Prime Rib Steaks

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Joined Sep 18, 2015
Hello all. Seeking advice.

I have a banquet for 200+ all with Prime Rib Steaks. I am wondering the best method to get this done. Here are 2 ideas I have

Since the guests know and agree to the steaks being all one temp. Here's what I came up with.

1) Cook all the beef to 120-125 slice and serve. (Very labour intensive and can lead to panic slicing and end up with waste)

2) Cook all joints to 110 (More for colour than anything) Cut into steaks and tray up with Paper on bottom and top and reheat the day of service in hot oven until temp is reached.

Sides are Garlic Mash with Vegetable medley, Steak is topped with Garlic and shallot Butter. Horseradish on side.

Any pointers, assistance.  

Chef Scotty
 
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726
Joined May 5, 2010
Hello Chef Scotty and welcome to ChefTalk

What temp was agreed upon?

120-125 is very rare to serve.

135-140 would be medium rare going on medium.

Don't forget about the meat continuing to cook after taking it from the oven, so rest it a half hour before slicing.
 
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Joined Sep 20, 2015
The best way is to cut all the steaks and mark on grill...then sheet pan and finish in oven...we do big banqs all the time and this is the fastest way to do it...i assume its plated so i would suggest an assembly line setup...if you want them pink on the plate then ur best option is to cook them at a very low temp for a long time...ie 200 for several hours it will kepp it pink but render the blood so u not swimming in it...also makes cutting easier
 
1,764
257
Joined Dec 23, 2004
 
Hello all. Seeking advice.

I have a banquet for 200+ all with Prime Rib Steaks. I am wondering the best method to get this done. Here are 2 ideas I have

Since the guests know and agree to the steaks being all one temp. Here's what I came up with.

1) Cook all the beef to 120-125 slice and serve. (Very labour intensive and can lead to panic slicing and end up with waste)

2) Cook all joints to 110 (More for colour than anything) Cut into steaks and tray up with Paper on bottom and top and reheat the day of service in hot oven until temp is reached.

Sides are Garlic Mash with Vegetable medley, Steak is topped with Garlic and shallot Butter. Horseradish on side.

Any pointers, assistance.  

Chef Scotty
I'm just slightly confused- are you serving a rib roast or a steak?  If you're talking about what we colloquially call "prime rib" then it roast it to the desired temp and slice it to order.  The specifics depend on the type of equipment you have available.  The ideal situation would be an Alto-Sham and a big Hobart slicer!  If you have a Witco/Alto-Sham then cook at a low temp and have it kick over to 'hold' for an hour or two to distribute the heat.  This will give you a very good, even edge to edge doneness at whatever temp you want.  A meat slicer will be very consistent and pretty fast.  Almost as good would be to just have one guy/gal with good knife skills and a good eye slicing them as you need them.  200 isn't really all that many people to slice by hand.

If you don't have a Sham you'll have to experiment a bit til you know your oven.  In a regular oven you can either start at 500[sup]o[/sup] F for about 40 minutes then turn off the oven, start at a high temp and lower it to 250 or so, or do a low temp and sear at the end.  The closer you cook to the temp you want the meat to be (ie low delta-T) the more evenly done it will be and the less carry over cooking you'll have.  If you roast at 350 the whole time you'll have to pull the primes 15-20[sup]o[/sup] F lower than you want to serve the meat.  If you cook at higher heat you must allow for carry over and a period for the meat to rest.  I'd suggest an hour if possible.

I would suggest you cut the meat as close to service as possible.  If necessary you could cut one or two rib roasts a little ahead of plating, then cut them while the first batch is being plated.

No matter what was agreed ahead of time there are always a few people that will want theirs doner.  You can use end cuts for this or keep a pan of jus on the stove to bring up a few slices to temp.
 
2,238
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Joined Feb 17, 2010
Roast Prime Rib or steaks? I'm confused........Prime rib is a roast, Steaks are grilled. You want to top with butter, Need some clarification is it a roast or steak.

Sliced prime rib for 200 is not difficult. One dedicated person to slicing, has to be someone that can cut meat consistently and do nothing else. You have to know how many portions you expect to get out of each rib. Boneless is very easy, bone in a bit harder.
 
2,236
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Joined Oct 31, 2012
Option two would seem to be the more labor intensive. 

Option one is cook, rest, slice, serve. 

I always cook tenderloin to 125, let it rest and it comes out beautiful medium rare. I haven't done prime rib in a long time but I would think it would be the same but as Chefross points out, resting is the key. 

      Will you be doing the slicing by yourself? I don't know what you mean by panic slicing. If everything else is in readiness before plating begins, no reason for anyone to panic. You can make a jig, like in woodworking, so each slice is measured and cut to the same thickness.              With good overall timing and three or four people slicing, the entire process should not be that difficult. A little bit of explaining your expectations to the slicers before hand to make sure everyone is on the same page and a watchful eye during plating should take care of that. 
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
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Joined Oct 7, 2001
I have done many Prime Rib banquet dinners in my time and as chefbuba said, they are pretty easy.  In fact, they were one of the easiest, and thus one of my favorite, meals to do for large parties.  For 200 people I would only have 1 or 2 people cutting.  It's not difficult.  Give each cutter a scale so that they can spot check their cuts every once in a while (no need to check every one if you have a couple of solid people cutting).

Sorry, chefwriter, but I disagree with the "jig" idea.  Prime Ribs can be inconsistent, not only from 1 to another, but from end to end.
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
7,117
546
Joined Jun 11, 2001
You slice and serve.  YOU, slice, no one else.

You can hold this for a couple of hours in a hotbox, oven, or alto sham.  It just takes watching and temping if you've never done it before.  If you use an oven put them in at 180F.  They'll be fine.

Anyone this is something you should be able to do with your eyes closed, and believe it, it's not that difficult.  It just takes attention.
 
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Joined Jul 15, 2012
These kinds of parties are easy! Depending on your market and the size of the cut... 200 x $35 = $7,000 for very easy work
 
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Joined Jun 16, 2011
This might be heresy in these parts, but when I've had to do events like this I've found using a deli slicer for the prime rib really makes things quick and consistent.
 
2,236
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Joined Oct 31, 2012
Pete. Lol, you're probably right about the jig. I think I was channeling my engineer father. He had solutions like that for many things.

I hope Scotty will come back and tell us how it went. 
 

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