Potato Ricers

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by chrislehrer, Sep 4, 2010.

  1. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    I've taken a look, and potato ricers come in a wide variety of prices. Apart from the occasional gross difference in size, I can't see that there's very much else to go by. So I'm wondering if anyone has an opinion on a durable, effective potato ricer for home use, preferably one that can go in a dishwasher.
     
  2. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Doesn't matter much Chris. 

    Unless you're going to give it a big workout, plastic is fine.  It's nice to have a choice of a couple discs; so stainless removable discs are a good feature.

    If you're going to want a lot of production, you'll be better off with a food mill.  If you'll only use it occasionally, your can push potatoes through a cap chinoise -- which is very versatile, and might better occupy limited storage space.  

    Our ricer is an MIU, and very good.  I did a brief search and can't find the same enamelled model, everything available is stainless and expensive.  Kuhn Rikon and Cuisipro will likely be good for the price.  OXO Goodgrips is always at the top for this sort of stuff.  If I were replacing mine, I'd go OXO.  

    BDL 
     
  3. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    I've got an Oxo. As far as it goes, it's fine. But the capacity leaves a little to be desired, and be prepared to rice your spuds in smallish amounts at a time.
     
  4. amazingrace

    amazingrace

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    I have a food mill with changeable disks.  It essentially does the same as a ricer, however with larger capacity and [for me] easier to use.  I don't have enough hand strength to use a ricer.  The food mill is also a multitasker.  Aside from dispatching spuds,  It's great for processing fruits and vegetables.  Just steam them in their skins,  and put them through,  the skins and seeds stay in the mill,  and the good stuff goes through. 
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    i have the kuhn rikon. mashed potatoes are a breeze now.  
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Only thing I have against Food Mills is that where the blade is attached it tends to rust no matter what you do. Where as the ricer does not, or at least the ones I have used don't. Other then that I prefer the mill.
     
  7. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    In the same mysterious way a thermos bottle knows to keep hot things hot and cold things cold, a mill leaves the peel and the fiber on top, dispensing only the fruit of the goodness into the puree.  Spooky.

    Mills are great, and they're better at volume than ricing.  But the potato puree they make isn't quite the same texture as the potatoes which come from a ricer.  Nothing can beat ricing for lightness.  Also, the ricing process doesn't work the potato as much, which seems to net a little extra leeway down the line.  That is, you can mix the potatoes more without fear of overworking; overworking being the primary sin of potato mashing. 

    BDL
     
  8. amazingrace

    amazingrace

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    My food mill is all stainless,  so it doesn't give that problem. 
     
  9. amazingrace

    amazingrace

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    Yes,  this is true.  But even that little problem can be overcome with some planning.    I put cubed butter and other "add-ins" into the heated milk,  then gently fold this into the potatoes, being careful not to over-mix.  Even with riced potatoes, over-working them is possible.  My mother in law always dumped the cooked potatoes into a bowl along with the cold milk & butter and beat them with the electric hand mixer until they begged for mercy.  Fine if you like glue.  She asked me why mine were always so "fluffy".  However when I told her what I did that was different,  she said "well, I always whip them".   So, that settled that.  Even though she liked my potatoes better than her own,  she still clung to her own way of doing them.  LOL
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2010
  10. sorange

    sorange

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    We bought a killer ricer recently, made by Gefu (German mfr.)  18/10 stainless, very efficient ricing design; built like a brick outhouse. /img/vbsmilies/smilies//smile.gif