Powder/dust

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by crackton, Nov 8, 2016.

  1. crackton

    crackton

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    Hi, new member here. I just wondered, what do you call powders/dusts like in the attached picture and does anyone know where I can find recipes?

    Thanks in advance :)
     
  2. modchef

    modchef

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    Hey Crackton,

    definitely not my area of expertise, but that looks like it could be a powder made with tapioca maltodextrin.  

    from "The Fat Duck Cookbook"
    I'de suggest starting at Modernist Cuisine and going from there, or here's a link to an article with more resources: 
     
  3. laurenlulu

    laurenlulu

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    Could it be beet powder? Powders can be made from freeze dried fruits and veggies
     
  4. ljokjel

    ljokjel

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    My guess is not maltodextrin. Malto is primarily used to make powder out of fat like chocolate, oil etc.
    The easiest way might be to just cut thinly, dry it over night (always over 60°c!), blender until powder, then pass through a sieve/chinoise or whatever the correct name would be in English.
    Or buy freeze-dried and blend.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2016
  5. french fries

    french fries

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    The recipe specifies miso, and I can't see it on the plate. Is it possible that somehow he used freeze dried miso colored with beet juice? 

    Another thought is that since the beets are cooked in salt, perhaps some of the salt that was right around the beet was ground into a fine powder.... but that's less likely as that would probably be too much salt on the plate. 
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2016
  6. crackton

    crackton

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    I think the ones I was looking for is mostly just dried/powdered veggies and stuff, but thanks to all anyways :)
     
  7. luis de vence

    luis de vence

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    I second the dehydration of coloroful veggies and processing it and passing it through a sieve. We do that alot with beets, chilis, etc.

    Mind you, the color of the veggies dies a bit when dried. Beet turns a pastel violet, etc.

    The powder in the image has a very rich purple color.
     
  8. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    If that plate has been "styled" for the photograph, as opposed to a real plate of actual edible food, the dust could be anything... including powdered food color or paint pigment.
     
  9. crackton

    crackton

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    I think the food is real, but on the other hand, unedited photos are rare these days
     
  10. french fries

    french fries

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    I remember watching the making of a beer commercial. It was unbelievable the amount of finicky tampering going on with the beer .... just to take a photograph of some beer in a glass. Coloring agents, water sprays to create bubbles on the outside of the glass, trips back and forth from the freezer to create frost, but most interestingly, the addition of specific soaps in the beer in order to create a more stable foam leaving more time to the photographer to take photos before the foam subsides....
     
  11. crackton

    crackton

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    Tbh, if you click on the pic and look on the left side, where the layer of powder is even and the pattern of the plate doesn't make highlights and shadows the color of the powder doesn't really look that vibrant at all.. Especially not compared to the actual beetroot on the right. Imo it's just the pattern (and colors) of the plate that makes it look extra pretty, especially on a small pic :)