Pot Pie

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NICE.  Great pics. 

I use a "Pepperidge Farm" puff pastry product just like you show. They make them in 2 sizes. I've got an outlet store 1/2 mile from my house. Anyway, I love using the puff pastry like that. I've used it for both main dishes and for 1-2 bite appetizers. Both for sweets and savories. 
 
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I use regular pie crust brushed with egg wash or milk


 Not sure what a regular pie crust is.

Come to think of it I have used puff pastry for a top and bottom layer of a beef and guiness pie and it worked out just fine.  Last year I experimented and made a shortcrust pastry for a meat pie using crisco and although the flaky texture was perfect the bottom layer came out too thick because I didn't know how to roll it out and transfer it to the pan properly, and also it tasted like... well it tasted like crisco.

Has anyone ever made a pie crust with oil?  I know it's a technique that certain women use, I might research that a bit and give it a go. It's time I got over my phobia of pie crusts.
Regular pie crust is a brisee' - you rub cold butter into flour and salt, add cold water all at once, toss, press togehter and roll. 

But if you've never had a pot pie with a biscuit crust, you don't know TRUE comfort food. 
Biscuit is butter rubbed into flour and salt and baking soda, then cold buttermilk, yoghurt or sour milk is mixed in and it's briefly kneaded a couple of turns and rolled out thick.  It's thick and soft.  Think of a savory scone.  It absorbs some of the sauce nicely, and it;s soft and warm - what comfort food should be. 

Puff pastry is not really suited for a rustic and homey dish like chicken pot pie, in my opinion - it;s been used more now that you can get it frozen, but it's not so comforting!
 
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Chris

Vol-au-vent and Bouchee's are classics and were used also for The presentation of Crabmeat Dewey, Seafood Newburg and  LobsterThermidore, as well as desserts.

Mini Bouchees are great for hot hors' d.. If you buy them most time 2 sizes available but if you make them you can make any shape and size. The frozen ones cost about .38 to.. 45 each. The Mini's abot 15 to 20.
 
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SIDURI 

Regular pie crust  flour, fat pinch salt and icewate. Cut in fat to flour use drop of icewater to bring together. Proceed to roll on well floured surface. And I agree puff paste is not so good but it is easy way out.
 
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howdy!

yeap,the roasted one would be nicer;and my way,the boiled one would be easier for my stomach^_^

different taste,right?

choose the one fit u and yr time^_^

thx
 
3,599
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Joined Aug 13, 2006
SIDURI 

Regular pie crust  flour, fat pinch salt and icewate. Cut in fat to flour use drop of icewater to bring together. Proceed to roll on well floured surface. And I agree puff paste is not so good but it is easy way out.


isn't that what i said?  I don;t like it on pot pie, though.  I like biscuit crust, or a cornbread/biscuit hybrid.  Thick, soft, bottom half sopping up the juice, top half mildly browned. 
 
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Those puff pastry rings look delish, but it seems there isn't much room for the filling,   Could you make more "sides" and less "bottom" somehow?

DD
 
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I was under impression it was anything made in a pot and poured into a regular full pie crust upper an\\d lower.
 
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Those puff pastry rings look delish, but it seems there isn't much room for the filling,   Could you make more "sides" and less "bottom" somehow?

DD
Well, they are individual portions. Mostly they are served with some filling quasi-nonchalantly pouring out of the pastry and spreading on the plate. It's mostly more than enough for one person.

In the older days, bakeries made larger pastries, let's say family size ones, but I haven't seen them anymore.
 
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