Pots & Pans - Question

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by tooncookingtoon, May 8, 2014.

  1. tooncookingtoon

    tooncookingtoon

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    Hello,

    I might be asking too many questions in a row (some of you might notice I asked a question about knives recently), but I thought this would be a good question to ask, too. 

    I am getting married soon and am looking to use the opportunity to buy some nice pots/pans. Right now I use some older second-hand pots that stick pretty easily and are just all around bad. Being a starting cook, I am not sure what pots and pans I will really need  to cook at home. I've got a large pan that will do well for boiling all kinds of stuff, so I don't need that. Was thinking more along the lines of a frying pan & also a wok that are in a cheaper price range but perform well. 

    Thank you all for the wonderful welcome I've experienced here already!

    -cookingtoon
     
  2. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    what's your budget?
     
  3. tooncookingtoon

    tooncookingtoon

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    I am a student in college, and a lot of my guests will be students too. No idea how much pans are, but I am thinking the lower price range? My aunts/uncles/parents will probably buy them, if anyone does. 
     
  4. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Vollrath Tribute offered at KaTom.
     
  6. tweakz

    tweakz

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    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
  7. calorie master

    calorie master

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    Buy copper, it's classier plus it retains heat better.
     
  8. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    Good pots and pans are pretty pricey for the average college student budget, especially if you are talking about department store bridal registries. 

    A few less expensive options to consider asking for:

    Carbon Steel woks can be gotten at Asian groceries for much less than woks you can buy at department stores but they require some care or they rust. You probably also want a flat bottomed one, since home stoves don't put out the kind of heat that restaurants do. The kind of woks that sit on a ring don't get hot enough to sear the food in them.

    A cast iron skillet is another thing that is within a college student's budget and which I find extremely useful--it can go from stovetop to oven easily. Cast iron also requires care or it can rust but you can use a 12" skillet for a multitude of things once it is seasoned. I have a few different cast iron skillet sizes that I find very useful.

    Other people will probably chime in with a non-stick pan bias, but I find a decent 10" non-stick skillet useful for eggs and fritattas. These don't last forever but I have had both Calphalon and Cuisinart Green Gourmet ceramic ones that held up pretty well and neither cost a fortune.

    Another thing to consider asking for:  How are you fixed for decent knives? 
     
  9. tweakz

    tweakz

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    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
  10. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Terry, that's a great suggestion!

    Check out the ethnic markets

    I've picked up some knives there too, not the best, but functional and budget-friendly
     
  11. tweakz

    tweakz

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  12. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    I just happened to run across this on Pinterest--Wok purchasing and care:

    http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-sea...-the-kitchn-171893?crlt.pid=camp.c8wEcFNpMfZd

    As for cast iron seasoning and care--there are a million different approaches/opinions on how best to season a cast iron skillet. Some of those opinions are very heated. Do a little googling and you'll find a lot of info. My pans are Lodge, so I went with the advice on the Lodge website:

    http://www.lodgemfg.com/useandcare/seasoned-cast-iron
     
  13. tweakz

    tweakz

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  14. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    The thing I use most besides skillets is an enameled cast iron dutch oven for soups, stews, curries and braises. This is also a stove top to oven piece of equipment. You can also bake no-knead bread in one. You can spend a lot for one. Or you can buy/ask for a perfectly serviceable Lodge for around $50. It may not last as long as a $300 Le Creuset but it gets high marks as a Best Buy from Cook's Illustrated.
     
  15. tweakz

    tweakz

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    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
  16. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Purchase them in a restaurant supply house. DONT BUY RETAIL I have pots that are over 50 years old and are still good as new. They are a bit heavier but you can will them to your children.
     
  17. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    WokShop.com and also KaTom.com.........................................
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2014