Potatoes Galore -help needed to freeze

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by dc sunshine, Nov 13, 2009.

  1. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    We all know a bargain when we see one. I saw 10kg/20lb bags of big floury potatoes for AUD2.00 - about US2.50 etc etc( dirt cheap) so I went silly and bought 2.

    All my neighbours and friends did the same, so I can't share. (That was my initial thought...ah well). I think they have a shelf life of about 5 days, looking at them.

    SO....I'm going to use couple of pounds tonight as mash, was thinking of making extra mash to freeze in portions then bag, maybe cut 4 pounds for some for chips, blanch, open freeze on trays, bag and freeze.

    I could take some to the local charity house (thinking out loud here)

    Got plenty fridge/freezer space, any suggestions as to what else to do, freezing wise?
    I haven't access/knowledge for canning.

    TIA
     
  2. marmalady

    marmalady

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    hash browns/home fries freeze pretty well. I freeze gratins, too, with par-cooked potatoes and layered cheese and onion; just don't add the cream til it's thawed and ready to cook.
     
  3. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    thanks marmalady - hadn't thought of those. Got a feeling I'll get tired of peeling, but it will be worth it for the price.
     
  4. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    Mashed freeze well,but don't make with much milk, add milk and whip after thawing.

    Potato croquettes freeze very well
    Pear Potato William freeze well
    Au gratin freeze ok
    Diced freeze well if blanched first as do sliced
     
  5. mikelm

    mikelm

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    C'mon, DC...
    Why peel them at all? Flavor, texture, and nutrients are in the skin. We never peel. We scrub real good, cut out any blems, and make whatever we're doing.

    Sounds like you've got a lot of potatoes!

    Mike :roll:

    ps... What's this smilie about? :level: don't get it. :look:
     
  6. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    1. Peel and grate. Soak the gratings in a couple of changes of waters. Squeeze a batch of gratings as dry as possible. Spread them in a single layer on a baking sheet; cover with cling wrap; and palce in the freezer. When frozen (about 30 minutes) store them in a plastic freezer bag. Continue freezing until all the potatoes you set aside for grating are frozen.

    You may use the grated potatoes for any purpose, hash browns, latkes, etc., you desire.

    2. Bake those remaining potatoes you wish to store. Cut the baked potatoes in half and hollow out the skins.

    a. Reserve a portion of the skins for "crisp fried" or "crisp baked potato skins." Allow the skins to cool and dry, wrap individually in cling wrap and freeze in a large bag.

    b. Separate a corresponding portion of the baked potato "hearts," seal in portion size bags, and freeze. You may use these for any cooked potato purpose by defrosting and ricing. Mashed potatoes, potatoes dauphinois, e.g. I prefer to defrost and rice, rather than rice and defrost -- drier potatoes with better texture.

    c. Mash some portion of the remaining potato hearts in any way you desire -- you don't neeed to use a ricer -- and create a savory mix: For instance, cheese, scallion tops, crumbled bacon, sour cream, paprika, and butter. Stuff the remaining skins with the mixture, wrap each individually in cling or aluminum wrap and freeze in a large bag. When ready to use, defrost and reheat in a hot oven. Some people even use the microwave.

    A few humble ideas,
    BDL
     
  7. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Thanks for the great advice...there's ways I would not have thought of.

    Ed...I've done about 2kg/4# dry mashed, I figured its the only way to avoid the moisture leaking after. I don't know what Pear Potato William is ..oh ok just Googled it - hey good idea. I thought it had something to do with pears. Have an aversion to them, just the mouth feel, like lychees. Thank you

    Mike...they were cheap because the skins were going...too moist for me, have the remainders drying between sheets of newspaper in the dark till I can get to them tomorrow. I'd like to try and use them for potato wedges, but the skin is a bit iffy. Inside is fine. (I don't know what that smilie is about, apart from perhaps open your mind? to new ideas etc etc)

    BDL - thank you - great ideas- just a query - would the grated potatoes need to be soaked in acidulated water to prevent browning?

    Also, the idea of baking them and gutting them to freeze sounds a good way to process them, as the skins are turning a tad, so store the innards.

    When I have some good skinned spuds, I'll definitely try keeping skins as you described.
    Nice ideas for a humble ingredient. It's definitely a staple in our household.

    Back to my plastic peeler!

    DC
     
  8. mikelm

    mikelm

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    :level:

    Maybe it represents ear-wax removal.

    Mike

    but I really like :thumb: and especially :peace: ... peace? but I think of it as exuberant approval.
     
  9. teamfat

    teamfat

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    It is intended to be a pig applying lipstick.

    mjb.
     
  10. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    They don't exactly go brown during the amount of time it takes to freeze them so much as "rusty." But yes, you're right. Goodunya, Sheila. Acidulate the final wash in order to keep them pure, virginal white.

    BDL
     
  11. cyberdoc

    cyberdoc

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    I agree with Mike. I never peel potatoes, the skin is the best part.:thumb:
     
  12. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    The purpose commercially of not peeling potatoes was not to look out for your health< it was strickly for PROFIT it requires labor and time to peel . Now they are trying to grow a russet potato with hardly any skin at all/ Simplot is developing it for McDonalds.