Problems with blind baking a quiche crust

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by kokopuffs, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    The recipe used is listed in the BAKERS COMPANION by KA.

    Once the pie crust is ready to be placed into the oven, it's lined with a piece of aluminum foil that's been oiled, the side that's facing the crust.  Pie weights are then added.  The crust is baked for 15 minutes at 425F using a metallic quiche pan made by Fat Daddio's.

    At the end of the bake time the setup is placed on a baking rack and the foil containing the pie weights lifted off.  The problem is that the crust sticks to the oiled foil and rips apart.  Also the floor of the crust is soggy with fat (butter and lard) dripping through the removeable bottom of the pan.

    Should I attempt blind baking without the foil?  Would the use of parchment paper be a better alternative???

    HELP PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!   8^()
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2012
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I hate baking blind with with weights....

    You can't fight gravity, but you can make gravity work for you.

    This is what I do:

    -You need two identical baking forms.

    -line one out as per rnormal

    -Stick the other one on top, so the dough is "sandwiched" inbetween the two

    -Place this contraption upside down on a baking tray and bake

    -Invert and remove the outer form
     
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Good hearing from an older member, FP.  [email protected], Zen and the art of baking.  Will certainly do so next time.  Fat Daddios, here I come again for another pan.   Oh boy oh boy, a new gadget.   8^)

    I had also thought of drilling holes in the floor of the removable flat pan.

    So I assume that you, too, had problems with fat leaking/draining through your pan until your discovery!!??
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2012
  4. Iceman

    Iceman

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    WOW. That is a really cool suggestion.

    Maybe though, remember to have a pan underneath if it's gonna drip. 
     
  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    What I plan to do is set my DeBuyer carbon steel fry pan underneath the quiche pans to catch the drippings.  I can't think of a better way to season the DeBuyers.  But as FoodPump mentioned, the setup is placed in a baking tray (sheet pan my guess).
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2012
  6. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Those blind bake instructions are kinda scary...what's up with the KA people?

    If you have not yet purchased the extra pan (def gonna try foodpump's tip) just  dock the pastry and use parchment and beans (I have set aside pintos just for this purpose).

    Oiled foil on top of fat and flour....oy.

    What's gonna be INSIDE this much talked about quiche crust?

    mimi
     
  7. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Wait a minute, you stated "...oiled foil..."  Now I stated oiled foil and it stuck to the floor of the crust.  Do you mean parchment solely??????
     
  8. chefross

    chefross

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    Your problem seems more about the dough consistency than your method.

    Are you working with chilled dough?

    Aluminum foil or parchment...it does not matter...neither of them should stick in any instance.

    Use more flour to roll out the crust. It should not be sticky at all.

    I pre-bake my quiche crusts with foil and beans for about 7-8 minutes at 425.

    I open the oven, remove the foil and beans, then pour in my ingredients.

    Small trick here......I always add cheese and ingredients firstly then make a small hole in the center where I brush away the ingredients....why?

    It makes it so that when slicing a piece the end will be a sharp point. If their are ingredients in the way....you don't get a descent point.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2012
  9. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Since I don't know type of dough or makeup of it. I would say you are not baking it long enough. The foil acts as an insulator in the beginning not allowing enogh heat and trapping moisture in(therefore soggy crust.. When you put crust in punch some pin  holes in it and bake, when almost done press down on it.Then finish baking. Or put another pie plate on top with a circle of parchment in between. Fill the upper pie plate with beans or weights and bake, pull off when 3/4 done so slight browning takes place and dough is baked.
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    This dough was rather sticky when finished blending.It was gathered together, flattened to 1 inch between a section of plastic wrap and then placed in the fridge for half an hour.  It was then rolled out onto a flour covered pastry cloth prior to placing in the pre chilled quiche pan.

    Ingredients:

    1/2 C White Lily AP flour

    1 C White Lily Bread Flour (4g protein per serving, and White Lily seem lighter than other flours, particularly lighter than KA AP flour)

    EDIT 1/4 C lard (NOT 1/2 C lard as originally listed)

    1 cube (4 oz) Land O Lakes unsalted butter

    1/3 C cold water
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2012
  11. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Was butter and shortening mixed in or cut in?  Pie doughs are mostly cut in
     
  12. foodnfoto

    foodnfoto

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    Wow the ratio of butter to flour is way off. Way too much fat for the flour, imo. I use a 3:1 ratio of volume ratio of flour to fat and it works out very well. Also the amount of water to flour is crazy.

    Try this;

    3 cups AP flour

    2 teaspoons sugar (makes for very nice browning)

    1 teaspoon salt

    1 cup (8 ounces) cold butter, cut into small pieces

    1/2 cup ice water

    Toss the dry ingredients together in a large bowl or pulse in a food processor. Add the butter and toss to coat pieces with flour then cut in until you have a consistency that looks like sand and pebbles. Alternatively, add the butter to the food processor and pulse quickly about 6-7 times-sand and pebbles again.

    Drizzle in the water and toss quickly with a rubber spatula until it comes together. Pat into a disk and chill for about 20 minutes to allow the proteins to relax.

