Professional recipe vs home?

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by toffee, Jul 18, 2017.

  1. toffee

    toffee

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    May sound like a silly question but the question is. What is the difference between a professional recipe used in a restaurant kitchen vs a home recipe if there really is one? Kitchen i work in, the chef is very open minded. Any menu ideas we have we can pitch to him and he will consider it. But majority of recipes i know are ones from home, or from random cook books. So what would the difference be between a professional recipe vs a home recipe? In any course, from appetizers to desserts even baking and pastry recipes.
     
  2. chefross

    chefross

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    No silly questions here.
    There is no difference.
    Chefs look through countless articles,recipes, cookbooks, television programs, magazines to get creative ideas for their menus.
    Chefs are always looking for new angles, new tastes, presentations, flavors, etc.
    Who's to say that a Betty Crocker recipe hasn't shown up in a casual or upscale menu.
     
  3. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    The only difference, really, is in the amount it makes. Most home recipes are calculated for anywhere from 2 to 8. Restaurant recipes can be geared for anything from 20 to 2000. There are a few other differences, at least when I write recipes. When I write recipes for home cooks, I assume they know nothing and will spell out every step. When I write recipes, in a restaurant setting, I make assumptions that my cooks have some knowledge so I may give very sparse instructions. But beyond these differences, Chefross is right, they can be one and the same.
     
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    I must add too that the basis of every recipe gleaned from any source must be that it be recreated consistently... and that the ingredients necessary to make the dish must be available year round.
    So while at home the item might only be made a few times a year while the restaurant does it daily for as long as it's in the menu.
     
  5. toffee

    toffee

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    Thank you both for your responses! So basically key things to look for is ingredient availability and the yield. I live and work on the shore so some things are harder to come across then others. The way my chef chooses a recipe is if it can be done fast, and or can be made up ahead of time. Being my first real kitchen job, and learning as i go. Is this the ususal way a kitchen chooses its items on the menu? Any sauce that is for an item made ahead of time in a large batch or anything that can be plated up ahead of time.
     
  6. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    It really all depends on the type of restaurant, and the item. When it comes to sauces, some sauces can be made to order, but others are often made in larger batches and just enough is pulled for each service. But its really hard to give a general guideline that encompasses all types of restaurants and all types of foods. It often comes down to what can be made ahead without loss of quality.
     
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  7. toffee

    toffee

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    Alright good to know thank you. Where i work is a private club, but we have 2 kitchens. Bar kitchen where i work where there is only 2 cooks and 1 dishwasher. and the dinning room kitchen where they have 4 maybe 5 cooks depending on the day. Food type is similar, steaks, burgers, some sandwiches. bar kitchen has no saute items tho.
     
  8. Mia Burks

    Mia Burks

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    Actually there is no difference. Its all about cooking. Yeah only the amount can vary.
     
  9. foodpump

    foodpump

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    For me, the only difference is how the ingredients are measured. That is to say, a professional recipie's amounts are given in weight. This is always the case for baking, and is always the case for meats and protiens like cheese. But yeah, Betty Crocker has shown up on some of my menus...
     
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  10. chefross

    chefross

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    Recipes in weights are fairly new foodpump. Most of the older recipes still use measuring...especially in baking. Weighing is so much more precise.
     
  11. foodpump

    foodpump

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    In the U.S., yes, but otherwise, no. How do you think the name "pound cake" came about? (take one pound of sugar, one pound of butter, etc). Bread has always been sold by weight, which means it has to be portioned out (scaled) by weight. There are surviving ancient egyptian hyrglyphics ( sp.?) showing this process too. And I've never, ever heard of a butcher selling meat by the piece, hundreds of tales about crooked scales, yes, but selling by piece or volume, no.

    Thing is, as a business, you buy all of your ingredients by weight. In order for a business to survive, you have to sell for more than what you paid for your ingredients. Is there anyone stupid enough to count out how many cups of sugar there sre in a 25 lb bag? Or flour? Scooped, leveled off, sifted, or well packed?
     
  12. chefross

    chefross

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    To answer your facetious question...."yes" there are stupid owners and Chefs out there that figure how many cups to a 25 pound bag of sugar and or flour. I am with you on weights but can only shake my head when see the rest. OY!!
     
  13. jimyra

    jimyra

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    I must be stupid. I use conversion charts and calculators such as http://www.onlineconversion.com/weight_volume_cooking.htm to convert from volume to weight and so on. Converting traditional recipes to quantity and preparing shopping orders knowing how many cups of sugar per pound is useful. I use both at different times and for different uses. When buying fresh berries at the farmers market I go to the berries are sold in pints and gallons. If my portion control is a four oz. ladle how many pounds of green beans do I need to order for four hundred portions? Yes, I must be stupid.
     
  14. Loredana Canalis

    Loredana Canalis

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    For sure is better home
     
  15. scott livesey

    scott livesey

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    if you can convert recipe to weight(grams are easiest) then it is real easy to go from 6 portions to 135. Berries at farmer's market are sold both ways, my favorite U-Pik is pounds, most home recipes in cups. makes my head hurt.
     
  16. chefross

    chefross

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    I fail to understand your reasoning here unless you are operating a catering situation where you need to have no leftovers.
    Other than that I don't get why you need to know how many cups, or ounces, or gallons are in your product, except mayber for inventory purposes.

    Your example of a four oz. ladle for green beans is strange. A ladle is liquid measurement and you are trying to stuff green beans into it? Did I miss something?

    Also a comment on the thread....If you take a recipe you found and want to use it in your restaurant, you really are just using the recipe without increasing the amounts (unless you are making quantity for banquets) If said find yields 4 portions, you are simply making one for an order. If it's a pan sauce that goes with the recipe, all the better.
     
  17. jimyra

    jimyra

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    A little picky on the ladle but you are correct I should have said four oz. portion spoon. If I serve 50 4 oz servings a night of green beans and my purveyor delivers produce twice a week how many bushels of green beans do I order? Yes I am pricing a catered event and need 500 four oz. portions how many bushels or pounds of green beans do I need to order to keep my food cost on target?
     
  18. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Never understood the bushel thing. Virtually all domestic produce here in Canada (and Europe, and Asia)are sold by weight. The only exceptions are U.S. produce. Never understood why peppers are sold in 1 1/8 cubic Bushels, yes, one and one eighth. Citrus sold by count (ie 72 count navel oranges). Just doesn't make sense.....
     
  19. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    I guess it would depend on if the home in question belonged to a good cook.

    mimi
     
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  20. Jain Daugh

    Jain Daugh

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    I too use weight (gram/pound scale) for my home cooking. Its just more accurate and faster too - tossing all dry ingredients into same measuring bowl. But since I am baking/cooking at home and dealing with 'home' oriented recipes, I have developed a 'short hand' equivalent conversion chart - 1 cup flour = 100 grams, 1 cup sugar = 200 grams, 1 cup powdered sugar = 100 grams, 1 cup rice = 150 grams etc. Not only does this make preparing ingredients easier/faster, it allows me to increase recipes with better results. (I make my own 'biscuit' mix)