Pot pie crust

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Nov 11, 2013.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I'm making one today and nervous about it. I have several recipes but most have sugar in them. It's minuscule but do I omit it since its savory dish? I'm so nervous!
     
  2. dillbert

    dillbert Banned

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    hmmmm, I've never put sugar in a pie crust - savory or other.

    lard yes; sugar no . . .

    go without it - it'll work!
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    If you are using a basic 3-2-1 pie crust recipe, feel free to omit the sugar.  Sugar has little place in a savory pot pie crust.  I don't like butter crusts (but some do) and prefer lard or veg shortning.  Also consider adding appropriate herbs, or cheese.  A good discussion on savorie crust options was in Clayton's pastry book if I recall correctly.
     
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I think I'll omit the sugar.  I like the flakiness of a crust made with vegetable shortening but I don't use it for health concerns.  Now all I taste is a big mouthful of crisco /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif.  I'm working on getting good flakiness without it.
     
  5. chefedb

    chefedb

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    A pinch of sugar will improve the color.
     
  6. siduri

    siduri

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    I absolutely love the slight sweetness of the crust with the savory filing.  I say put it.

    I also say to make a biscuit crust, much more appealing.  They're breadier and sop up some of the sauce, and pure comfort food. 

    i like a little sugar in the biscuit crust too. 
     
  7. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Good point.  It will do that!

    For savory pies I use egg wash or cream wash to improve color.
     
  8. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Too late, no sugar or egg wash.  I rolled it thin, hubby and I don't like biscuits.  Too much bread.  I'm pretty sure I messed it up but it is what it is.  I'll post a pic.
     
  9. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    I use half butter/crisco and just a pinch, as chefed mentioned, of sugar... I brush the top with cream or halfandhalf. no egg
     
  10. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Lately for pot pies I've been doing just a biscuit type dough top crust, in individual dishes rather than a full pie crust.


    A bit of sugar may have helped with more even browning of the top, bit I doubt it makes a lot of difference in taste.

    mjb.
     
  11. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I think some sugar may help in taste. This was the easiest dough I've made. Thank goodness for the food processor. It's all butter and flour and a little salt. I know the picture is not appetizing but I wanted to capture the flakiness of the dough. My best ever. In terms of taste? Meh. It may be the black if sugar, don't know. But I used a fresh bag of King Arthur flour and fresh kerrygold butter it was good but not awesome.
     
  12. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    My favorite savory pastry recipe is one I use for a beet and goat cheese galette. It calls for butter, no shortening, and more salt (no sugar) than most I've seen and there is a liberal sprinkling of fresh thyme whisked into the flour and salt.
     
  13. mike9

    mike9

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    I made individual ones too and use crescent roll dough.  I pinch a couple together then roll them to shape.  It's simple, fast and predictable. 

    I also use them for knishes and sometimes I'll pinch a whole tube together into a sheet then put a filling on it and roll it up.  Great with smoked salmon, dill and goat cheese. 
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
  14. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I'm slowly coming into the skill of making a dough.  Anyone here who knows me knows that I'm terrified of baking and each year I have my annual apple pie disaster.  I hope this time it will be different.  I admit to using prepackaged pie crusts from P***** but the ingredients are listed as follows:

    "Enriched Flour Bleached (wheat flour, niacin, ferrous sulfate, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), Partially Hydrogenated Lard with BHA and BHT to Protect Flavor, Wheat Starch, Water. Contains 2% or less of: Salt, Rice Flour, Xanthan Gum, Potassium Sorbate and Sodium Propionate (preservatives), Citric Acid, Yellow 5, Red 40."

    I actually just clicked on my own pic and the dough looks really good close up.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2013
  15. dillbert

    dillbert Banned

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    my knee jerk reaction to the pix was "overworked" - then you mentioned the food processor.....

    for decades I used two table knives to cut in the fat - then I got lazy and bought a pastry blender (g)

    using a food processor there's a big temptation to "give it one more shot" - not a good approach.

    it can be used quite successfully - just be alert to pulse / blend the absolute minimum.

    over working the dough will cause / allow the wheat gluten to develop - which does not help with the 'flaky & tender bit'

    the other common mis-step is too much water/liquid - the dough needs to 'just come together'

    too much of either and/or both gets you into shortbread territory vs pie crust.

    you can also check into the vodka pie dough recipes.  the vodka/alcohol alters the way the fat and flour react, it's not a 'let's just have some more booze' thing.

    then, after enlarging the photo - I'd agree - looks very respectable - so you're certainly on the right track of a no-pie disaster this year!

    a few blisters / bubbles would add to the flakiness - I didn't see them in the pix but it may have happened 'spread around' the crust.

    a good leaf lard adds not only taste but being different than butter, a slightly different flakiness.  be aware, lard is not lard; some lard can have 'off flavors' so look for a good leaf lard - white may or may not come "already rendered" - rendering is duck soup easy, so don't worry there.

    I like to use 75% lard and 25% butter - the butter has its own flavor and helps with browning much more 'efficiently' than sugar.

    if no lard is at hand, I use 100% butter.

    oh, btw and fwiw....  when Crisco changed (the transfat thing...) many many bakers found their old t&t recipes did not work so well anymore....
     
  16. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    No, I don't think it was overworked.  I only pulsed it 7 times.  I could probably have gotten away with 1tbsp less water.  I didn't do much more than gather up the crumbles and press them into a disk.  I should have refrigerated a little longer but ran out of time.  In fact I have made pie crust by hand and by using one of those hand held dough cutters and this is the best it's ever come out.  The by hand methods have never worked for me.

    Cool tip: I don't keep ice on hand so when I needed ice water I put about an inch of water in my pyrex measuring cup and froze it. 

    Question:  I have a very small disc of dough left that's in the fridge.  Enough for a single serving of something.  What can I do with it?  
     
  17. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Miss KK, when ever I have any pie dough leftover, I take the already rolled dough and cut them into different shapes, sprinkle with cinnamon sugar and bake them as I would cookies
     
  18. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Some of you might want to checkout the Pastry Forum to read my thoughts on tarte crust.
     
  19. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Also to achieve a much browner crust, do this:
    1. Blind bake with weights for 20 minutes in the upper third of the oven.
    2. Take one egg white and mix with 1 tsp water and 1 tsp granulated sugar.
    3. Whip the mixture 'till just barely frothy.
    4. Remove blind baked crust from oven and remove weights (unless you like preservatives in your food).
    5. Brush the crust with the entire beaten egg white mixture.
    6. place back into the oven (the upper third) to bake for another 25 minutes.
    7. Remove from oven and place on cooling rack until cool.  Are you cool enough for this?  Huh?   .............................Punk?
    8. Then fill with your favorite filling and place back into the oven (bottom shelf) for another bake lasting from 30 to 60 minutes, depending on the filling.  You want the crust/filling to cook thoroughly from the bottom.
    Oh yes, the tarte or pie shell is always placed onto a preheated sheet pan for ALL baking procedures.  That way the bottom of the crust bakes thru and thru and flakyness guaranteed.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2013
  20. dillbert

    dillbert Banned

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    not going to work too well for a pot pie with a top crust.

    >>favorite filling

    for fruits types and web type fillings, make sure those are piping hot before they go into the pie shell.

    >>preheated sheet pan

    good idea, but utterly useless.  the amount of heat content in a "sheet pan" not gonna' do much for ueber-heating the bottom.

    baking stone,,,, maybe; sheet pan,,, not at all.