Publishing a menu

1
10
Joined Dec 12, 2002
I once I worked at a restaurant where the chef said that he published his menu so that if he were fired, the restaurant could no longer use it.

Is this true?:confused:
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
7,107
542
Joined Jun 11, 2001
No, that's not true. It just shows bad faith on the part of the chef. I believe the chef worked for the restaurant, and any output of his would be done under the auspices of the restaurant. Fact is, he didn't pay for it, he didn't typeset it, he didn't send it to the printer, he didnt... you get the picture.

This chef has an ego problem. Menus change with the seasons and if you're confident enough in your abilities then who cares. You just keep working on stuff. There aren't any secrets. What a lamer.

Kuan
 
3,853
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Joined May 26, 2001
Well ... it could possibly be true, but only if he had a contract that specified that. And the owners couldn't be THAT stupid as to include such a clause, could they? :rolleyes:

But in real life, Kuan is right.
 
1,403
37
Joined Jan 1, 2001
That chef's a bone-head.

First of all, just because something is published doesn't mean it's copywrited.

And what does he mean by publishing, running off a few copies at Kinkos?
Wrong.

Nothing says that a restaurant owner or chef can't take a recipe that's been published in a book (copywrited) and use it to serve his/her guests. As a matter of fact, it happens all the time.

Besides, a menu is just a list of dishes offered, not the great American novel.
I've never heard of any plagiarism suit contesting a menu. The notion is so ridiculous, it'd be thrown out in a NY minute.
 
799
12
Joined Feb 21, 2001
"First of all, just because something is published doesn't mean it's copywrited."

I don't think that's true. You don't need to file for copyrights for a lot of things. You get more protection if you do, but the mere fact that you published your work is enough.

The assertion that "just because something is published doesn't mean it's copywrited" is true in a lot of cases, but subtlety is the key to victory here.
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
7,107
542
Joined Jun 11, 2001
Technically, if you're the creator of the work, then you own the copyright. You don't have to register anything. All you have to do is show that it's your work. Most of the time that means attaching your name to the work, like the use of a c in a circle, followed by the date and the name of the creator. That's all it takes.

Kuan
 
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