potato terminology

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by jelka mohoric, May 1, 2011.

  1. jelka mohoric

    jelka mohoric

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Hi!

    I'm searching for an english term to describe potatoes, first cooked completely with the peel still on, then peeled and sauteed in a pan with a sprinkle of oil, chopped onions and a touch of salt. Does it exist at all?

    Thank you.
     
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    Welcome to Cheftalk, Jelka.

    If you cut the cooked potatoes into dice or chunks you would have home-fried potatoes, sometimes called cottage-fried.

    If you're leaving them whole for the saute I'm not familiar with that approach.
     
  3. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

    Messages:
    2,271
    Likes Received:
    205
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    Just add some bacon too and you could name it in french "pommes de terre à l'Alsacienne".

    I have no idea how the english name could be, maybe "Potatoes Alsace style"

    BTW Alsace is a french region.
     
  4. petemccracken

    petemccracken

    Messages:
    3,401
    Likes Received:
    158
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Are you looking for menu description(s) or for recipe technique description(s)?

    If recipe technique, the fully cooked, skin on, potatoes could be boiled, baked, or microwaved, depending on the actual process.

    The peeled potatoes, depending on the size and shape, might have a variety of names, i.e. home fries, O'Brien potatoes, country fries, cottage fries, Southern Hash Browns, sautéed potatoes with onions, etc.
     
     
  5. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    174
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    To saute them whole is going to take a long time ,better to boil al dente then finish by roasting.  If you cut them up you can go many ways which have already been mentioned above. If you leave skin on buy a thin skin potato and wash it well first..
     
  6. maryb

    maryb

    Messages:
    2,460
    Likes Received:
    151
    Exp:
    Semi pro/retired now
    Bubble and squeak.
     
  7. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    Mary, could you expand on that response?

    To me, bubble and squeak is a dish made with cooked beef and vinegar. Potatoes don't enter the picture at all, let alone star.
     
  8. petemccracken

    petemccracken

    Messages:
    3,401
    Likes Received:
    158
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Hm, "Bubbles 'n Squeak" means, to me, mashed potatoes and cabbage, no?
     
     
  9. pattypan

    pattypan

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    yes.fried until crusty.mmmmmm. I add a bit of onion too.
     
  10. chefross

    chefross

    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    348
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    Lyonnasie?
     
  11. jelka mohoric

    jelka mohoric

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Hi again.

    First, thank you for such a warm welcome and vast response. I'm glad to encounter such kind people on this forum, few forums are such..

    And now, to the business:D Yes, I was looking for a name, not a process of cooking, but thanks anyway for the recipe suggestions. I just might try them in the following days ;) And out of all suggestions, I believe the name home fries would suit the best, but I'm still slightly sceptic of it. The thing is that only a few recipes resemble mine. In it the cooked and peeled potato is sliced in whichever form, because it doesn't keep it in the end, due to the mixing during the process of sautéeing (if i can call it now this way). The final result is a kind of mush, but not creamy like mashed potato - it has larger bits. Whereas in the majority of recipes the potato keeps its form... Is this factor relevant regarding the nomenclature?

    Thank you again.
     
  12. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    174
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    There is a Potato hashed in cream and a Smashed potato. I really do not think you have invented anything new. And what is the point of this whole procedure???
     
  13. maryb

    maryb

    Messages:
    2,460
    Likes Received:
    151
    Exp:
    Semi pro/retired now
    I have seen bubble and squeak made both ways, potatoes only and potatoes and cabbage(some even include bacon). I am not a food historian so which one is original I have no clue. KYH it is an English dish as far as I know so your version may be from a different country.
     
  14. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    129
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    Well, there's a typo in my post, Mary.

    I meant to say, cooked meat, cabbage, and vinegar. Far as I know, it's a dish designed to use up left-overs, and is, as you say, English in origin.

    I did a search, and most recipes do, indeed, call for potatoes. My impression is that the use of meat predates WWII, and that might have something to do with it. Wish some of our British members would chime in on this.

    Jelka: With home fries the potatoes do, indeed, keep their shape. So that nomenclature wouldn't apply. Sounds to me that ChefEd is more on track with this.
     
  15. french fries

    french fries

    Messages:
    5,173
    Likes Received:
    302
    Exp:
    At home cook
    In French, potatoes cooked like that are called "Pommes miettes": http://www.hotellerie-restauration.ac-versailles.fr/fiches/?id=72

    If you add onions to anything you can call it "à la Lyonnaise", so you could call this dish "Pommes miettes à la Lyonnaise". 

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2011
  16. jelka mohoric

    jelka mohoric

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    At home cook
    French fries, thank you. This is exactly the dish I was looking for.

    And chefedb, I knew I haven't invented a new dish. I am just translating a menu from my language to english and decided to ask the professionals on the topic, since I couldnt find a solution by myself on any means. 

    Thank you again for all the help and kind responses. I wish you all the best in everything you do.

    Bye
     
  17. french fries

    french fries

    Messages:
    5,173
    Likes Received:
    302
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Great! You're welcome. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  18. bazza

    bazza

    Messages:
    396
    Likes Received:
    14
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Just read this and wanted to expand on Bubble and squeak. It is the left over vegetables from a Sunday roast dinner crushed and fried in a pan until a crust forms underneath. Usually served with sliced cold meat left from the roast dinner too. Tradtionally it is potatoes and cabbage but any other vegetables can be added.
     
  19. ishbel

    ishbel

    Messages:
    3,147
    Likes Received:
    40
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Bubble and squeak is great with things like brussel sprouts or savoy cabbage.  With plenty of crushed roasted potatoes or mashed potatoes.

    I like to add spring onions to the squeak!
     
  20. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

    Messages:
    3,207
    Likes Received:
    155
    Exp:
    Private Chef
    I think ChefRoss and  Mary called it .  and French Fries nailed it down. . Now depending where your from , it can have alot of twists as far as ingredients.

    @ French Fries , great pic and definition, I checked it myself, at one point it was getting a bit confusing, same def. For the other thread , caramalized cheese:  "tuile au fromage" , makes sense now but it took time to figure that out......enjoy the process of the answer.