree burns.
     
  15. lagcreations

    lagcreations

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    Chef Ron,

    Thank you so much for describing the difference between isomalt and regular sugar. I have been trying to find the answer to this question for over a week. I currently have a shop making custom wedding cakes and would like to venture into more sugar work but could not find anyone that would sum up the differences. Thank you, thank you, thank you...
     
  16. william gerber

    william gerber

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    A fellow pastry chef wants me to make pulled sugar flowers for wedding cakes. I want to know how much to charge him on a per rose basis. I don't work in his shop.  Does anyone know how much to charge?

    Thank you!

    Vass
     
  17. panini

    panini

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    It is strange to read posts I made 10 years ago.

    Chef Gerber,

    I usually like for a buddy to owe me for something.

    We retail out at 18. To accounts/other chefs 7.50. with a minimum.

    hth

    pan
     
  18. william gerber

    william gerber

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    Ha, TY! I'm curious to see if I can make a business out if it. I took a class with Stephane Glacier and I don't want to waste it.
     
  19. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Many years ago I taught in a Food School in Ny. I was always in awe of my fellow instructors that did cocoa paintings and puloled sugar. It is an art to itself .There were no molds or isomalt, just sugar, water and paste color and a slab of marble and a lamp. The turned out products were amazing Guys like Joe Tarrantinno from the Plaza. Conrad Stengle from The Old Colony, Charlie Mengel from The Stork Club, Joe Lancianni from the Plaza  These guys were not pastry chefs, they wer True Artist. All of them had hands of steel , the extreme heat did not bother them.
     
  20. markolenno

    markolenno

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    hello

    my pulled sugar gets firm and hard, but then after some short time it gets very sticky. what's wrong?

    I used this recipe:

    1/4 cup + 1/2 Tb water

    1 cup + 1/4 cup sugar

    1/4 tsp citric acid

    1/2 Tb liquid color without alcohol

    320oF