Processor & Cookies

489
10
Joined Mar 3, 2002
A refrigerator cookie disaster. Never made them before (imagine!); never used the processor to make cookies either.

I have a KitchenAid which I have always used for cookies and cakes, but this recipe had processor instructions, so I gave it a try. I think part of the problem was that the butter was too cold when I started so that it took too long to cream it and hence the meltdown.

Apparently when I tried to cream the butter to light and fluffy, the heat of the processor liquified it. I completed the recipe and refrigerated it til it firmed up enough to form a roll. Is it worth bothering to bake them? Was it the cold butter?
 
131
10
Joined Mar 12, 2001
alexia, my thought is that you over creamed the butter. Most of the recipes that I have for a processor state that you should only PULSE the ingredients so that you don't over mix or over heat the batter. I have a Cuisinart Super Pro and I mix cookies up in the all the time. Yours will probably be just fine after they have chilled. Cookies don't last long enough in our house to make a difference.

I have two old standby refridgerator cookies that came from a church cook book. An oatmeal and shortening one called Freezer Pleasers (can you guess where they are stored?;) ). The other is brown sugar one that they band kids named "Put me to Bed" cookies. They got them before bed at band camp and couldn't remember the name for them. After 6 years (2 sons, both trumpets) the name stuck. They must have been a hit as I still get calls from college kids asking me if I'm baking them cookies!
They aren't fancy tray cookies, but good comfort cookies.......
 
489
10
Joined Mar 3, 2002
Thanks Jill, they did bake up fine. Light, crisp, lemony, but much too sugary. I don't have the "feel" of baking enough to know how much I could reduce the sugar from the recipe without wrecking the cookie.

When my kids were young, I was more of a brownie, cake, or pie sort of mom. Piling cookies on sheets and hanging around while they baked, sheet after sheet, was not my thing. But now, living alone, making batches of things that can be frozen and then later baked in small batches for one or two people would work for me. I do that with scones and I'm planning to try it with croissants.

Paradoxically, I find that eating really good desserts helps me to enjoy sweets without over-indulging. Give me a box of bad cookies and I can't stop myself. One of the unpronouncable "additives" in processed sweets is not a preservative but an addictative.
 
Top Bottom