Pressure Cooking Shoulder

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by spawner, Sep 25, 2014.

  1. spawner

    spawner

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    Hello to all Chefs out there! I would like to start out by thanking you for all your creations, new ideas and work that you put into your craft, Thanks you from the bottom of my stomach!

    I am a fan of science and food working together to come up with new styles and flavors. I am stuck at the moment with my Pork experiment. I need to find a way to capture the flavors of 12 hour slow roasted pork in 40 mins. A challenge that may never work but I can't give in! 38 trials so far and some tasty results but not perfected yet. The tenderness is there but flavor is far from perfect. My task is to KISS(Keep It Simple Stupid) by using easy,healthy and minimum ingredients. Nothing simple about that! 

    Healthy just means I'm trying to stay away from Dr Pepper as a ingredient but not opposed to trying. Minimum means 5 ingredients would be ideal. Easy as in not making a stock first or browning meat first. Also ingredients that I don't have to google.

    So I am calling out for direction from the experts in the Back of the House. In return I can help guide you in the craft cocktail world the best I can but your probably set with that bottle Old Grand Dad tucked away on the shelf. Me too!

    Thanks for your time

    This guy
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    So what independent variables have you manipulated in your 38 trials thus far?
     
  3. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Who is your audience/customer for this? 

    You won't fool a person who has cooked or eaten the real thing and paid attention to the experience imho. That might not be your goal either.

    But you seem to be ruling out the important steps, such as searing and browning. That's a lot of flavor development, and texture. The bark is part of a good pork shoulder and you're throwing that out too. 
     
  4. spawner

    spawner

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    Ginger Beer, Liquid smoke(no thanks), apples, apple cider vinegar, Hawaiian salt(as a finishing salt and tried with cooking) lagers,lemons,limes, oranges, Pineapple juices, pork rub spices. Not all at once of course but these are just about all my trial recipes i kept tweaking with.
     
  5. spawner

    spawner

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    my self is audience for now. i like the challenge cause I've been told it can't be done. thats not my style. 

    I do realize I'm missing out on the bark by searing but i really want consistancy every time when i find my recipe. searing, i feel can change each time you sear so i want to rule it out for now but not opposed to it.
     
  6. tweakz

    tweakz

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    It'll never be the same, but have you tried a brine with some liquid smoke, and a sweetener?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2015
  7. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    So you've tried a bunch of different flavor elements.  OK, that's fine... but what is the "science" aspect?  What are the variations in pressure-cooking methods?  What else have you tried toreduce the cooking time?  I'm not understanding the goal of the "science" part of your question.

    At this point I can suggest that the best way to get BBQ that fast is to order take-out or delivery from a good BBQ restaurant.  :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2014
  8. spawner

    spawner

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    I guess the science part of it is the pressure cooking method. Not really science, more of a cooking method. That probably why I am FOH. The fact I can cook pork in 40 mins is what got my interest. Now I just want to bring flavor that is enjoyable and consistent.

    I was using Modern Cuisine At Home when I learned my cooking time to get a tender shred. I cut 3lb butt into 1.5 - 2 inch chunks, then season and add liquid. once i have pressure, reduce to low for 30 min. rest 5 min, depressurize with warm water. strain n shred.
     
  9. spawner

    spawner

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    The liquid smoke was overpowering with just a teaspoon that i went away from it. I could try and bring it back with a suggestion.
     
  10. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Ahhh, that helps understand.  I was about to ssuggest that you cut your butt into smaller pieces.  But you know that trick already.  Have you experimented with needling your butt too?

    Rather than give up on smoke flavor, try varying the amount and brand of liquid smoke.  I use Wrights when deperate but only in very small amounts.  There are other brands with a variety of smoke flavors.  If you really want smoke flavor, that is.

    If I were you (or if I had the time) I'd try to use some of your quick-cooking techniques to reduce the cook time on Todd English's recipe (Cooking in Everyday English).    It is a great recipe that meets most, if not all, of your criteria and goes good with a couple of sides, and then can be transformed into a meat sauce for pasta, or combined with BBQ sauce.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2014
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  11. spawner

    spawner

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    Not familiar with needling method. Ill looking into that too.

    thanks
     
  12. french fries

    french fries

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    I'm not sure how advantageous it really is to avoid the searing. It's not really time consuming, is really enjoyable to do, makes your whole house smell great, makes your whole family hungry, and really does completely change the flavor of the final dish.

    Sometimes I do not sear, but not because I want to cut down on the preparation time, just because I'm looking for a more subtle flavor profile, like in some tagines for example. 
     
  13. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    There is one pork shoulder recipe I make that is delicious, very simple, doesn't require searing and might be adaptable to a pressure cooker, though  it is the pork slowly cooking in the fat mixed with marinade that helps to give it a lot of flavor. It is cochinita pibil. Not barbecue but it is a Mexican pulled pork. It does require marinating the pork pieces in a mixture of bitter orange juice (or orange juice mixed with lime juice) and a healthy chunk of achiote paste which you whirl together in a blender with some salt--(careful: the achiote stains.)  I also throw in some minced garlic, though I'm not sure it is traditional. Traditionally, it is wrapped in banana leaves and cooked in a pit but a low oven works, too. You don't dump the marinade, but cook the pork in it after you've let it marinate for a good 8-24 hours. I've made it with and without wrapping it in banana leaves and it is fabulous either way. Serve it in tacos with quick pickled red onions.
     
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  14. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Maybe pressure-cooked carnitas could work? Cook under pressure until it can be pulled, then reduce and fry in the rendered fat without pressure? 
     
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  15. french fries

    french fries

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    Ooh now that sounds like a great idea. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
     
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  16. tweakz

    tweakz

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2015
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  17. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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  18. genemachine

    genemachine

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    There are techniques where you boil first and sear later, though - e.g. Sichuanese "twice cooked" dishes. Those might be most adaptable to pressure cooking. 
     
  19. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    To me the most flavourful way would be brown the shoulder (cut up) with soffritto or the holy trinity, deglaze, add whatever liquid you're going to need and lock it up. I've never owned or used a pressure cooker so I have no idea how that would work out with the pressure involved. 
     
  20. dcarch

    dcarch

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    "------I guess the science part of it is the pressure cooking method. Not really science, more of a cooking method. ----"

    Science is knowing the exact conditions of your experiment.

    Not all pressure cookers (PC) develop their same pressure, therefore they may cook at different temperatures. Different temperature will mean different cooking times.

    To find out exact temperature of your PC:

    Use a small metal container with a cover and fill with cooking oil. Make sure no water gets into the oil.

    Pressure steam the oil in your PC.

    Cook the oil for a little while and run the PC under cold water to release pressure.

    Measure oil temperature immediately with a good instant read thermometer.

    dcarch
     
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