    Roll between two floured sheets of parchment, lifting occasionally to sprinkle with flour to prevent sticking.

    The dough should be firm, like a sheet of soft leather.

    press into the desired pan and chill again. Place a piece of parchment on top and fill with old beans, rice, coffee paper clips anything to weigh it down.

    Bake at 375 for about 20 minutes until bottom looks a little dry when to lift up the parchment to check.

    I generally bake it longer for quiche because the filling is very wet when added and will tend to make the bottom soggy.
     
  13. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Ed has totally hit the nail.

    Shouldn't matter what you use, your pastry should not drip.

    Sticky dough is a hint of too much liquid,and the measurement of it in a pastry recipe should just be a suggestion, a humid day, for instance, you can most likely use less.

    When faced with a sticky dough, roll out with extra bench flour.

    I was given this tip from my Gma Van...place all ingredients (except the liquid, that goes into the fridge) in the freezer for a few hours and then proceed with the recipe.

    The fats should be already cut into small pieces before freezing.

    She taught me with the 2 knives procedure, now I use my food processor (2 knives take wayyy too much time when making multiple crusts, lol)

    So I stick the processor blade in the freezer, also.

    IDK, may just be voodoo, but my crusts are (almost) always perfect.

    I then roll out between two pieces of parchment (I re-use one to line the crust for blind baking) , flip into the dish, dock , line and weigh down (beans or weights doesn't matter, I am frugal so just use my (cheap!) beans over and over) and bake until almost light brown.

    You didn't answer my question....quiche is a fave supper at my house and we are always looking for new combos!

    mimi
     
  14. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Ah!

    Forgot the sugar!

    Thanks, f &f...

    OT here...how did your savory pies do this weekend?

    mimi
     
  15. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    * Exported from MasterCook *

                          3-2-1 Pie Crust (Pâte Brisée)

    Recipe By     :pete V. McCracken, as adapted from "Ratio-The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking" by Michael Ruhlman
    Serving Size  : 8     Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories    : Dough                           Pies
                    Savory                          Sweet
                    Tarts or Quiches

      Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    --------  ------------  --------------------------------
      12            ounces  flour
      4             ounces  butter -- cold
      4             ounces  lard -- cold
      2             ounces  ice water -- maybe as much as 4 ounces
      1              pinch  salt -- about 1/2 teaspoon

    Combine flour and fats in a mixing bowl and rub fats with fingers until you have small beads of fat and plenty of pea sized chunks.

    Add ice water gradually and a good pinch of salt and mix gently, just until combined DO NOT OVER MIX!

    shape into two equal disks, wrap in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 15 minutes or until ready to roll out

    Source:
      ""Ratio" by Michael Ruhlman, page 25"
    Copyright:
      "Copyright ©2010 all rights reserved, by Pete V. McCracken, 657 Village Green St., Porterville, CA 93257 (559) 784-6192 [email protected]"
    Yield:
      "1 pie shell and lid"
                                        - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 384 Calories; 26g Fat (61.4% calories from fat); 5g Protein; 32g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 45mg Cholesterol; 135mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 5 Fat.


    Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0


     
     
  16. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Thats the way I learned it, Thats why its called cut -in. Sugar will make it brown faster.. I have also seen recipes that add an egg .I don't
     
  17. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I think mixed in.
     
  18. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Chef EdB, Flipflop, Pete and to others:  THANKS!  And yes, too much fat and I failed to place all cut up and dry ingredients into the freezer for and hour or two prior to forming and shaping the dough.  Will strive next week to correct, will be baking two Q. Lorraines, one for me and the other for a friend's family, following the recipe (modified crust) listed in the KA Bakers Companion tome.
     
  19. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Pete, "12 oz flour" by weight, meaning approx 3C of flour??  Am I correct?  3C of flour for every 8 oz fat give or take...?

    ...and actually I used 2 oz lard (1/4 C) in the recipe which has since been corrected:

    1 1/2 C flour

    4oz (1 stick) butter

    2 oz (1/4 C) lard   <========  THE CORRECTION.

    salt

    Seems according to all of your proportions, that 6 oz fat calls for more than just 1 1/2 C flour!      8^)

    Best,

    -T
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2012
  20. pateachoux

    pateachoux

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    There's no need for knives, food processors or pastry cutters. Use your fingers. Toss the butter in the flour, then break it up until it's the size of peas. Use cold butter or shortening and ice water. There's also no need for spatulas or spoons. Mix the dough with your hands. It's messy, but it works. Knead the dough right there in your bowl, making sure you fold the dough over on itself several times, but not so much that the fat melts. As someone else already said, shape into a disk (kind of like a hamburger patty), wrap in plastic wrap, then refrigerate for 20 minutes. You don't need parchment paper, either. Just use plenty of BREAD flour on your bench and always keep the circle of dough moving--roll, quarter turn, roll, quarter turn, etc. You'll have to constantly make sure you have loose flour underneath your dough. It's quite simple, actually. Practice makes perfect. Food processors will make a mealy dough. Most people prefer flaky.