propane fired range & oven

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by charron, Apr 9, 2010.

  1. charron

    charron

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    I'm looking to expand my very small kitchen, and I've already got the go-ahead from the inspectors to reno a large window into a door to access a deck area outside.  We have bbqs, but I'd really like to be able to do the hot-holding and baking outside this summer.

    Anyone have any experience or recommendations regarding propane-fired ranges?  We can't get natural gas here, and electric is out of the question (for so many reasons).

    Any idea where, in southern Ontario, I might be able to find new or (preferably, for budget) used kit?  I'd need at least two burners and an oven.  A griddle would be glorious.  There is a six burner, 24" griddle, two oven unit that I've seen online that has me salivating... it looks so darn purdy... but I've never had to shop for one before so I'm at a bit of a loss what to look for.

    help?
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2010
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Charron,

    Every stove/cooktop is capable of using either LPG or natural gas. It's just a matter of how the venturii valves are configured.

    On older stoves you had to use a conversion kit. On newer ones the adjustments are built-in, and your installer (the same guy who installs your gas tanks, gooseneck, and gas lines will adjus the burners to run on LPG.

    If you buy new, some higher-end models can be factory ordered in the configuration you need.

    What I'm saying is, don't worry about the fuel source. Pick the unit you like based on features and price. It will run on LPG.

    As I've mentioned elsewhere, the best set-up is a dual tank rig. That assures you never run out of gas, even if deliveries are slow.
     
  3. charron

    charron

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    That is awesome to know, KYH.  Happily, propane supply is not something I need to worry about.  We are, firstly, a variety store in the country; propane refills are something we sell.  There is a 10,000lb storage tank on the edge of my yard. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rollsmile.gif

    Any thoughts on which brand is most reliable?  Or if there are sources for second-hand units?  As much as I'd want pretty, I'll settle for not blowing the budget at the start of our busy season.  That said, if used units tend to be problematic I'll shell out for new.  When I worked for others my station was usually grill, griddle, fryer, or sandwich/salad, but I remember the regular cursing-out the ovens got.  Can't remember what brand they were... only that one had to be kicked repeatedly to work.  I don't have time for that. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif
     
  4. charron

    charron

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    Is there no opinion on new stuff?  No source for second-hand?  I really could use some advice...
     
  5. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Most of the new stuff is good, gas equipment in N.America is not rocket science, and is very basic.

    Any restaurant supply store will cary second hand equipment.  Remember though, when you convert from nat. gas to propane, you will experience an aprox. 10% loss in fire power.  I'm not a plumber and don't know the exact reason, but if you study on-lne Mnfctr's sites (Garland, Blodgett, Wolf, etc) and look at the BTU ratings for nat. gas, and propane, you'll see the btu difference.

    The risk of buying 2nd hand gas equipment is very low.  The things that "Go" on this type of equipment are typically thermostats and thermo-couplers--both of which are easily replaced.  LIke I said, this equipment is not rocket science.