Prime Rib

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by alfonzo calia, Mar 27, 2002.

  1. alfonzo calia

    alfonzo calia

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    :bounce: I have a restaurant that sits 30 people, I started putting prime rib on the menu. At 125 degrees rare I take it out,
    It's perfect! Some customers request the prime rib to be medium, medium well, and well done. I don't sell enough of it to make three diffrent prime ribs.

    Question #1:
    After the prime rib cools down, do I bone it out or do I carve it one bone at a time?

    Question #2:
    I have one oven set at about 350 to 400 degrees to bring it up to the diffrent approximate cooking times. For an example at medium an up when remove from the oven the piece of prime rib has blood on the top of. It doesn't look right to me, I do not want to serve it that way. What am I doing worng? Is there a better way of bringing up to the approximate cooking time to solve the blood problem?

    Chef: Alfonzo: :rolleyes: :chef:
     
  2. thebighat

    thebighat

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    I used to work for a guy who claimed he was "Master of the Rib Disguise." When it was too rare, he blotted it with a gross dirty side towel. When it was too medium, he squeezed it so more juice would well up on the surface. Then he'd trickle a little of the juice from the pickled crabapples on it. It all seemed to work. But then, this is the same guy who got behind on a rib on New Year's eve, and put it in the fryolator.
    Seriously, most people I've seen deal with this kept a container of hot au jus on the range and would just give an underdone piece a few minutes in that.
     
  3. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree with thebighat. The best way to bring up prime rib per order is to dip in hot jus until it it the temperature you want. The down side to this and any other method for bringing the meat up to temp. per order, is that it won't look as beautiful as if you had roasted it to the desired temp. The outside of the piece of meat will turn grey from coming in contact with the hot jus.
     
  4. katbalou

    katbalou

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    you could try this: place the cut of meat on a sizzle platter and place the outside leaves from either iceberg or romaine lettuce over the meat . throw it in the oven until done. the leaves keep the meat from browning on the top. this has always worked for me.
     
  5. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Hi Chefcast,

    This is an old post I copied and pasted to your thread.
    Try doing a search on the site.

    Here is how I prepare a 109 (prime rib).

    When you order your meat specify if you want "choice" or "prime"
    For prime rib I have no problem with "choice" $2.50 less a # than prime.

    Pre heat your oven (I use a convection) to 325 degrees
    If the meat is netted or tied remove it.
    Pull back the fat flap on the top,This is usally seperated by the meat house.Take a good quility mustard and spread evenly on the meat,season with kosher salt and fresh milled black pepper. Cut about a cup of fresh rosemary and thyme and sprinkle it on the mustard and pat in.Then if you like you can dust with garlic and onion powder then close the fat flap and tie in between the bones. Turn the meat over and seasson with S&P on the bottom.
    Place the roast on top of a medium miropoix and pack it under the sides so it does not burn.
    Place in the oven for appx 3-3 1/2 hours...This is for a 22-24 # rib.
    Cook until the internal temp is 125 degrees.
    Pull from the oven and let rest for 15 minutes.Remove the roast and put the pan on high heat on top of your stove,Deglaze your pan with red wine (4 cups) reduce by half and add a gallon of beef stock ,simmer and check seasoning and adjust, cook for 20 minutes and skim the fat,stain into a clean sauce pan and keep warm.As far as the roast in conserned I remove the bones before service.Some places still serve a bone in "king cut" but for me thats just to much beef and doesn't translate well to the bottom line.
    I also serve yorkshire pudding with the roast.
    I hope this helps
    cc


    __________________
    Baruch ben Rueven / Chana

    More and More food is coming canned or pre-packaged, including food for thought.
     
  6. marmalady

    marmalady

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    Prime rib - sigh - I'm the only meat eater in my house - sigh - I love prime rib - sigh. Have to go now, and wipe the dribble off my keyboard!
     
  7. chefboy2160

    chefboy2160

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    Alfonzo , giving the customer what they want with prime rib can be very frustrating . Here is my line on it . Working in a large hotel casino with multi outlets we cooked between 50 and 120 primes a night . We cooked them to about 120 as we were using boneless 110s , if you are using 109s then I would go to about 125 . With 109s I always let the roast rest for about 20 to 30 mins and the I take the rack of ribs off of the prime . Save these until you have enough for a BBQ rib special , great for the bottom line and your customers will love it . we always tried to produce at least 10 to 15 extra primes each night which we would use as reheats . Just cover with plastic wrap and foil and bring back up to temp the next day . It will now be well done but I use these primes for my medium and above customers . It works much better than the au jus heating method as presentation is much better . On your size of operation just save the piece you have left from the night before and use it for that purpose . This realy works as I have cooked a few herds of beef to learn it . By the way , Ill take my prime Medium Rare always . Good luck and keep cookin . :chef:
     
  8. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Just as a follow up to chefboy's post. How does everyone like their prime rib done? My choice lies on the opposite extremes. I either like mine almost 'mooing'. The rarer the better!!! Or I like it really well done, but only, and I do mean only if it is the end cut with all the crunchies on it.
     
  9. marmalady

    marmalady

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    Ditto, Pete!
     
  10. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Just a quick question guys, how do you chill your whole primes? And I'm with Pete, knock the horns off the thing and serve it up!

    Kuan
     
  11. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    To chill a rib, I always cut it in half, and chilled it on a rack in the cooler for about 1/2 before wrapping it.
     
  12. riverrun

    riverrun

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    Big Hat i think we started under the same chef:p
    And yes Ive been doing prime rib for sometime and i've never run into a problem doing it with the dip in the Au Jus although for more well done pieces i put in the oven so not to make it to toughcause boiling it will.
     
  13. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I would never allow my jus to boil when bringing up a piece of Prime Rib. You would get a hockey puck!! Hot jus, kept in the steam well will get your PR done quite quickly.
     
  14. thebighat

    thebighat

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    Giuseppe Gaetano LaSorsa...dba "Joe". Never saw the guy make an inelegant move. His unvarying habit when he took the ribs out of the oven was to take the fat cap with tongs and fork, scream out "Greasy $%^&*^%$#$ rib cap coming down!" and fling it into the empty tomato box at the saute station where I put dirty pans for the dishwasher. One night he came up to me and said "If the boss comes looking for me, you don't know where I am" and he slid out the back door into the night and a job in North Carolina. I know he's moved back to this area, but I have yet to run into him.