Prime Rib bones - ideas?

5,716
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Joined Sep 5, 2008
Wow, those are truly beautiful!!!! Yummy. I would keep them simple: salt and pepper, grill them a bit fast at first, to get a nice bark, then slow and low to finish....
 
287
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Joined Sep 21, 2010
Thank you! They were pricey -- $14.95/pound but I got them half-price. That's why there's only 4 of them!
 
287
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Joined Sep 21, 2010
 
Wow, those are truly beautiful!!!! Yummy. I would keep them simple: salt and pepper, grill them a bit fast at first, to get a nice bark, then slow and low to finish....
That's exactly what I did -- and they turned out great! Will have to try these again.
 
63
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Joined Jan 1, 2016
After a several-weeks-long discussion of just this on another board I'm truly jealous that you were able to find these at that half-price deal ..... actually jealous that you found them at all.

The cooking method from most posters on that board went toward low and slow. Maybe 4-8 hours at 225° or so. I assumed that the longer end of that timing was for smoking or at least the off-heat side of a grill. IMHO how long you cook them is related to the amount of fat layers in the meat. You want the fat to melt away enough that it doesn't leave a fatty taste on the palate ..... at least I found that important with thick short ribs.
 
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287
106
Joined Sep 21, 2010
After a several-weeks-long discussion of just this on another board I'm truly jealous that you were able to find these at that half-price deal ..... actually jealous that you found them at all.

The cooking method from most posters on that board went toward low and slow. Maybe 4-8 hours at 225° or so. I assumed that the longer end of that timing was for smoking or at least the off-heat side of a grill. IMHO how long you cook them is related to the amount of fat layers in the meat. You want the fat to melt away enough that it doesn't leave a fatty taste on the palate ..... at least I found that important with thick short ribs.
I found the ribs at one of Vancouver's best butcher shops, they have everything but rarely half-price.

After a hard sear/grill, I roasted them at 300 F with an equally beautiful AA grain-fed chuck (Beouf a la Mode, pig's foot & all!) Meaty heaven!
 
5,716
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Joined Sep 5, 2008
Oh ok I see, more of pot roast I guess... I was picturing a dry roast, which I've never attempted with chuck. Thanks!
 
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Joined Jan 1, 2016

I finally found some beef ribs to satisfy my craving. They were short ribs still in 6"+ lengths with maybe 1.25" of meat on top of them. I slow-roasted in foil for 5 hours, then broiled for 10 minutes with newly added BBQ sauce to give them a bit more caramelized sear. They were good but had a fatty taste that I'm not partial to.

On another site it was suggested to me that I leave them slow-roasting at 125C/257F for TWELVE hours. That seems like a VERY long time to me. Anyone care to offer an opinion on this subject?
 
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225F/107C. Nothing I've ever seen about cooking ribs suggests a cold start, but I'm open. Doesn't that just add extra time? How would it affect fat?
 
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5,716
579
Joined Sep 5, 2008
225F/107C. Nothing I've ever seen about cooking ribs suggests a cold start, but I'm open. Doesn't that just add extra time? How would it affect fat?
Wow that's low. I'm not very experimented cooking at such low temperatures, and I've always wondered about the "12 hour short ribs" you see on menus of fancy restaurants.

In any case I've never seen a cold start suggested for oven or grill cooking either, but that's what helps rendering the fat in a pan when cooking bacon or duck.... some people start their chicken thighs in a cold pan... I do that with duck breasts with great success.. so basically it seems to be a good method for melting fat... although I'm not sure if this works only for surface-fat or if it could help (or not) in the case of short ribs. Hopefully someone with more experience can chime in.

BTW I suggested that because you complained about your ribs being too fatty.

It would certainly add more cooking time, yes. But then again you have to turn the oven on from cold anyway, so you rather than wait to put the meat in, maybe put it in when you start the oven.

Maybe next time you cook those you could try my suggestion with only one rib, and put the others in the hot oven, see if you can make a difference? Best way to know.
 
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