puff pastry rolling pin

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by brook, Jul 14, 2003.

  1. brook

    brook

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    Has anyone used a plastic rolling pin for making puff pastry? I saw one in a catalogue, but they are pricey. Do they really help you make better puff pastry? Are they also helpful for making croissants? Are there any other uses for them? Any input is welcome! Thanks.
     
  2. w.debord

    w.debord

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    Plastic pins are a new thing to me. I know everyone has their preference, but personally I'm not so into what my pin is made of. But I have a certain weight, length and handles I like. When I have those factors working for me I can hussle. After that, I think the room temp. and your counter surface are more important factors to making a good rolled-in dough.


    Sorry, I'd spend my money on something else.
     
  3. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Brook,

    Which catalog? Can you find a picture of it online and direct us to it? I'm sure someone didn't go thru the trouble of making it if it didn't work at all.

    I've seen a a pretty cool OXO rolling pin that was plastic and coated in teflon with ergonomic handles that always stayed in the correct position by way of gravity, also wide and heavy, but not necessarily made for a specific use.

    I second W.DeBord. Each individual user will prefer a different rolling pin. Each individual's height, weight, strength, and coordination will vary, and so will their rolling pin. What works well for some may not work well for others.
     
  4. brook

    brook

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  5. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Ah! Yes, they do work.

    Puff pastry is made every day all over the world without the Puff Pastry Rolling Pin.

    If you have enough money and would utilize the tool often enough to justify the cost, then by all means, make the investment. Otherwise, I'd have to agree again with W.DeBord that there are other things I can think of I'd need more.
     
  6. brook

    brook

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    Thanks, everyone!

    A quick question: does the puff pastry rolling pin also improve other pastry doughs that have alot of butter and require turns (like croissants, danish pastry dough, etc.)? That might make it more worth considering.
     
  7. jock

    jock

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    I saw one of these in Sur la Table the other day for $164... aaaargh, gasp!
    I asked one of the instructors about it at CCA who teaches laminated doughs. She said what a waste of money. If you learn the proper technique for layering the butter and dough, there is no need for specialty tools. As someone else pointed out, a straight rolling pin has been used successfully for a very long time.

    Jock
     
  8. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Brook,

    As Jock reiterated, proper technique with a regular rolling pin, cold and high quality scratch ingredients, and patience should be more than enough.
     
  9. brook

    brook

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    I successfully made croissants for the first time a few months ago and thought that a puff pastry rolling pin might make them even better! Thanks everyone -- you just saved me lots of money!

    Can you describe the proper technique for layering dough and butter? Or alternatively, have you book to recommend that is particularly clear and good?

    Thanks again.
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I used Escoffier's classic text, Raymond Oliver's LA CUISINE and - I think - the Time/Life book entitled COOKING OF THE VIENNESE EMPIRE for puff pastry instructions and technique. They all worked for me.
     
  11. weekend cook

    weekend cook

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    I know this is quite an expense, but if you like making puff pastry, the fluted rolling pin is indispensable.  I had the same question before I made my investment.  And in spite of my reservation, I bought one and am glad I did.  As you know, when you roll out puff pastry -- after about the 2nd turn -- the dough becomes rather hard to control.  It wants to curve sharply to the right or left, when your objective is to keep a perfect rectangle.  Well, leave it to the French to come up with such a design.

    The flutes somehow continuously nudge the dough out in a perfect line.  They also cause the butter to distribute itself evenly.  Other rolling pins make your press the layers of dough an butter together.    Uneven rolling will make the bouchee rise unevenly.  Problem solved with this rolling pin.

    Trust me, you will love it.  And if you're like me, you may reserve a Saturday morning to make 4 or 5 batches which freeze marvelously and can be easily rolled out in the summer months.  You couldn't make 5 batches with a regular rolling pin.

    I wish you well and respect anyone who makes their own puff pastry.

    Rick

    P.S.  If you are making puff pastry to encase a beef wellington, try using brioche dough instead.  The bottom won't fall out.
     
  12. victoria chinn

    victoria chinn

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    I agree with the weekend cook, I also purchased the ridged rolling pin and find it exceptionally easy to roll out my laminated dough without having to fight for control. I have used it for puff pastry dough used to make Croissants and Pan au Chocolat as well as Danish pastry dough. The pin is expensive, but I have never regretted the investment and look at this pastry now as as easy to make as any other time consuming, but worth it consumable. Don't use it to pound and form your butter square though. I use a regular old round French pin for that and put it in the freezer for about 10 mins before I start the initial incorporation process. I have found using the ridged rolling pin speeds up the rolling process so much that I never have to stop and put the dough in the fridge to chill if the butter starts getting too soft. I put a large bowl of ice directly under by quartz counter and roll it directly on top of my counter. Perfection every time.