Proper Shortcrust for quiche?

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by dion r, May 30, 2005.

  1. dion r

    dion r

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    A fairly basic question but, I have been given some contradictory advice by two chefs I work with. One says that the proper way to make shortcrust for quiche is to add baking powder to the dough and prick the base before baking blind. The other says that the purpose of the baking beans is to prevent the pastry from rising therefore bp is pointless and pricking the base only risks the liquid from leaking out before the quiche is set. Is this just a case of six of one or is one the "proper" way?
     
  2. coffeekitten

    coffeekitten

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    I dont know how adding baking powder wouldn't make it puff up. but im not to sure about that yet. But pretty much you could use with the pricking or the weighted meathod. Weighted works better but is more time consumeing for large batches (especially minis) but i suggest removing the weights half way through to prevent the edges from over cooking. As for pricked... it works ok but then you get some holes, and for a liquidy baked custard like quiche, i like the weighted method. Also make sure you use a mealy pie dough as opposed to a flakey to reduce saturating the crust.

    Chocolate kisses :lips:
    Coffee Kitten
     
  3. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Is there a reason you don't want to use a traditinal pie dough for this? If done correctly, it will puff up nicely without BP. The weights will prevent it from bubbling up in the middle, and eliminate the need to prik the dough. Remove the weights 3/4 of the way through baking, to give the bottom a chance to catch up with the rest.
     
  4. ozarkrose

    ozarkrose

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    If "proper" is really what you're after, a pate brisee dough is how it is traditionaly prepared and the filling is poured into a unbaked shell. If you're not preparing in the traditional manner, choose your technique as it fits your production manner.